Contact Us  | Member Login  |  Site Map
 
Go To:

Wednesday Sessions

Thursday Sessions
8:00am-9:30am
8:00am-11:30am
10:00am-11:30am
12:30pm-2:00pm
12:30pm-4:00pm
2:30pm-4:00pm
4:15pm-5:15pm

Poster Sessions
11:30am-1:30pm

Poster Sessions
4:00pm-6:00pm

Friday Sessions
8:30am-10:00am
8:30am-12:00pm
10:30am-12:00pm
12:00pm-1:00pm
2:00pm-3:30pm
2:00pm-5:00pm
3:45pm-5:15pm

Saturday Sessions
8:00am-9:30am
9:45am-11:15am
9:45am-12:45pm
11:30am-1:00pm
Technical Sessions

Welcome

Registration

Highlighted Presenters

Sheraton Station Square

Continuing Education

Exhibit at PSHA

Convention Progam

Wednesday, March 21

6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Seminar 1 - PSHA Town Hall Meeting

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of PSHA Executive Board members to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology, including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs and state licensure requirements. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Audience members will be given an opportunity to ask questions and contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this presentation, the attendee will be able to describe the history of Pennsylvania licensure and certification requirements related to the schools, identify at least three issues impacting service delivery, list pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

8:15 pm to 9:15 pm

Seminar 2 - Professional Roundtable Discussions

These discussions will provide an opportunity for professionals to engage in dynamic roundtables to discuss important workplace issues with colleagues from across the state. We will have several roundtables to choose from including: early Intervention, school setting, acute/rehab setting, skilled nursing facility/home health, higher education and audiology. Each discussion will have a facilitator to encourage discussion points. It will be a great opportunity to share best practices, concerns and questions with colleagues in similar work settings.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe concerns facing professionals in specific work settings, describe best practices for assessment, treatment and documentation, describe strategies to improve professional service delivery.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Thursday, March 22

8:00 am - 9:30 am

Seminar 3 - Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Survivorship Care After Head and Neck Cancer

Tamara Wincko, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; Jonas Johnson, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; Marci Lee Nilsen, PhD, University Pittsburgh School of Nursing

Head and neck cancer is a collective term to describe malignancies that develop in the throat, larynx, mouth, nose or sinuses. While there have been advancements in the epidemiology and treatment of head and neck cancer, early detection is still inadequate, with the majority of patients diagnosed at an advanced state. The standard of treatment for these patients consists of multiple modalities including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. Treatment can contribute to significant functional limitations, with over half of head and neck cancer survivors reporting at least three treatment-related effects that impact their daily activities. For many patients, the treatment area consists of structures vital to swallowing. Expectedly, dysphagia is the most commonly reported treatment-related effect, but survivors frequently report other treatment-related issues such as xerostomia that may also contribute to swallowing difficulties. It is imperative that patients receive early education and preventive rehabilitation programs to minimize functional decline. This seminar will focus on the treatment related toxicities and the severity of side effects during and after chemo radiotherapy that leaves patients with dysphagia, limited range of motion and dental issues. The importance of early intervention, eat and exercise and the role of other specialists including the physician, physical therapist, dietitian, nurse coordinator, and dentist will be emphasized. This team will explain how the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Clinic uses a multifaceted approach to augment patient outcomes and how community speech-language pathologists can further enhance patient care.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to, identify three of the most commonly reported treatment effects, list three strategies to reduce harmful side effects, identify available resources for patients in need of help.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 4 - Establishing a Private Practice and Making It Work

Amy Lustig, PhD, CCC-SLP, Salus University; Susan DeMilia, MA, CCC-SLP, Salus University/Circle Speech Services, LLC

This seminar will give attendees a broad understanding of the issues and considerations when beginning a private practice in speech-language pathology and related fields. Practical subjects such as location, physical space, insurance, hiring and marketing will be addressed. Ethical and professional topics related to private practice will also be addressed. We will present two case management studies to demonstrate case management in private practice and how it might differ from other settings.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to list three things to consider before going into private practice, list three differences between private practice and another setting (e.g., school, hospital), list three ways to market a private practice.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

8:00 am - 11:30 am

Short Course 1 - Pediatric Neuromotor Speech Disorders: Diagnosis and Intervention Strategies

Laura Ball, PhD, CCC-SLP, Children's National Health System

This intermediate level short course will provide information for speech-language pathologists on natural speech assessment and intervention with a focus on neuromotor speech disorders of childhood. Detailed assessment and intervention strategies will be provided to assist the speech-language pathologist complete differential diagnosis and address each type and phase of function to optimally support ongoing participation in daily communication activities. Examples and case presentations will address dysarthrias encountered among children with neuromotor impairments, including neurodegenerative and developmental courses. Specific cases will illustrate white matter disease/leukodystrophy (Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: spastic-ataxic), cerebral palsy (spastic), neuromuscular disease (Spinal Muscular Atrophy: flaccid), and neuroimmune disorders (MS: ataxic), among others. Assessment strategies, classification protocols and intervention methods for natural speech will be presented. Considerations for introduction of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and characterizing features of various diagnoses will be introduced.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify characteristics of pediatric dysarthrias, distinguish dysarthria characteristics in children, associate dysarthria type with various pediatric etiologies, integrate AAC strategies in the context of pediatric motor speech disorders.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 2 - Pediatric Dysphagia: A Case-Based Overview of Assessment and Treatment

Erin Redle, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Cincinnati

Treating children with feeding and swallowing disorders requires the complex integration of multiple factors including the child's medical history, oral sensorimotor skills, safety for swallowing, behavior and environmental factors. Using case studies, this presentation will provide an introduction to the signs and symptoms of feeding and swallowing disorders in children. A framework through which one can consider the integration of these complex factors to make a diagnosis and planning for treatment will also be presented and applied to the cases. Management of feeding and swallowing will also be discussed as it relates to each case and will provide a general overview of treatment considerations. Also woven into the case studies will be strategies to address the external factors that can complicate the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders such as the impact on the immediate and extended family, social-emotional issues, financial resources and access to services. The consequences of feeding and swallowing disorders in the educational setting will also be discussed, as will strategies to support children with feeding and swallowing disorders in this setting.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify two signs of oral sensorimotor disorders in children and state two treatment strategies, identify two signs of pharyngeal phase swallowing disorders in children and state two potential treatment strategies, identify three consequences of feeding and swallowing disorders for social expediencies and/or educational performance, identify three specific ways feeding and swallowing disorders impact the family unit.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Short Course 3 - What Works: Evidence-Based Vocabulary Intervention in School-Aged Children

Dawna Duff, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, University of Pittsburgh

Vocabulary is an area of need for many children on a speech-language pathologist’s caseload, but there are also significant challenges: identifying which words to target (there are so many!), and knowing effective ways to teach them. This short course will help you understand what affects you can expect for vocabulary intervention, evidence-based ways to identify target words, how to generate effective definitions and how to plan sessions targeting vocabulary words. Two different approaches will be discussed- the Robust Vocabulary Instruction (Beck, McKeown and Kucan, 2008, 2006), and Biemiller and Boote (2006). It will also integrate other current vocabulary intervention research. The short course will be hands-on, with opportunities to practice each of these skills.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to, summarize the literature on the effect of vocabulary intervention on word knowledge and reading comprehension, identify target vocabulary words for intervention from read-aloud books using two evidence-based procedures, generate 'child-friendly' definitions of target words, plan intervention activities for target words using principles of Robust Vocabulary Instruction and the Biemiller and Boote methodology.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 4 - Toss the Workbooks: Person-Centered, Functional Interventions for People With Dementia

Becky Khayum, MS, CCC-SLP, Northwestern Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center/ MemoryCare Corporation; Emily Rogalski, PhD, Northwestern Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center

This short course will provide a summary of different neurodegenerative dementia syndromes and their relationship to brain anatomy and underlying neuropathology, including some of the challenges in reaching the correct diagnosis. It will emphasize the benefits of using a team care model for diagnosing and treating dementia syndromes across clinical settings. For speech-language pathologists (SLPs), it will describe how to complete a person-centered versus diagnostic assessment as well as practical recommendations for meeting reimbursement standards. The second half of this short course will focus upon evidence-based, cognitive-communication interventions for people with dementia, with a focus on person-centered, functional approaches. While there are many types of dementia, this short course will focus upon neurodegenerative dementia syndromes where individuals experience a progressive loss of memory, language, visuospatial functions or changes in behavior/comportment. Practical examples of how to use evidence-based interventions for individuals with different dementia profiles will be provided in the context of specific functional activities. It will also review the ways in which technology can be integrated directly and indirectly into care. Modification of interventions and activities as symptoms progress and how to set up treatment programs in long-term care facilities or memory care communities will be reviewed. Treatment barriers and potential solutions will also be discussed, including how to demonstrate progress for neurodegenerative conditions to ensure reimbursement, increasing family involvement in treatment sessions, getting staff buy-in on recommended interventions and using technology to create personalized aids within sessions to comply with productivity standards.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe at least three different clinical dementia syndromes and their defining features, describe the key components of person-centered assessment for individuals with dementia, describe four evidence-based approaches for the treatment of amnestic versus aphasic dementia profiles and how to integrate personally relevant stimuli into the plan of care, describe the difference between direct versus indirect use of technology to support evidence-based person-centered interventions.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

10:00 am - 11:30 am

Seminar 5 - PA Licensure Update

Amy Goldman, MA, CCC-SLP; Judith Pachter Schulder; Sandra Matter from the PA Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Members of the Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology will present updates related to final regulations (July 2017). In addition, members will be available to answer questions from attendees. This seminar will be of interest to any licensee or prospective licensee, in either of the communication professions.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe licensure changes related to new graduates (e.g., provisional license), list the requirements for engaging in neurophysiologic interoperative monitoring, define continuing education requirements for licensure, contrasted with requirements for Act 48 and ASHA CCC maintenance.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 6 - Follow the Leader: Aphasia Group Outcomes With Leadership Changes

Anita Wasileski, MS, CCC-SLP; Pamela Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP; Jenna Broskey; Michelle Baldwin; Megan Frutchey; MaryKathryn Post; Alexa Roma; Makenzie Stutzman; Caitlin Sullivan; Nicole Miller from Bloomsburg University

This project is a continuation of the work of the Aphasia Group at Bloomsburg University where we have worked with a group of three to four people with aphasia (PWA) for several years. Prior projects have used a consistent facilitator in various language-based tasks, such as storytelling and supportive conversation. In both instances, a single individual (sometimes a student clinician and sometimes a PWA) led the group and was responsible for cueing and task complexity. It may be that at least part of the success of the group interactions stems from the consistency of one single leader/facilitator. This project will use semantic feature analysis to facilitate word retrieval in our aphasia group. This approach permits exploration of multiple aspects of words and concepts, and can involve the use of visual aids such as graphic organizers, cognitive/lexical webs, etc. Instead of a single facilitator, the project will utilize a rotation of several different clinicians to facilitate semantic feature analysis to improve word retrieval in group interaction and conversation. Can a group of PWAs demonstrate use of semantic feature analysis tools when multiple facilitators are involved in therapy session by session? How will PWAs rate their comfort with the cueing strategies when implemented by different student clinician facilitators?

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe the mechanisms of semantic feature analysis as a treatment approach for word retrieval, discuss group interaction variables that may influence word retrieval during treatment, state three factors that influence patient/client success in group treatment when the facilitator varies from day to day.

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Seminar 7 - Using Virtual Dissection to Optimize Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

Samantha Buldo, BS; Cecelia Cronin, BS; Emily Lukasavage, BS; Annette Ritzko; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, from Misericordia University

Anatomy and physiology education for speech-language pathology students needs to be engaging and hands-on to provide a solid foundation of knowledge for clinical application. However, many undergraduate speech-language pathology programs do not provide students with the opportunity to participate in hands-on methods, such as cadaveric dissection, and instead rely on line drawings and diagrams to visualize structures. In our state-of-the-art program, we utilize a unique virtual dissection table that allows students to study the complex structures related to speech and hearing through high quality, interactive imaging of a real human cadaver. Specific functions of the table and its positive implications to undergraduate learning will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to explain why hands-on teaching methods enhance the instruction of anatomy and physiology, discuss the benefits of virtual dissection on undergraduate speech-language student education, explain the basic tools and controls of a virtual dissection system, explain how to isolate a structure of the speech and hearing mechanism using a virtual dissection table.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 8 - Application of the Life Participation Approach: Primary Progressive Aphasia

Becky Khayum, MS, CCC-SLP, Northwestern Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center/ MemoryCare Corporation; Emily Rogalski, PhD, Northwestern Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center

Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a clinical dementia syndrome characterized by deficits in language with relative sparing of other cognitive domains. This seminar will describe the clinical dementia syndrome of PPA and its defining features, in order to better provide disease education and counseling to individuals with PPA and their family members. It will cover initial symptoms, progression of deficits and its association with different underlying neuropathologies. This seminar will emphasize the importance of determining whether a speech-language pathologist (SLP) is completing a diagnostic assessment versus an assessment to develop a person-centered plan for treatment. Discussion will cover how to integrate the use of functionally focused standardized tests into a person-centered, dynamic assessment that will identify ways to increase life participation in meaningful activities. The remainder of the seminar will focus upon application of the life participation approach for aphasia (LPAA) for people with PPA. A unique combination of impairment-directed interventions and compensatory interventions may often be appropriate, with the recommended strategies frequently adjusted to meet an individual's changing communication needs as the disease progresses. The seminar will highlight how to integrate personally relevant stimuli into the treatment plan and will also provide a practical roadmap of how to apply evidence-based interventions towards life participation goals.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to differentiate PPA from other clinical dementia syndromes (e.g., Alzheimer's dementia), describe the difference between a diagnostic assessment versus a person-centered assessment to develop a plan of care for an individual with PPA and determine which type of assessment you are likely to complete at your current health care setting, describe the key components to writing a functional reimbursable goal for an individual with PPA, describe the difference between impairment-based and compensatory interventions and give examples of how these different approaches might be applied for an individual with PPA in a way that is consistent with the life participation approach to care.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

12:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Short Course 5 - Clinical Intervention for Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Laura Ball, PhD, CCC-SLP, Children’s National Health System

This short course will provide information for speech-language pathologists on natural speech assessment and intervention with a focus on the neurodegenerative course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Detailed assessment and intervention strategies will be provided to assist the speech-language pathologist to address each phase of function to optimally support ongoing participation in daily communication activities. Examples and case presentations will address anticipated course of impairments based on a neurodegenerative course. Specific cases will illustrate tracking natural speech production, supporting effective natural speech productions, introduction of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and appropriate timing of ongoing interventions. Assessment strategies and intervention methods for natural speech will be presented. Considerations for introduction of AAC and funding options will be presented. New developments in AAC will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe the neurophysiological bases of speech impairments in ALS, discuss strategies for assessment of natural speech in ALS, plan a targeted natural speech and AAC treatment program for someone with ALS.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 6 - Applying I2 to Working With Families in Early Intervention

Erin Redle, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Cincinnati

Coaching families to implement therapeutic strategies into their daily routine can be challenging for both the clinician and the family. Although not known by many clinicians, the fields of implementation and innovation sciences offer scientifically supported and proven useful strategies for facilitating change. These strategies are used to support change at a systematic level in medical and educational settings, but also provide insight into how to change behavior and actions in even the most ingrained daily routines. This short course will introduce the elements of implementation and innovation sciences relevant to coaching and working with families to facilitate change and adaptation of daily routines. Participants will learn specific techniques and tools for facilitating and measuring changes. Although this presentation will focus on early intervention, the concepts and strategies are applicable to carryover in general and will generalize across settings. At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to define implementation science, state four principles of implementation and innovation science that will facilitate changes in behavior, state two methods for measuring change when working with families, identify one strategy that can be adapted to facilitate carryover to a setting or situation outside of early intervention.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Short Course 7 - Collaborating Across Disciplines to Support Children With Reading/Writing Disorders

Dawna Duff, Reg. CASLPO, University of Pittsburgh, Melissa Brydon, PhD, Clarion University; Erin Lundblom, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

Interprofessional collaboration is an effective method to meet the diverse needs of students with written language deficits. Through a series of vignettes, participants will identify appropriate evidence-based strategies to address the written language needs of students across a variety of service delivery approaches. The presentation will include both speech-language pathologist and reading specialist perspectives on service delivery for children with written language needs.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify three areas of speech-language pathology expertise which are relevant to children with written language disorders, recognize two skills which speech-language pathologists have which complement the skills of reading specialists, identify two evidence-based practices to support written language development during emergent literacy, learning to read and reading to learn phases of reading development, identify one strategy to support interprofessional collaboration for the delivery of written language services out of the classroom, in the classroom and through consultation.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 8 - Dealing With Difficult People: Working With YOU is Killing ME!

Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Cranky Colleagues? Surly Students? Abominable Administrators? Pushy Parents? Every workplace has its own set of people who are negative, people who oppose our ideas, people who blame others, people who believe others have to lose in order to win, and people who just plain frustrate us. Difficult people in your professional setting create conflict that raises your stress levels and reduces your productivity. This short course will focus on a variety of different types of difficult people, explore their motivation for behaving badly and provide specific strategies for neutralizing their negative behaviors. Don’t reward difficult people for being difficult. Take charge and rise above the fray! At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe how difficult people think, what they fear and why they act the way they do, discuss the dimensions of human behavior and how this relates to the behavior of difficult people and impacts on your productivity and job satisfaction, implement strategies to neutralize the behavior of difficult people in your professional setting.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Seminar 9 - Use of Clinical Simulations Across the Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Curriculum

Elizabeth Grillo, PhD, CCC-SLP; Mareile Koenig, PhD, CCC-SLP; Patricia Swasey Washington, PhD, CCC-SLP from West Chester University

In 2016, the Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CFCC) included the use of clinical simulation (CS) as part of Standard V-B. The CFCC gave programs the option of obtaining up to 75 hours of direct clinical contact through the use of CS. West Chester University’s (WCU) graduate program in speech-language pathology has infused CS into academic and clinical courses to allow students to integrate core concepts and knowledge, demonstrate appropriate professional and clinical skills and incorporate critical thinking and decision-making skills while engaged in evaluation, diagnosis and/or intervention.

This seminar will discuss implementation of CS throughout the academic and clinical graduate program in speech-language pathology at WCU. In academic courses, examples will be given of how different instructors are using computer-based simulations in the following courses, childhood language disorders, articulation and phonology, voice disorders and medical speech-language pathology. Application of computer-based simulations will also be discussed for clinical practica. In addition, simulations with mid-fidelity mannequins will be discussed with application of interprofessional collaborations between nurses and speech-language pathologists. Results from The Clinical Decision-Making Self-Confidence Scale will be reported. The scale was given to students at pre- and post-CS during the medical speech-language pathology academic course in spring 2017. Implementation strategies will cover developing learner objectives, designing course assignments to match the learner objectives, debriefing strategies, evaluating the CS experience and involving interprofessional education and practice. Attendees will apply strategies discussed in the seminar to a hypothetical scenario in graduate curricula in speech-language pathology and/or audiology.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify components that are necessary for successful CS experiences, list four examples of how CS is being used in West Chester University's graduate program in speech-language pathology, apply CS to a hypothetical scenario in graduate curricula in speech-language pathology and/or audiology.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 10 - The Evolving Role of the SLP in Geriatric Preventative Medicine

Nancy Carlino, MA, CCC-SLP, Samantha Procaccini; Robert Skwarecki, PhD, CCC-SLP, from California University of Pennsylvania

There is a growing role for the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in preventing hospital re-admissions in the geriatric population. Although this is a topic that tends to be addressed by physicians and nursing, the SLP has a significant role in prevention, particularly with changes in health care resulting in shorter lengths of stay with higher acuity patients who often have limited family or community support. This may include the SLP’s role in the discharge planning process, the use of functional outcome measures for tracking progress and the use of a more functional approach to therapy. This seminar will address the changing role of the SLP that encompasses prevention in addition to rehabilitation, methods of promoting interprofessional collaborative practices and strategies for prevention at all levels of the health care continuum.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe the role of the SLP in prevention of hospital readmissions, name specific areas of prevention that the SLP should address, identify prevention measures/strategies that the SLP can address in the acute, rehabilitation and home health settings, discuss the benefits of interprofessional collaborative practices to promote prevention of hospital re-admissions.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 11 - NSSLHA Collaboration: Chapter Roundtable

This seminar will provide an opportunity for Pennsylvania NSSLHA chapters to engage in a dynamic roundtable discussion to share the mission of their local chapters. Guided discussions will include topics such as student involvement in speech-language pathology and audiology programs; community service ideas at local, state and national levels; fundraising ideas; programming to increase awareness of the professions and communication disorders; and increasing interaction between local chapters at both the regional and state levels.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Seminar 12 -Adapting Thematic Language Lessons for Nonverbal and Low Language Learners

Anastasia Gahr, MS, CCC-SLP; Sharon Chute, MA, CCC-SLP, Allegheny Intermediate Unit

Adapting functional language lessons for nonverbal and low-language learners can be extremely challenging and time consuming. The purpose of this seminar is to share techniques and methods that meet receptive and expressive language goals for these particular students. Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals and objectives relevant to this type of intervention may include: labeling, sorting, identification of function, initiating, responding to "wh" and yes/no questions and making choices. Various ideas and materials that include visual supports and suggestions on how to incorporate these ideas into communication devices will be addressed. Thematic units will be shared so that you may incorporate these ideas into your language lessons. Actual lessons and materials will be on display. Results of student performance will also be shared based on measured outcomes. Time for questions and comments will be allotted.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to use visual supports or AAC to appropriately augment thematic language lessons, meet receptive language goals for nonverbal and low language learners, meet expressive language goals for nonverbal and low language learners, use simple materials to support sensory needs of nonverbal and low-language learners.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 13 - Factors in Infant Bottle Selection: Importance of Flow Rate

Elizabeth Thrush, MS, CCC-SLP, Reading Hospital

Parents and clinicians attempting to select infant feeding bottles are confronted with a vast array of options and limited objective evidence to guide decisions. There is currently no standardization of bottle nipple flow rates and the disposable nipples used at many hospitals – the first bottle nipples used by many infants – are not commercially available off the shelf. Flow rate is especially important for infants with cardio-respiratory or other feeding issues: faster flows may lead to physiologic instability and early fatigue during feeds, while flow that is too slow may lead to infant frustration and prolonged feeding times. Variations in bottle nipples and nipple flow rates may also contribute to the difficulty some infants appear to have in switching between breast- and bottle-feeding. Understanding relative flow rates of bottle nipples is important for problem solving reported feeding difficulties and proposing solutions. This seminar will review evidence regarding bottle nipple flow rates and the impact of flow rate on infant feeding. Results will be presented from a new study analyzing relative flow rates of commercially available bottle systems and hospital disposable nipples. Implications for hospital and clinical practice, as well as advice to new parents, will also be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to name three factors to consider in bottle selection, explain how bottle nipple flow rate impacts infant feeding performance, identify common misperceptions regarding bottle nipple flow rates and explain how those misperceptions impact patient care.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 14 - Cognitive and Language Performance in Rheumatic Disease: A Preliminary Study

LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP, East Stroudsburg University; Susan Dillmuth-Miller, AuD, CCC-A, East Stroudsburg University; Emily Doll, MS, CCC-SLP, Intermediate Unit 20; Kerry Adams, BA, East Stroudsburg University

Rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation in joints, muscles and for some organs of the body including the brain. Many are considered immune mitigated diseases. Patients with rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid arthritis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Psoriatic arthritis, Lyme disease, Fibromyalgia syndrome and many others often complain of having trouble thinking, forgetting things, and not being able to focus and get things done. This is often coined as brain fog. Research supports the presence of deficits in cognitive functioning associated with “brain fog” including deficits in the areas of attention, memory, problem solving and reasoning and executive functioning. Additionally, research has identified deficits in language including anomia, verbal fluency, overall expressive and receptive language skills and slower language processing speeds. Current research, supported by serum and imaging evidence, associates these deficits with the presence of inflammation in the brain although some studies continue to point to comorbid factors of fatigue and depression. This presentation will discuss current research findings, the challenges of conducting research in this area and the preliminary findings of an on-going research project which seeks to further define areas of need. The presenters will discuss the challenges of choosing test measures appropriate for this population and offer suggestions for clinicians. Study measures, methodology and preliminary findings including a discussion of the patterns of strengths and weaknesses reported by the subjects and identified in assessments will be shared. The speech-language pathologist’s role in assessment of clients with rheumatic disease will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to define rheumatic disease, identify areas of possible cognitive-communicative and language deficits associated with rheumatic disease, identify appropriate measures for assessment of cognitive-communicative deficits in clients with rheumatic disease, define the role of the SLP in assessment of clients with rheumatic disease.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 15 - Systematic Instruction and Technology to Improve Outcomes Following CVA

Kimberly Eichhorn, MS, CCC-SLP, ATP, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System

The combination of multi-disciplinary experience, assistive technology and systematic instructional methods can bring about remarkable outcomes for patients following a cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Throughout the review of case studies of veterans with various degrees of cognitive and physical impairments using multiple assistive technologies, learners will develop an understanding of the concepts of systematic instruction, ways to target multiple learning objectives and consider novel applications for technologies to assist with restoring function. For certain populations, the use of assistive technology in rehabilitation is often thought to serve as a compensatory mechanism as opposed to aid in restoring function. Significant barriers are documented regarding access to appropriate technologies for those in need. Demonstration of effective and positive outcomes, regardless of the technology prescribed, is paramount in promoting provision of technologies to appropriate users. To that end, positive outcomes and generalization of learning have been shown following systematic instructional methods as well as team collaboration. The role of the speech-language pathologist for assessment, treatment and training cannot be understated in regards to maximizing patient outcomes.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to recognize concepts of systematic instruction/error control training in therapeutic approaches, identify a plan for targeting multiple therapeutic goals with team members as well as a plan for generalization of trained skill(s) to functional activities, consider novel applications for routinely used technologies and how to maximize working with team members.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 16 - How the SLP can Participate in and Facilitate Success With Universal Design for Learning Through the Use of Assistive Technology

Priscilla Danielson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Linguistic Solutions, LLC

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a conceptual model of classroom organization and curriculum development that attempts to provide access and participation for the greatest number of students. It is a model that educational administrators and teachers are embracing within the K-12 setting with increasing frequency. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) encounter a large variety of students presenting low- and high-incidence disabilities, who are engaged in a variety of educational settings. Many SLPs are using tablet and Google apps to directly support specific skills, goals and objectives within the therapy process. A variety of technology tools, which are used by the SLP, can support individualized skill learning and carryover to the educational environment, as well as have potential for UDL application. This presentation will enable the SLP to understand the principles of UDL. It will additionally focus on a variety of tablet and Google apps that can be used to support the therapy process, while contributing to and supporting the principals of UDL. Through modeling and implementation of these tools, the SLP can meet the therapy needs of the wide range of students they treat, promote and encourage carryover into the classroom and be an active collaborative partner with the classroom teacher to support the principals of UDL.

At the completion of this presentation, the participants will be able to identify principles of UDL utilized in many educational environments, participants will be able to identify five tablet apps that can be used to support therapy objectives and UDL within the classroom setting, participants will be able to identify at least three apps that address speech-language therapy objectives in the areas of reading, writing, phonics, augmentative and alternative communication that have a role in successful access to the curriculum.

(Instructional Level: Introductory))

Seminar 17 - University Forum

Robert Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, Salus University; Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLP, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s (PSHA) University Forum invites members of undergraduate and graduate programs – department chairs, program and clinical directors, teaching faculty and clinical supervisors – to share their collective knowledge and skills in a guided discussion, to enhance the didactic and clinical education of all students in programs throughout the Commonwealth. Topics to be addressed include interprofessional education, clinical supervision, reimbursement and legislation changes, teaching strategies and accreditation and administrative challenges and successes. Moderated by members of the PSHA Executive Board, aims of this seminar are to spark conversations and foster collaborations, to facilitate the growth of higher education in communication sciences and disorders.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify strategies for infusing didactic and clinical education in communication sciences and disorders programs, illustrate successful integration of interprofessional education into communication sciences and disorders programs, develop approaches to address administrative and legislative changes in higher education that impact communication sciences and disorders programs

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Friday, March 23

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Seminar 18 - SWhat’s in a Word? Morphological Instruction to Build Better Vocabulary/a>

Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Recent evidence indicates that study of the internal structure of words yields positive outcomes in the development of a more robust vocabulary – a critical component for language comprehension in both the oral and written modes. In fact, morphological knowledge is the bridge between language form (spelling, phonology) and language meaning. This seminar will provide participants with both a foundation of knowledge regarding the role of morphology in vocabulary and comprehension as well as numerous morphological instruction strategies to enhance vocabulary for learners across a broad range of grade levels.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to discuss the evidence that supports the use of word analysis to improve oral and written vocabulary, describe the role of morphology as the link between language form and language meaning, implement evidence-supported strategies for enhancing morphological knowledge for beginning, intermediate and advanced learners.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 19 - Use of Electronic Cognitive Assessments – What Have We Learned?

Sarah E. Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP; Elena V. Donoso Brown, PhD, OTR/L, from Duquesne University

Many assessment tools are available to measure cognitive abilities. Electronic cognitive assessments have been developed to help address some of the barriers clinicians face when administering cognitive assessments (e.g., productivity demands, precise measures of response speed). These assessments make use of laptop computers and computerized tablets to improve clinical evaluation of cognitive abilities across multiple populations (e.g., traumatic brain injury, dementia, cognitive changes associated with normal aging, cognitive changes following concussion). Information comparing performance on traditional paper and pencil tests to these new computerized assessment tools is needed. The purpose of this presentation is to review aspects of electronic cognitive assessments and data from three studies comparing them to paper and pencil versions. Additionally, the presenters will share information about participants’ perceptions of the use of electronic cognitive assessments and the effect of adults’ iPad comfort on performance. Finally information about implementation of electronic cognitive assessments will be provided.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to list three potential benefits of electronic cognitive assessment tools, list aspects of electronic cognitive assessments that should be interpreted with caution, describe the relationship between iPad comfort and performance on some electronic cognitive assessments.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

8:30 am - 12:00 pm

Short Course 9 - Curriculum-Based Evaluations for Students With Language Disorders

Jayne Brandel, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Virginia University

School-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) evaluate a large range of language skills associated with students' academic performance. SLPs are expected to correlate evaluation activities and results with academic requirements as outlined in the Pennsylvania State Academic Standards. This short course will assist SLPs in pairing standardized tests with academically relevant non-standardized activities so as to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and development of academically relevant goals.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to explain the impact of language skills in regards to academic performance and the Pennsylvania State Academic Standards, understand the constraints of standardized language tests, identify relevant non-standardized language activities for academically relevant evaluations.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 10 - Managing Unilateral, Mild, Moderate and Fluctuating Hearing Losses

Carol Flexer, PhD, CCC-A, F-AAA, The University of Akron

Families, school personnel and medical personnel often have difficulty recognizing the needs of children with mild, unilateral, fluctuating and moderate hearing losses. Because these children seem to hear and function in some situations, it is difficult for families and school personnel to understand their auditory barriers. While these children hear loud speech and speech close by in a quiet environment, they do not hear soft speech or hear well in competing noise or at a distance. As a result, they miss critical information. Children must have acoustic accessibility throughout the day to facilitate auditory brain development and to enable them to use audition to learn language and develop literacy. The following items will be discussed during this presentation, auditory brain development from a research to practice perspective; academic and social learning issues for each of mild, unilateral, fluctuating and moderate hearing losses; progressive hearing loss; counseling strategies for families, schools, physicians and the children themselves; specific technology needs including use of personal hearing aids and remote microphone technology; parent-focused auditory enrichment intervention; current research on auditory and educational issues, psychoeducational complication and the significance of fatigue on children with these hearing losses.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to discuss auditory brain development from a research to practice perspective, describe the needs of children with unilateral, mild, moderate and fluctuating hearing losses, explain strategies that can assist families and schools in managing the auditory barriers of children with unilateral, mild, moderate and fluctuating hearing losses, discuss technology fitting strategies for children with unilateral, mild, moderate and fluctuating hearing losses.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 11 - Functional Brain Injury Treatment Across the Severity and Setting Continuum

Erin Mattingly, MA, CCC-SLP, CBIS, Enterprise Resource Performance, Incorporated

Across rehabilitation settings, speech-language pathology (SLP) intervention for the rehabilitation of cognitive-communication impairment following acquired brain injury (ABI) begins with evaluation and ideally ends with generalization and carryover of strategies. Throughout rehabilitation, it is important that a clinician incorporate functional goals, unique to each patient. Studies have shown that when customized treatment tasks are utilized, patients engage in active, effortful processing of information and tasks, leading to improved outcomes (Riley and Heaton, 2000; Riley, Sotiriou and Jaspal, 2004; Sohlberg and Turkstra, 2011; Stark, Stark and Gordon, 2005; Zlotowitz, Fallow, Illingworth, Liu, Greenwood and Papps, 2010). Utilizing a functional, customizable, non-workbook approach to acquired brain injury rehabilitation, across the injury severity continuum, supports patient goals and ideally leads to improved generalization of skills. This short course directly addresses clinical care techniques for patients in coma to concussion, while discussing the need for continued research into the areas of functional rehabilitation.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to define measures of ABI severity, list three functional treatment tasks for traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors in the intensive care unit, describe three community re-entry tasks for survivors of TBI.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 12 - Stuttering Assessment and Treatment: A Comprehensive Approach, Part 1

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Marshall University

Part one will focus on a brief review of current evidence in stuttering research, followed by comprehensive information on the assessment process across the lifespan. Participants will be able to take information and apply it in their clinical settings. This short course will include opportunities for attendees to gain practice in the assessment and treatment procedures.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe the components of comprehensive stuttering assessment and treatment, identify treatment goals for people who stutter throughout the lifespan, practice specific assessment and treatment principles in small group settings.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Seminar 20 - Reading Between the Lines: Facilitating Comprehension for Readers With ASD

Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Reading comprehension is a critical skill for success in academic, social and vocational settings. However, comprehension problems for readers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are often overlooked during the period when most children are learning to read, masked by strong decoding skills (hyperlexia), a good memory for specific facts and an understanding of concrete content. As individuals progress in school and into academia or the workplace, the content of what they must read to be successful becomes increasingly complex and abstract, putting them at risk for frustration and failure across all settings. This seminar will provide an overview of how the core deficits of individuals with ASD impact on the development of later reading comprehension followed by discussion and demonstration of assessment techniques and evidence-based strategies for facilitating comprehension for readers with ASD. Note that the strategies for assessment and intervention provided in this seminar will focus primarily on older readers (third to twelfth grade and beyond).

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to compare and contrast the development of reading for individuals who are typically developing and those with ASD as it relates to later reading comprehension, identify and apply appropriate methods for assessment of comprehension for readers with ASD, implement evidence-based strategies for facilitating comprehension for older readers with ASD.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 21 - Taking the Pulse of Healthcare

Joanne Wisely, MA, CCC-SLP, FNAP, Genesis Rehab Services

Regardless of the setting serviced, health care reform impacts access to care, professional service patterns and provider payment. Within government funded health care, there have never been more changes to service models and payment structures than those currently experienced under the Medicaid and Medicare programs. When these are paired with the assorted private insurance plans and managed care programs, the volume of requirements and service criteria becomes mind-boggling. Developed in collaboration with the American Speech-Language Hearing Association State Advocates for Medicare Policy Network, this seminar addresses the overall status of our health care system and how today's professional can best function within these new parameters. Suggestions are shared to address the increasing challenges presented by the health care reform movement, its impact on care delivery, the essentials of inter-professional practice and the clinical complexities of population health management. Several alternative payment systems are discussed relative to established and pending legislation, current and proposed regulations as well as the assorted medical documentation and provider payment requirements. Considerations to stimulate a valued treatment experience are shared, and the importance of care planning with measurable goals and functional outcomes will be discussed. Several statutory, private and ASHA resources are provided and time within the seminar is allocated for participants to discuss additional needs and educational requests from the ASHA StAMP Network.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to name the components of the CMS Triple Aim, several health care innovation projects and alternative payment models, describe varying types of health care programs and respective provider requirements, identify professional and payer resources to facilitate quality care, measurable goals and functional outcomes, locate resources and references related to health care practice.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Seminar 22 - ASHA and PSHA Peeps: We’ve Got Game!

Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This presentation by PSHA member and ASHA president-elect Shari Robertson will engage participants in discussions regarding ASHA and PSHA member benefits, new ASHA initiatives, hot topics in the professions and opportunities to lead, advocate and volunteer in support of our associations and the clients they serve. Participants will also have the opportunity to ask questions and provide input that will be shared with the ASHA Board of Directors. Come ready to get in the game!

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to recognize opportunities to volunteer and lead in local, state, and national venues, list at least five ASHA and/or PSHA member benefits or new ASHA initiatives, identify three legislative and/or regulatory advocacy issues important to members.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Seminar 23 - Feeding and Swallowing in Adults With Physical and Intellectual Impairments

Kathleen Helfrich-Miller, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rehabilitation Specialists

Adults with physical and intellectual challenges present unique challenges in terms of feeding and swallowing. These individuals often lack the ability to communicate the difficulties they are having in swallowing and are unable to independently implement compensatory strategies. These individuals are often misunderstood by physicians, nurses, general hospital staff and long-term caregivers. This presentation highlights the challenges and offers some solutions to prevent choking, aspiration and the unnecessary use of tube feedings in these individuals. It is important to understand abnormal reflex activity as it relates to feeding and swallowing. Reflexes like an asymmetrical tonic reflex (ATNR), tongue thrust, jaw thrust, bite reflex as well as low and high tone issues affect the ability to eat safely. Many of these reflexes can be handled with compensatory strategies taught to families and caregivers. There is a "hands-on" part to this presentation, and everyone is encouraged to bring a drink and/or a cookie to the presentation.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe the process of oral vs. pharyngeal impairments in individuals with physical and intellectual impairments, identify abnormal reflex activity that contributes to increased choking, identify ways to stimulate more mature swallowing and decrease choking, aspiration and the need for tube feedings.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 24 - Developing Knowledge and Skills in Clinical Supervision for Practitioners

Patricia Mayro, MA, CCC-SLP, Robert Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, Salus University

The shortage of available clinical supervisors for graduate practicums and fellowships is a formidable problem nationwide. Research shows that experienced practitioners hesitate to accept supervisory duties due to obstacles such as lack of training and absence of perceived benefit to the supervisor. In response to the concerns of practicing speech-language pathologists and audiologists, and in light of new requirements for continuing education in supervision established by the Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the authors have developed a plan to address the training aspects of supervision. Included in this presentation is a proposal for establishing a regional mentors’ network that will assist new and experienced clinicians to answer the call to support graduate students and clinical fellows (CF) by providing them with the tools needed to be successful supervisors.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to state ASHA requirements and regulations for clinical supervision and CF mentoring, identify the best practices in supervising graduate students and mentoring CFs, select alternate solutions to perceived roadblocks in clinical supervision and fellowship mentoring.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 25 - Parallels and Overlap in TBI and Psychological Health Disorders

Erin Mattingly, MA, CCC-SLP, CBIS, Enterprise Resource Performance Incorporated

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a variety of psychological health (PH) diagnoses often have similar symptoms including executive dysfunction, memory impairment, word finding difficulty and other language and speech characteristics, pragmatic impairment and attention deficits. This seminar will address the parallels in symptoms of TBI and specific PH diagnosis, including comorbidity; the necessity of counseling skills in the speech-language pathologist (SLP); how an SLP can evaluate and treat patients with cognitive communication disorders resulting from TBI and PH comorbidity and finally, a case example from a military patient.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify three common symptoms of TBI and PH disorders, identify three specific PH disorders with resulting cognitive communication disorders, list three counseling skills beneficial for all treating SLPs.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Short Course 13 - Treatment of Language Disorders: What to do After Conversation

Jayne Brandel, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Virginia University

Students with language disorders have persisting difficulties within the academic setting in both the oral and written context. Speech-language pathologists in the schools have the opportunity to develop academically based language goals with progress monitoring directly tied to performance within the classroom. Effective academic interventions to address skills such as vocabulary, organization and complex sentences across a variety of genres (e.g., narrative and expository) will be reviewed as well as various service delivery models to improve generalization.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify academic skills impacted by deficits in vocabulary, sentence structure and organization in both the oral and written language, develop academically relevant goals that are anchored in the Pennsylvania State Academic Standards, select appropriate interventions and progress monitoring based upon the student's goals, identify different service delivery models appropriate for various students' goals.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 14 - Hearing Loss, Executive Functions and ToM: Audiologists and SLPs Collaborate

Carol Flexer, PhD, CCC-A, F-AAA, The University of Akron

This presentation will feature a research to practice format. The first part of the talk will be devoted to a discussion of executive functions. Executive functions, mediated through the frontal lobe, involve planning, decision making and above all, inhibiting inappropriate and/or ineffective behaviors. Executive functions then will be linked to Theory of Mind (ToM) for the second part of the talk. ToM is the capacity to infer other people’s mental states, and to use this information to predict behavior. Information will apply to all children with an emphasis on children with hearing loss. The collaborative roles of the speech-language pathologist and audiologist in the advancement of a child’s executive functions and ToM will be discussed. Participants will take home strategies for "growing the child’s brain” for social-emotional enrichment and for the development of executive functions.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to illustrate the impact of language and social exposure on the development of executive functions, define ToM development in children with hearing loss, discuss the collaborative roles of the SLP and audiologist in the advancement of a child’s executive functions and ToM, detail informal instructional strategies for facilitating listening, literacy and social-emotional development in infants and children.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Short Course 15 - Stuttering Assessment and Treatment: A Comprehensive Approach, Part 2

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Marshall University

Part two will focus on stuttering intervention throughout the lifespan. Assessment and treatment principles discussed will help clinicians to focus on the entire stuttering disorder, including negative reactions and impact on communication. Participants will be able to take information and apply it in their clinical settings. This short course will include opportunities for attendees to gain practice in the assessment and treatment procedures.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to, describe the components of comprehensive stuttering assessment and treatment, identify treatment goals for people who stutter throughout the lifespan, practice specific assessment and treatment principles in small group settings.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm

Seminar 26 - What's Your Lens? Instrumentation and Advocacy in Dysphagia Management

James Lemma, MA, CCC-SLP, East Coast Dysphagia Management, LLC; Pamela Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP, Bloomsburg University

Instrumental assessment is often a necessary component of best practice and effective management of dysphagia. Conversations in social media suggest that there is not uniform agreement among speech-language pathologists (SLPs) regarding the need for instrumentation, there is difficulty obtaining instrumental assessments when needed and that advocacy efforts are difficult across the various stakeholders involved in authorizations for instrumental assessment. Clinicians find themselves pressured to create treatment plans and manage patients without the necessary information to do so appropriately, a practice that can lead to excessive and unnecessary treatment as well as potentially dangerous treatment. This presentation will focus on best practices in dysphagia and the means to reach that goal. It will begin with data from a survey of SLPs in health care settings and describe their viewpoints on the need for and challenges in obtaining instrumental assessments. It will then review ways to advocate for patients who need instrumental assessment by focusing upon the specific needs of each stakeholder in the advocacy conversation.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to state four events that can only be assessed via instrumental assessment and cannot be viewed via clinical examination, state three challenges that SLPs face when advocating for instrumental assessments, describe three ways to modify the content and manner of conversation to best communicate pertinent information to that listener.

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Seminar 27 - Service Delivery Models in Schools: Easy as 1, 2, 3?

Jennifer Geibel, MS, CCC-SLP, Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network

According to research from Cirrin and Gillam (2008), there is no evidence to suggest that a traditional service delivery model of “pull-out – twice a week for 30 minutes” is preferable to alternative speech treatment models. However, the process of shifting to a more open, flexible caseload schedule may be daunting for the school-based therapist. Speech-language pathologists may have difficulty discussing new service delivery models with their LEAs or they may struggle to organize large caseloads in unconventional ways. The purpose of this seminar is to discuss the benefits and challenges associated with various service delivery models, including push-in and pull-out, intensive models, 3:1 and consultation and “blast” models, among others. Additionally, participants will receive helpful hints on how to speak to school administration regarding changes in service model provision, as well as tips on how to proactively organize caseloads to “work smarter, not harder.” Teaming techniques and selection of service delivery models based on diagnosis and severity of impact will also be discussed. With this information in mind, though we may not be able to make service delivery provision as “easy as 1, 2, 3,” we will be able to successfully smooth the transition to more effective and creative service model delivery.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify three non-traditional service delivery models and the benefits and challenges of each, describe how to communicate with LEAS and discuss service delivery options, determine how to use organizational techniques to adjust caseloads to accommodate various service delivery models.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 28 - ICAN Talk With My Eyes: Evaluating Eye Tracking Access

Michael O'Leary, MS, CCC-SLP, ICAN Talk Clinic of the AAC Institute

Evaluating a person for eye gaze tracking is a challenging augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) access method to assess. Promotional information frequently overshadows the evidence required to guide clinical decisions for selecting eye gaze technology. Clinicians must be knowledgeable with both the features of the speech generating device (SGD) and language software as well as have the knowledge and skills to set-up, demonstrate and trial the various eye gaze technologies available commercially to match with an individual. This presentation will define, describe and classify eye gaze technology used to support access for a SGD and/or computer. Eye gaze technology varies based on the manufacturer. Due to variances in a person’s eyes and camera technology, not everyone can benefit from the same eye gaze technology. Consequently, professionals considering eye gaze as an access method for an individual, must be able to identify and compare these technology differences along with considering personal factors such as vision, cognition, language, executive function, motivation and support. The successful matching of a person with eye gaze tracking technology can help lead to desired user satisfaction and performance outcomes.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify and describe three procedures used to evaluate an individual’s ability to benefit from eye tracking as an alternative access method, identify three barriers that must be controlled to improve an individual’s learning trajectory for using eye tracking as an alternative access method, describe one specific characteristic and consideration to assess when recommending eye tracking access for patients with Rett Syndrome, ALS or Cerebral Palsy, identify three performance measures to use in writing an SGD funding request that supports the purchase of the recommended eye tracking access method.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Saturday, March 24

8:00 am - 9:30 am

Seminar 29 - Implementing Evidence-Based Pediatric AAC Language Intervention

Katya Hill, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

Building the language competence of a child with a severe and complex communication disorder who uses augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technology is one of the most important challenges facing a speech-language pathologist (SLP). This seminar uses two peer-reviewed frameworks that support evidence-based AAC intervention. The AAC Language-Based Intervention framework is used to provide a theoretically driven process for designing AAC intervention and selecting specially designed instructional strategies. The Matching Persons With Technology Primary, Secondary and Tertiary (PST) Features framework supports the systematic and principled approach to manipulating the features that influences how language is represented and generated using a speech generating device (SGD). Language competence impacts the potential for a child to develop literacy skills, advance educationally and achieve a higher quality of life. Case study data is presented to demonstrate implementation of the language-based and PST Feature frameworks for children using AAC who are transitioning through one of three stages: pragmatics to semantic, semantics to syntax and phonology to metaphonology. For each case, an overview of the clinical and personal evidence gathered to identify and monitor language gains is discussed. Specifically, decisions about the variables the SLP and interprofessional team members manipulated in regards to instructional approaches and AAC technology is highlighted focusing on vocabulary, grammar and sentence structures and language functions. Methods and resources to collect performance and outcomes data are compared.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify four out of eight steps of the Language-Based Assessment and Intervention framework, identify the components associated with each of the AAC primary, secondary and tertiary features, describe procedures to implement a language-based intervention approach for children at various transitions of development, describe three specially designed instructional strategies to build the language competence of a child using AAC technology.

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Seminar 30 - Early Intervention Service Delivery in Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing

Marcel L. Paules-Broadway, MS, CCC-SLP, Cindy Miles and Associates

This seminar will take a practical avenue for the early intervention speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to begin providing oral feeding and swallowing therapy services for the birth-to-three population and their families. Given medical advances, more premature infants are surviving beyond the neonatal intensive care unit and have more complicated developmental and feeding impairments. Parents are becoming more knowledgeable as SLPs are becoming more involved in early feeding and swallowing clients. This discussion is designed for the SLPs newly introduced into early intervention, situations with minimal guidance of a mentor, complex cases with ties to sensory deficits, working with multiple interventionists and how to communicate with them, and how to communicate and work with extended family members. Practical information on starting or increasing their knowledge base, how to maintain professionalism in multiple settings and suggestions on conflict resolution or unfamiliar or uncomfortable situations/conversations will be provided, as well as how to elicit positive outcomes. Case studies and real-life examples will be given to provide a helpful but light-hearted approach to increase interest, motivation and desire to work in this challenging environment. Practical indications for referrals, oral motor milestones in feeding, equipment and supplies, sensory involved dysphagia and resource guides will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to list items recommended to safely provide home-based feeding and swallowing therapy to medically fragile children, describe the oral sensory needs of medically fragile pediatric patients, explain the need and support for caregiver involvement in home-based feeding therapy programs.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

9:45 am - 11:15 am

Seminar 31 - Using Speech Science to Improve Clinical Decision Making in MSD

Susan Shaiman, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

This seminar will demonstrate how speech science aids in clinical decision making and enhances evidence-based practice when working with patients with motor speech disorders. Clinically accessible software/techniques will be emphasized. Case presentations will highlight the positive impact and critical role of speech science knowledge on evaluation, task creation and treatment delivery.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to explain and appreciate how knowledge of acoustic, physiologic, kinematic and perceptual processes can directly influence clinical decision making, treatment preparation and delivery in patients with motor speech disorders, describe the contribution of select instrumental measures to treatment planning, describe how speech science can be integrated into their clinical practice and inform and guide therapeutic tasks and their delivery to clients.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

9:45 am - 12:45 pm

Short Course 16 - Breathing, ICUs and the Future of Our Profession

James Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, University of Pittsburgh

This short course will propose that the medical speech-language pathologist functions in several roles, each with different, necessary and complementary ways of thinking, and some unfamiliar based on our professional education. The course will review the evolution of medical speech-language pathology, highlight the importance of clinician understanding of disease characteristics and medical record information, and underscore the importance of the clinician’s hard-wired integration of aerodigestive structure and function, not just how the aerodigestive system produces speech, into patient management. Future directions for the profession specific to practice in medical settings will be discussed. The SLP role as diagnostician will be highlighted with a presentation of current evidence regarding assessment of critically ill patients in intensive care units. The SLP's part-role as "therapist" will be underscored and a treatment taxonomy under development by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association will be presented, with an emphasis on elimination of use of the title "speech therapist." Current and future threats to our profession will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to list historical factors leading to our profession's current state of professional practice, compare and contrast the nature of restrictive and obstructive pulmonary diseases and their different effects on speech and swallowing, integrate current knowledge regarding assessment of the adult patient in the intensive care unit (ICU) into ICU assessments, include patient cognitive and affective representations of proposed treatment into intervention plans.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

8:00 am – 1:00 pm

Tech Session 1 - You’re About to Graduate–Now What?! Preparing for your CFE

Erin Clark, MS, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

For students, getting to graduation following completion of coursework, internships/externships and, for some, national exams, seems to be the culmination of their hard work. However, graduation is just the beginning of the next step: the Clinical Fellowship Experience (CFE). Beyond just finding a job, selecting a location and mentor are critical to a positive CFE. This technical session will review the requirements and paperwork for completion of the CFE for both the mentor and mentee. In addition, students will be provided with tips to be utilized during the interview process to assist in evaluating the location and staff as a potential clinical fellowship placement. Pennsylvania’s provisional licensure and licensure requirements will be addressed. An interactive, interview style format will be utilized to engage participants.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to state the mentorship requirements as specified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, locate all required paperwork for completion of the CFE and Pennsylvania licensure, list questions to ask prospective employers to evaluate it as a potential CF site.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Tech Session 2 - Considerations for Assessing Children Who Are ELL

Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates that “testing and evaluation materials and procedures … shall be provided and administered in the child’s native language or modes of communication, unless it clearly is not feasible to do so.” This indicates that all school-based speech-language pathologists are required to assess a child in his or her native language in order to determine whether or not he or she qualifies for speech and language support services. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide information regarding various aspects of the process of assessing children whose first language is not English. This includes the recruitment of translators and bilingual paraprofessionals to participate in the assessment, the selection of appropriate assessment tools and the interpretation of assessment results. It will also address how to determine language dominance, in order that assessment can take place in the appropriate language. In addition, the presentation will address considerations for gathering pertinent case history information and for interviewing clients and their families. Examples of case history and interview questions for second language learners will be presented. The session will also include the use of culturally sensitive practices for gathering information and interacting with families. Finally, the presentation will address the collection and analysis of language sample data. Patterns of language transference and the methods for distinguishing between language differences versus language disability will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify when it is appropriate to assess a child's language skills solely in English, describe how the assessment process may be altered to accommodate cultural differences, identify resources that are helpful in the assessment of culturally and linguistically diverse clients.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Tech Session 3 - Supporting Literacy in Communication: Visual Scene Displays With Dynamic Text

Lauramarie Pope, MA, Penn State University; Christine Holyfield, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Arkansas; Janice Light, PhD, Faculty Advisor, Penn State University, David McNaughton, PhD, Penn State University

Literacy skills are essential for full participation in educational, social and vocational pursuits in the 21st Century (Mikulecky, 1982; Taylor, 1989; Light and McNaughton, 2013). However, literacy expectations have traditionally been low for individuals with complex communication needs who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) (Light and McNaughton, 1993). Adults with cognitive or speech disabilities are far more likely than the general population to lack functional literacy skills (Kirsch, Jungeblut, Jenkins and Kolstad, 1993), and approximately 90 percent of individuals with complex communication needs do not enter adulthood with functional literacy skills (Foley and Wolter, 2010). This study explored the effect of exposure to dynamically displayed text with associated speech output within a visual scene display-based AAC system on the sight word recognition of an adult with Down syndrome and emergent literacy skills. The design of the AAC system and intervention drew on tenets of visual cognitive science, effective literacy instruction and personalized study design. The participant demonstrated accurate sight word recognition of all 10 targeted words as a result of exposure to the application, and maintained those skills one and two months following the end of intervention. The results of this study suggest that older individuals with complex communication needs and emergent literacy skills can and do learn sight words through exposure to text paired with the attendant spoken and graphic referents. However, this intervention is intended to supplement, not replace, formal literacy instruction.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to list three reasons why literacy is essential to those who use AAC, identify target populations for whom this technology would be appropriate, operate the technology application with basic proficiency.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Tech Session 4 - fNIRS and ANS Data Across Stimulus Durations in Speech Tasks

Danielle Spagnuolo; Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP; Brianna Spilsbury; Chantal Whiteduck; Anna Hershey, from Misericordia University; Rickson Mesquita, PhD, University of Campinas; Sergio Novi, University of Campinas

Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging tool that examines changes in hemoglobin concentration in the brain. The response to stimuli in the brain, the hemodynamic response, can allow brain activation to be inferred. The time of this response is important to understand, as it guides understanding of speech and the brain gained from fNIRS. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is responsible for the body’s “fight or flight” response to external stimuli. A study measuring the effect of stimulus duration on the hemodynamic response in speech production will be discussed. Understanding the effect of stimulus duration on the hemodynamic response in fNIRS and changes in the ANS during speech will provide an effective method of examining changes in the body during speech production tasks. With this knowledge, researchers will be able to more effectively use fNIRS and ANS data to investigate changes in the brain as a result of therapy. In this presentation, possible uses for fNIRS in speech-language pathology and applications to therapy will be discussed. Further research and limitations will also be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to explain what fNIRS is, explain the function of the autonomic nervous system, discuss possible uses for fNIRS and ANS data in speech-language pathology.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Tech Session 5 - Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in Speech-Language Pathology Students

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University; Orlando Barone, MA, University of Pittsburgh; Danielle Spagnuolo; Brianna Spilsbury; Chantal Whiteduck; Anna Hershey, from Misericordia University

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a test that is used to assess personality characteristics. A person’s MBTI personality type can be useful in evaluating possible career choices, learning styles, and how individuals approach the facets of their professions. However, there is limited data investigating how individuals pursuing a degree in speech-language pathology score in relation to personality type. This study consisted of approximately 250 speech-language pathology students enrolled in a graduate-level speech-language pathology program. The test was administered in a classroom setting. Results of this study showed a general trend of speech-language pathology students having a Myers-Briggs personality type of ESFJ. These types of people are extroverted, take in information by sensing the environment, make decisions based on feelings and deal with the world by judging it. Applications to learning and teaching styles in differing personality types will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to describe the common personality traits of speech-language pathology students, state how teaching styles can change based on personality type, understand how knowledge of personality type can influence learning.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Tech Session 6 - Determining Typically Fluent Speakers’ Comfort Levels to Different Dysfluencies

The purpose of this study was to identify the differences of psychophysiological responses of typically fluent speakers (TFS) when presented with the three types of core dysfluencies: prolongations, repetitions and blocks. This study provides insight into the comfort levels of TFS as they listen to and observe people who stutter (PWS). Mindware Technologies was used to assess autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses of TFS as they watched videos of a PWS. Mindware measures the ANS through obtaining heart rate, skin conductance and respiration rate from participants who are connected to the device. Mindware utilizes nine electrodes which are placed on a participant’s torso and hands. To obtain a baseline of the ANS, participants observed a video of a blank screen pre- and post-stimuli exposure. Participants observed a timed, randomized E-Prime 3.0 application suite presentation. The stimuli consisted of three videos of a person stuttering using moderate dysfluencies using part-word repetitions, prolongations and blocks for 20 seconds. Each condition occurred eight times. The videos were presented with a 20-second rest period in between to ensure each participant’s data returned to baseline before the next stimuli occurred. After ANS data was collected, participants completed a survey that evaluated how they felt about each type of dysfluency. ANS data and surveyed data were compared to determine if there was a correlation. Results indicate that TFS felt most uncomfortable during blocks and most comfortable during part word repetitions. ANS and surveyed data correlated. Implications for therapy will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to understand the impact of dysfluent speech on TFS, understand what dysfluencies cause TFS to feel the most comfortable and most uncomfortable, identify possible clinical implications of the results.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Tech Session 7 - Do Typically Fluent Speakers Feel Stressed When Observing Stuttered Speech

Noah Schweiger; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Faculty Advisor; D’manda Price; Cara Imbalzano; Elizabeth Heinmiller; Jordan Seprosky, from Misericordia University

Many persons who stutter (PWS) look away from the listener during moments of dysfluency or maintain poor eye-contact when speaking. Eye contact is an important component of stuttering treatment that many clinicians emphasize; therefore, we wanted to determine whether typically fluent speaking (TFS) listeners prefer PWS to keep eye contact with a listener or to break eye contact while speaking. The results of this study provide clinicians and researchers insight about the importance of eye contact in PWS while they speak. In this study, Mindware Technologies was used to assess the measurements of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Mindware measures the ANS by obtaining heart rate, skin conductance and breathing cycle through nine electrodes that are placed on each participant.This study focused on the stress responses of 17 TFS while they observed PWS during conversational speech. The participants were asked to refrain from consuming caffeine, nicotine and alcohol as well as being scheduled within three hours of a stressful event. Before stimuli were presented, the participants viewed a blank screen to reach a baseline of the ANS. The participants then viewed eight examples of PWS or TFS divided by the following criteria: control/experimental—>eye contact/no eye contact—>TFS/PWS—>men/women. Each condition was separated by a blank screen to allow baseline to be reached again. Results indicated that the TFS participants, on average, had a higher stress response when viewing both TFS and PWS when not keeping eye contact. Thus, eye contact is more comforting to viewers of a conversation.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to understand the impact of eye contact on TFS viewing a PWS, understand what type of eye contact TFS find the most comfortable: maintaining eye contact vs no eye contact during a conversation, identify possible clinical implications for the use of this information.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Tech Session 8 - Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury: A Unique Opportunity for SLPs

Maureen Skaates, MS, CCC-SLP, Shriners Hospitals for Children

Children with spinal cord injuries require speech-language pathologists to have a vast knowledge base. Because these children rely heavily on assistive technology, it is necessary to "think outside the box,” and provide creative and unique ways to address feeding, swallowing and communication. A basic understanding of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), specifically using eye gaze access is essential. Cervical spinal cord injury often results in tracheostomy and/or ventilator dependence. Knowledge of dysphagia and Passy Muir Valve is essential. This technical session will give an overview of the skills needed to work with this unique and rewarding population. Special attention will be paid to the usage of assistive technology to aid in expressive communication, feeding and swallowing.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to name three alternative access methods for using AAC, describe two ways to maximize verbal communication in the ventilator dependent patient, describe the relationship between spinal cord injury and dysphagia, describe the partnership between SLP and occupational therapy in developing feeding/swallowing goals.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Tech Session 9 - Development of an Online Naming Therapy for Bilingual Aphasia

Tia Spagnuolo, BS, Misericordia University; Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Faculty Advisor, Misericordia University; Jessica Kisenwether, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University; Denis Anson, MS, Misericordia University

There is a pressing need for a multicultural approach to aphasia therapy for persons who are bilingual and have aphasia. The population in the US is becoming increasingly bilingual, the bilingual population at risk for aphasia from stroke is growing and the bilingual population is currently underserved. Combined, these facts point to a current and developing health disparity issue. The goal of this project is to make evidence-based naming therapy for bilingual aphasia freely available and easily accessible for speech-language pathologists who provide services to bilingual persons with aphasia, but do not have access to evidence-based therapy materials that are culturally and linguistically appropriate for their clients. In a series of studies conducted in several languages, Kiran and colleagues demonstrated not only direct training effects, but also within and between language generalization effects using a semantic feature-based naming therapy (e.g., Kiran et al., 2013). This project seeks to support the wide use of this therapy by making the protocols, with linguistically and culturally appropriate stimuli, freely available online for multiple languages. Using a crowdsourcing tool available on Amazon, we are currently verifying translation, category fit and semantic feature applicability for more than 600 words and features in 11 languages. The existing protocol for the semantic feature-based treatment used by Kiran and colleagues has been converted into an online interactive naming therapy and made freely available on a website created for the purpose of dissemination. We will invite clinicians and clinical researchers to use the website and provide feedback for its continued improvement.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to define bilingual aphasia, recognize the need and importance of linguistically and culturally appropriate therapy materials for bilingual persons with aphasia, identify the purpose and benefits of semantic feature-based naming therapy for bilingual persons with aphasia, identify the therapy protocol available on the bilingual naming therapy website.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Tech Session 10 - Audiological Manifestations of Inflammatory Diseases/a>

Susan Dillmuth-Miller, AuD, CCC-A; Luann Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP, from East Stroudsburg University; Emily Doll, MS, CCC-SLP, Intermedia Unit 20; Kerry Adams, East Stroudsburg University

Rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation in joints, muscles and for some organs of the body including the brain. Many are considered immune mitigated diseases. Hearing loss has been found in patients with rheumatic diseases, although results range considerably. Because the middle ear is comprised of muscles, joints and cartilage, rheumatic diseases have the potential to affect middle ear function as well as the inner ear due to inflammation, reduced vascularity and ototoxic medications used to treat rheumatic diseases. Audiological manifestations reported in published studies range considerably. These variations in results can be explained not only by methodology differences but also lack of consistency in the hearing evaluation protocols. Many studies deviated from the standard protocol deemed best practice by the national audiological credentialing organizations. This likely occurred because the published studies largely were not conducted by audiologists or with an audiologist on the research team. Published studies reported the incidence of hearing loss based on subjective reports rather than a hearing test, screening results rather than a diagnostic evaluation or an evaluation which limited the frequency range tested. This presentation will discuss current research findings, the challenges of conducting research in this area and the preliminary findings of an on-going research project which evaluated patients with rheumatic diseases following a comprehensive audiological evaluation including a screening for central auditory processing. The audiologist’s role in assessment and management of clients with rheumatic disease will be discussed.

At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to define rheumatic disease, identify areas of possible auditory deficits associated with rheumatic disease, identify appropriate measures for audiological assessment and management in clients with rheumatic disease.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

 

Pennsylvania Speech Language Hearing Association
700 McKnight Park Drive, Suite 708 | Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15237
412-366-9858 | 412-366-8804 fx
psha@psha.org
ASHA.org
 
©2010 Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association | All rights reserved.