2023 Convention – Session Descriptions

Wednesday, April 12

6:30 pm-7:30 pm

Session 1 PSHA Town Hall Meeting

Louise Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP, PSHA President

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of PSHA Executive Board members to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology, including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs and state licensure requirements. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Audience members will be given an opportunity to ask questions and contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the history of Pennsylvania licensure and certification requirements related to the schools.
  • Identify at least three issues impacting service delivery.
  • List pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

8:15 pm-9:15 pm

Session 2 Professional Roundtable Discussions

These discussions will provide an opportunity for professionals to engage in dynamic roundtables to discuss important workplace issues with colleagues from across the state. We will have several roundtables to choose from including: early Intervention, school setting, acute/rehab setting, skilled nursing facility/home health, higher education and audiology. Each discussion will have a facilitator to encourage discussion points. It will be a great opportunity to share best practices, concerns and questions with colleagues in similar work settings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe concerns facing professionals in specific work settings.
  • Describe best practices for assessment, treatment and documentation.
  • Describe strategies to improve professional service delivery.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Thursday, April 13

8:00 am-9:00 am

Session 3 - DEI Aphasia Disparities: Who, What, When, Where and Why Do They Exist

Charles Ellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Florida

Disparities in clinical outcomes have received significant attention since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, contemporary research has consistently shown that individuals with a range of communication disorders also experience disparities in outcomes that exist along race/ethnicity, sex/gender and residence (rural vs. urban). These issues are of significant concern given the aging US population and greater predisposition to neurologically based disorders of communication such as aphasia. The current literature has consistently shown that disparities in outcomes exist among multiple dimensions. However, the field has not consistently identified the origin of these disparities nor the complexity of factors likely to contribute to the observed disparate outcomes. This presentation has been designed to explore the complexity of factors potentially contributing to observed aphasia disparities and specific targets that be important to investigate in attempts to close the disparity gaps that exist.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the demographics of persons with aphasia in America.
  • List and describe disparities in aphasia outcomes.
  • Describe ways to achieve equity in aphasia outcomes and reduce the current disparity gaps that exist.

Time Ordered Agenda:
8:00 a.m. – The Demographics of Aphasia in America
8:15 a.am. – Disparities in Aphasia Outcomes
8:30 a.m. – Issues of Access and Equity in Aphasia
8:40 a.m. – Achieving Equity in Aphasia
8:50 a.m. – Conclusions

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 4 Core vs. Pragmatic Language Systems: Super Core and Voco Chat

Andrea King, MA, CCC-SLP, Smartbox Assistive Technology

Augmentative and alternative communication systems, specifically symbol-based language systems on speech generating devices, are derived from varying theories underwriting their organization. We will investigate two symbol-based language systems from Smartbox: Super Core as a core-based approach, and Voco Chat as a pragmatic-based approach. While organized differently, they both support independent and autonomous communication while lending themselves to empirical and clinically supported implementation strategies. During this session, we will discuss features of these grid sets, who might benefit from each approach, and give in-depth tours of Super Core and Voco Chat to help clarify the similarities and differences between them.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe one difference between a core-based approach and a pragmatic-based approach.
  • Compare one key difference between SuperCore and VocoChat.
  • Identify a client population that would benefit from Voco Chat and SuperCore, respectively.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 5SLPs as Authors: The Art and Science of Writing Children's Books for Preschoolers

Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL

Literature-based intervention has been recommended as a best practice to support language and literacy goals for children with language delays for more than 25 years. Given their unique expertise in both typical and delayed speech and language development, SLPs are ideal candidates to author children’s books. Guided by the empirical evidence regarding the specific qualities of books that determine positive outcomes, this seminar will provide potential, budding and closet SLP authors with key information on how to create children’s books that provide optimal support for speech, language and preliteracy goals. Apply the research, find your inspiration, release your inner-author and let your imagination take flight!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize key findings of the empirical literature base related to the elements of children’s literature that support positive therapeutic outcomes.
  • Analyze children’s books by SLP authors to identify research-supported characteristics that facilitate speech, language and pre-literacy development.
  • Apply concepts to create/self-author children’s books for preschoolers.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

8:00 am-9:30 am

Session 6 -DEIConsiderations for Nonbinary Voice Care

AC Goldberg, PhD, CCC-SLP

What is a nonbinary voice? Not all nonbinary people or genders are the same, and we as SLPs need to develop knowledge and skills to serve all who seek our services. This session will equip participants to serve the nonbinary community with a deeper understanding of gender, voice and the interplay of self-expression through thoughtful, trauma-informed rapport building between client and clinician.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three different nonbinary identities.
  • Explain how code switching relates to gender expression.
  • List the tenets of trauma informed care.

Time Ordered Agenda

8:00 am-8:05 am:  Introduction
8:05 am-8:10 am:  Terminology and Gender Discussions
8:10 am-8:35 am:  Vocal Sets and Situational Switching
8:35 am-8:50 am:  Exploration
8:50 am-9:05 am:  Managing Expectations
9:05 am-9:20 am:  Conclusions
9:20 am-9:30 am:  Questions

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 7Working on R Doesn’t Work

Susan Haseley, MS, CCC-SLP, Artic Bites, LLC

Stop failing at the R sound. This session will be very different than others that you have attended. You will learn to address your client’s individual needs, how to get the articulators in position and get your client to repeat his R productions in a meaningful way. You will become partners with your clients. Therapy is exhilarating when the client can discuss their errors with the clinician and do so accurately!

Our evidence-based focus will help determine why our clients don’t improve and help determine the treatment to help the most motorically challenged student improve. We know how busy all speech-language pathologists are. When treatment is meaningful, effective and organized, you will have time to do your job during work hours. When you dismiss five to eight children yearly, you will have time to schedule and complete the remainder of your necessary duties, thus reducing the number of reports written at home on weekends. You and your clients deserve better. Your students will learn a strategy to determine the accuracy of their sounds, repeat correct and incorrect sounds and analyze what went wrong as needed. In this session, you will have fun producing incorrect R and figuring out how others made an inaccurate R. We’ll discuss the current research and apply it to your daily therapy sessions. The research presented should help you justify serving students for the R sound and show how you can reduce the time spent on this single sound.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the actual cost of keeping students in speech for many years for one sound.
  • Determine the cause of different R mistakes and determine the necessary movement needed for remediation.
  • Identify various tactile tools to become a better product consumer.
  • Identify traditional versus tactile types of R remediation to help determine how to best serve their client’s needs.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

8:00 am-11:30 am

Session 8 Awesome Ways to Increase Communication and Participation for Students With Complex Needs

Emily McCarthy, MS, CCC-SLP; Julie Marzano, OTD, OTR/L, from Fine Motor Boot Camp, LLC

Related service providers, teachers, paraprofessionals and parents often struggle to meet the needs of individuals with complex needs. Learn how to use a strengths-based approach to guide active AND meaningful participation for our students with multiple disabilities/complex needs. Let’s focus on what our students CAN DO and “think outside the box” to not only increase participation but allow meaningful interactions, communication and access! Here you will learn ways to teach, adapt and modify everyday games/activities and instructional materials to better meet your students’ needs. You will also learn to meet the participatory needs of your students using both direct and indirect access methods along with a plethora of other ideas and hacks. Attend and leave re-energized, creative and with activities that are cost effective and easily adapted.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define “Active Participation” for students with complex needs.
  • Define “Presuming Competence” AKA “Presuming Potential” for students with multiple and complex needs.
  • Identify strategies on how to use switches to increase participation in ADL’s, group, math, ELA, vocation and recreation/leisure.
  • Define how to differentiate curriculum and activities to increase active participation for students with multiple and complex needs.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

9:15 am-9:45 am

Tech Session 1 In It for the Long Haul: Evolution of Post-COVID Care

Cori Bortnem, MA, CCC-SLP; Susan Bolt, MS, CCC-SLP, from Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on the daily practice of speech-language pathologists across all settings and has required an unprecedented health care response. Speech-language pathologists in an outpatient rehabilitation setting provide valuable services for the care of post-COVID “long haulers” in areas of cognition, language, voice and swallow. We will use case studies to provide insight into our initial expectations vs. the clinical presentation as well as the changes that have been made as we gather new evidence and clinical experience in working with the “long hauler” population. We will discuss the unique challenges associated with the treatment of this population and the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to care.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the clinical presentation of COVID-19 “long haulers.”
  • Understanding the role of the SLP in multi-disciplinary care of a novel population.
  • Examine the importance of recognizing and releasing clinical bias.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Tech Session 2Parents Plus: A Study of Parent-Implemented Preschool Language Intervention

Julie Santoro, PhD, DeSales University; Brook Sawyer, PhD, Lehigh University; Carol Scheffner Hammer, PhD, CCC-SLP, Teachers College Columbia University; Julie Smith, MS, CCC-SLP, Teacher College Columbia University

Of the almost one million preschoolers in the US with a disability, 40 precent are diagnosed as having developmental language disorders (Hussar et al., 2020). Early intervention to improve young children’s language skills is critical because early language skills are related to school readiness and later academic success. (e.g., August & Shanahan, 2006; Dickinson & Tabors, 2001). Equipping parents with the knowledge and skills to support their preschool children’s language development has led to improved child language outcomes (e.g., Girolametto et al., 2007; Roberts et al., 2019). Yet, most trainings for parents are held in a face-to-face format that may be difficult to bring to scale (i.e., difficult for parents to attend, resource prohibitive for programs). We developed Parents Plus, an online training program, to overcome these logistical challenges. Parents Plus is comprised of app-based multimedia learning modules and remote coaching from a speech-language pathologist. Parents are taught to use focused stimulation (FS), an evidence-based language facilitation strategy (e.g., Girolametto et al., 1996; Smith-Lock et al., 2013), to facilitate their children’s vocabulary and morphosyntax. This session describes the intervention strategy, focused stimulation (FS), and how parents are coached remotely to implement FS in their daily routines. Findings about the intervention’s effectiveness, feasibility, usability, and fidelity of implementation will be reviewed. Clinical implications of the FS strategy, online parent training and remote coaching will be discussed. The current investigation, to see if Parents Plus helps accelerate children’s recovery from the pandemic, will also be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Parents Plus intervention program and Focused Stimulation strategy
  • Summarize findings on Parents Plus effectiveness.
  • Discuss clinical implications and issues related to remote intervention delivery and parent training.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Tech Session 3Your Hand Moves Right When You Hear ‘Roar’ and ‘Buzz’: Implications of Visual and Tactile Line Bisection Studies for Aphasia Therapy

Vijayachandra Ramachandra, PhD; Angela Genter; Kelli Moreno; Kirsten Van Louvender, from Marywood University

Languages are generally ‘arbitrary’ in nature. For example, in English, there is no inherent connection between the word ‘table’ and the actual entity it is referring to (the object table). So, the word-referent connections are mere associations and not symbolic. A number of languages (such as Japanese, Korean, sub-Saharan African language, etc.) and number of words in English are non-arbitrary (or iconic) in nature. For example, onomatopoeic words such as meow, oink, wham, boom, swoosh and whoof demonstrate sound-symbolism or iconicity. A neuroimaging investigation in Japanese showed that unlike arbitrary words which are processed in the left hemisphere, iconic words show high levels of activation in the right hemisphere. There are no studies to date on the hemispheric processing of iconic words in English. The effect of iconicity on spatial attention (an indirect measure of hemispheric activation) was investigated by asking healthy young adults to complete visual line bisections (N=20) and tactile rod bisections (N=20) while listening to neutral stimuli (nasal /m/) and different types of words (onomatopoeic words with and without emotions, arbitrary and sensory) and environmental sounds. Results indicate that when compared to the neutral stimuli, there was significantly more right spatial bias (more left hemisphere involvement) for onomatopoeic words (iconic) and environmental sounds. The additional semantic processing required for the categorization of these stimuli could have led to more left hemisphere processing resulting in a right spatial bias. The potential benefits of using iconic words in the treatment of people with aphasia will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss how different types of words (arbitrary, iconic, sensory) and environmental sounds are processed by the two hemispheres.
  • Discuss how inexpensive tasks such as visual and tactile line bisection can be used to understand hemispheric processing of words and nonverbal sounds.
  • Describe the benefits of using iconic words in the treatment of individuals with aphasia and other acquired language disorders.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

10:00 am-11:00 am

Session 9 UNO Group for Teens With Autism: Two-Year Outcomes

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Monmouth University; Lee Anthony, MS; Melissa Alunni, MS, CCC-SLP; Kearston Healey, MS, CCC-SLP; Lori Cimino, MS, CCC-SLP; Adina Rosenthal, MS, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University

This virtual UNO group that was established prepandemic for four teens with autism was presented at PSHA in 2020. Since that presentation, the group has continued to meet and the students have continued to grow and develop in their social communication skills via this format. This seminar will provide history and background on group development and updates on progress. What has and has not worked about the group will be presented to demonstrate clinical implications for work on social communication skills in teens with autism. Techniques for using the Floortime approach for high functioning teens in a manner that respects neurodiversity will be presented.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • State three approaches to the treatment that respect neurodiversity.
  • State one improvement of each group member over two years.
  • State two factors that are attributed to group progress.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

10:00 am-11:30 am

Session 10 Adjunct Instruction in CSD: The State of Pennsylvania

Jeanette Benigas, PhD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College; Pamela Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP, Bloomsburg University

Nationwide, over half of university faculty members are part-time employees (Anthony et al., 2020) and these numbers have grown since the late 1960s when 22 percent of faculty were adjunct (Nica, 2018). Motivations for the use of adjuncts is to provide students with necessary classroom instruction while simultaneously saving institutional resources. It also provides opportunity and experience for the adjunct faculty member. The PhD shortage is a known problem in CSD and ASHA standards require that the majority of graduate education is provided by individuals holding the terminal degree. This challenge is further complicated in Pennsylvania because we have the largest number of new SLP graduate programs in the nation. There is, therefore, a great demand for both permanent and adjunct instructors. Adjunct faculty often juggle a number of appointments at different institutions. They may not receive institutional support for professional development, to include teaching skills, support in terms of space, materials, resources or compensation for time. We will explore adjunct instruction from the viewpoint of institutions and departments, sharing data to broaden our understanding of this important issue in SLP graduate training.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three reasons that the use of adjunct instructors is rising in CSD programs.
  • Describe the current status of Pennsylvania graduate SLP education and the impact on student training.
  • Discuss three issues important to discuss in interviews for positions as an adjunct instructor.
  • Discuss methods to engage students in the teaching process given the nature and structure of adjunct instruction.

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 11 - DEIGender Affirming Voice Care in Schools, SLP Roles and Responsibilities

AC Goldberg, PhD, CCC-SLP

SLPs play a critical role in enabling students to communicate in school, allowing them full access to curricular and social opportunities. This session will discuss the SLP’s role in providing gender affirming voice care in school settings, from legal considerations to adolescent development. We will discuss the basics of assessment and treatment as they related to the IEP and 504 process. Participants will come away from this session equipped with the tools they need to work with their own teams, including administrators, in order to assure this service is available to those who need it.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List legal protections for transgender students in schools.
  • Describe evaluation and treatment related to gender affirming voice in adolescents.
  • Identify action steps to making this service available in their districts.

Time Ordered Agenda

10:00 am-10:05 am: Introduction
10:05 am-10:10 am: Terminology
10:10 am-10:25 am: Intersectional Considerations
10:25 am-10:35 am: Legal Protections (state and federal)
10:35 am-10:55 am: Process and Service Provision
10:55 am-11:10 am: Working with Guardians, TEAMS & Admin
11:10 am-11:20 am: Navigating Sensitive Conversations
11:20 am-11:30 am: Conclusions and Questions

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 12“Speed Speech”: How (and Why) to Treat Articulation in 5 Min

LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP, East Stroudsburg University; Matt Magnuson, MS, CCC-SLP, Mansfield Township Elementary School; Emily Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, Colonial IU 20 and East Stroudsburg University

Research is emerging supporting use of distributed practice schedules (i.e., three times per week for five minutes), often known as “speech speech,” vs. traditional massed practice schedules (i.e., one time per week for 30 minutes) for treating articulation. Studies have shown that students participating in “speed speech” programs are able to be dismissed from therapy after significantly less hours of treatment compared to those in traditional massed practice models (i.e., Bruce, Lynde, Weinhold, & Peter, 2018; Taps, 2008). Mire and Montgomery (2009) found that 98 percent of students with one to two speech sound errors remediated these errors in less than nine months. Kuhn (2006) found that when students were seen in five-minute increments multiple times per week, 15 percent of students were able to remediate and generalize skills in eight weeks and 54 percent in 16 weeks of treatment. Preliminary results from the authors’ data indicate that students participating in this program received 36 percent more speech therapy sessions, achieved their goals 15 percent faster, and spent 80 percent less time outside of the classroom. Although these data are promising, the use of “speed speech” programs is not yet widespread in schools. The goals of this presentation are to review supporting evidence for “speed speech” programs, including data collected by the authors, and to provide guidance for setting up “speech speech” programs in various settings. Guidance will include considerations for selecting candidates, determining frequency of services, and tips for advocating for this program to administrators and families.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe empirical evidence supporting the use of “speed speech” programs for treating speech sound disorders.
  • Discuss three benefits of using a “speed speech” model in a school setting.
  • Describe the factors that must be considered when implementing a “speed speech” model.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 13SLPs and ABI: Expanding Our Role on the Interdisciplinary Team

Allison Frederick, MS, CCC-SLP, ARC Seminars; Encompass Health of Vineland

Acquired brain injury (ABI) is becoming more prevalent across all rehabilitation settings. As speech-language pathologists (SLPs), we must be ready, willing and able to expand our role in the care of these people past our therapy sessions. This presentation will not only include ways to enhance your therapy sessions for persons with ABI, but also empower you as the SLP to take on a more active role on the interdisciplinary team and think outside the box when it comes to program development and person-centered care.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify acquired brain injury (ABI) and define each type.
  • Define person-centered care and appreciate how it relates to treatment of ABI.
  • Define how to expand your role as an SLP on the interdisciplinary treatment team for persons with ABI.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

11:15 AM-11:45 AM

Tech Session 4 Humor as an Intervention Target for English Language Learners

Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

For learners of English as a second language, the comprehension and use “American-style” humor is often slowly acquired. While the importance of humor may not appear to be indispensable, it is vital for assimilation into American culture. Humor reflects shared human understanding. It also serves as a “bridge” between individuals and aids in establishing human relationships. Humor is also frequently used on television and other mass media and it is important to understanding these forms of communication. The comprehension and use of humor that is relevant to a culture depends upon both background knowledge and complex language skills. In terms of background knowledge, humor often depends upon understanding of current events and issues, as well as commonly-known factual knowledge. Humor skills also depend upon both literal and figurative language skills. The ability to understand and produce humor depends on complex syntax and vocabulary. However, it also depends on the ability to understand and use both lexical and syntactic ambiguity. For example, the multiple meaning words are often used to create puns, and ambiguous sentences are often used in jokes. In terms of figurative language, humor often includes the use of metaphors, idioms and hyperbole.

This presentation will inform participants of the ways in which background knowledge and language skills underpin the acquisition of humor in learners of English as a second language. Additionally, suggestions for addressing each of these areas as well as humor more specifically will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Relate the importance of teaching American-style humor to English Language Learners.
  • Describe the various language skills underpinning comprehension of humor.
  • Describe methods for addressing humor comprehension and production.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

1:00 pm-2:00 pm

Session 14 Connecting With Autistic Clients for Meaningful Change

Katharine Bouser, MS, CCC-SLP, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Establishing a meaningful relationship with the client and family is the foundation for therapeutic progress. Relationship development is particularly important when working with autistic individuals, each of whom has a unique set of communication abilities, sensory differences, interests and support needs. This presentation will explore strategies to establish and maintain therapeutic connections with autistic individuals, with a particular focus on toddlers and preschoolers. The presenter will introduce techniques for co-regulation, which will in turn facilitate engagement, minimize challenging behavior and support a child in moments of distress. Strategies to incorporate special interests and meet sensory needs will be reviewed in detail. The presenter will also describe the use of visual supports and methods to structure the environment to promote engagement within a neurodiversity-affirming framework.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define co-regulation and explain its importance when supporting autistic individuals.
  • Describe strategies to integrate a child’s special interests within speech-language treatment.
  • List alerting and calming activities and describe methods for incorporating them to support regulation and engagement.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 15Revolutionize Your Practice: From Lanterns to Lightbulbs!

Joanne Wisely, MA, CCC-SLP, Sole Proprietor

Whether you are new to the profession or you have been practicing for years, this session offers an opportunity to make your life easier, your services more efficient and to give you a better understanding of policies and payment systems. From the traditional service models known as best practice to more current best practice service and payment models that integrate collaboration, communication and technology, this session offers information that could revolutionize your practice. What is being done to facilitate interprofessional service models? Do you know why the term Value Based Care is used? Is CSD documentation part of the patient’s electronic health record? Is the CSD clinical report automatically included in discharge records for your facility or organization? How can your clinical information transition to another service provider without faxes and phone calls? Join us as we discuss the use of lanterns in traditional practice, and we see CSD professionals leading the future with the newest lightbulbs in advanced practices. As advocate leaders leaving this session you will have new insight and a much brighter view of what could make CSD practice better valued, our services more efficient and our clinical documentation interoperable.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the background of and meaning for Value Based Care.
  • Describe concepts of and access resources related to Interprofessional Collaborative Practice.
  • Explain the impact of the International Classification of Function on SMART goals and measurable outcomes that are codable in clinical documentation.
  • Explain the statutory requirements for interoperability of patient/client information for transitions of care.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 16Trends in Telepractice: A State-Wide Survey

Caron Anthony-Higley, PhD, MEd, MA, CCC-SLP/L, Intermediate Unit 5; Reethee Antony, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University; Christine Delfino, MS, CCC-SLP, Allegheny Health Network; Nancy Carlino, MA, CCC-SLP, Pennsylvania Western University; Jenna Gregor, Pennsylvania Western University; Emma Schaedler, Misericordia University

Telepractice has been widely used since the onset of the pandemic. However, with reduced prevalence in COVID-19 rates, many organizations, institutions and associations are resuming in-person services. Questions around the need to pursue the online modality for adaptability and convenience persist. A survey was conducted to gather information from practicing clinicians on their use of telepractice to aid decision making on policies and to promote evidence-based practice. The objective of the survey was to conduct a statewide survey to understand the trends in practices in clinicians within the state of Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association (PSHA) Telepractice Committee conducted the survey with 10 questions: eight closed-ended and two open-ended questions. The closed-ended questions were designed to gather information on use of teletherapy prior to pandemic, post-pandemic, across settings, age group and diagnoses. The open-ended questions probed into challenges and benefits of teletherapy. Twenty-five respondents completed the survey. The responses were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Statistical analysis included t-tests. Content analysis was conducted on the qualitative data, and themes were identified. Interactions between variables will be discussed. The results from this survey illuminate the factors involved in telepractice and contribute to the existing literature on telepractice. Further, the results help in understanding the future trends in the area of telepractice and provide recommendations to clinicians who are interested in telehealth.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three benefits of telepractice.
  • Identify three challenges related to telepractice and how they can be addressed
  • Compare and contrast telepractice versus telehealth.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

1:00 pm-2:30 pm

Session 17 Clinical Focus on the "Other" Fluency Disorders: Cluttering, Atypical Disfluencies

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Monmouth University

This session will use a case-based approach to demonstrate differential diagnosis of cluttering and atypical disfluencies. New updates to treatment techniques for both cluttering and atypical disfluencies will be presented.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate cluttering from atypical disfluencies.
  • Describe two treatment strategies for cluttering.
  • Describe two treatment strategies for atypical disfluencies.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Session 18 Infant Mental Health and Speech-Language Pathology

Laura Richardson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Lebanon Valley College

Infant mental health (IMH) is an interdisciplinary field of research and practice that focuses on the social-emotional well-being and healthy relationship development of young children ages birth to five (PA-AIMH, n.d.). The purpose of this session is to explore the inextricable, bidirectional relationships among IMH, communication delays and disorders, and pediatric feeding problems and disorders. The IMH research team at Lebanon Valley College (LVC) has a robust line of research investigating these relationships through four scoping/systematic reviews with manuscripts in preparation (e.g., Barrick & Richardson, 2022; DiMaio & Richardson, 2022; Lowe & Richardson, 2022; Wolfe & Richardson, 2022) which synthesized an aggregated total of 61 peer-reviewed research articles. Three surveys and two treatment efficacy studies currently in progress will also be discussed. Themes including the characteristics of specific diagnoses and characteristics that influence IMH as well as supports and barriers, and treatment implications will be discussed through case study applications.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the bidirectional relationships among infant mental health, communication and feeding development.
  • Discuss the bidirectional relationships among infant mental health, communication delays and disorders, and feeding problems and disorders.
  • Identify supports and barriers social-emotional well-being and relational health in case studies.
  • Design infant mental health informed, evidence-based evaluation and treatment plans based on case studies.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 19Multi-Modality Rehabilitation in Head and Neck Cancer: Options and Evidence

Kelly Salmon, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Salus University

Persons treated for head and neck cancer (HNC) make up a heterogenous group of individuals presenting with myriad post-treatment conditions (e.g., dysphagia, trismus, lymphedema, mechanical restriction) that require the skill of a speech-language pathologist (SLP) to conduct a comprehensive assessment and to implement multiple modalities into therapy. Over the years, several quantitative measures have been developed specifically with the head and neck population in mind. These measures help to provide the SLP with the information necessary to develop and implement an individualized treatment plan. This session will focus on the currently available assessment and treatment options for the HNC population and will include demonstrations of several measurement tools and intervention modalities.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe currently available data-driven options for evaluation of function in individuals with HNC.
  • Identify evidence-informed and data-driven options for the treatment of individuals with HNC.
  • List at least three modalities that could be considered as part of a comprehensive dysphagia treatment plan for the HNC survivor.
  • Discuss the role of modalities in addressing dysfunction in individuals with HNC.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

2:15 pm-2:45 pm

Tech Session 5 Phonological Intervention for English Language Learners

Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Many Americans today report that English is not their first language. In fact, only about 80 percent of Americans speak English exclusively at home (Modern Language Association). This suggests that speech-language pathologists will continue to encounter an increasing number of English language learners in their clinical practice. Individuals who are in the process of acquiring English as a second language experience a variety of challenges. One of these is language transference, which is the influence of the structure of one of an individual’s languages on the other language. Transference varies according to the characteristics of the individual’s languages and are greatest across language that differ most greatly.

Phonology is the area of language with the greatest transference. This implies that the phonological characteristics of an individual’s first language are an important consideration when planning intervention for these clients. The phonologies of world languages vary tremendously. First, they differ in the number and types of phonemes. They also differ according to which speech sounds are classified as belonging to the same phoneme category. They differ according to their phonotactic constraints, the limitations on which sequences of phonemes are allowable in the language. Similarly, the allowable syllable structures vary across languages. While English allows a wide variety of syllable structures, other language use a much more limited repertoire of syllable structures. The author will describe the ways in which language vary in terms of phonology, and how clinicians can use this information to better serve their clients who are English language learners.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe ways in which the phonologies of world languages vary.
  • Describe error patterns associated with the influences of transference.
  • Describe methods for teaching English phonology.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Tech Session 6Polyp or Nodule? A Personal Journey With Vocal Fold Lesions

Victoria Boland, BS; Carly Bergey, MA, CCC-SLP; Rebecca Bawayan, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Moravian University

Vocal cord lesions are a term familiar to the field of speech-language pathology due to the impact these lesions have on the vocal folds and the voice itself. There are different types of lesions and each lesion can determine a different treatment option. Voice therapy is a specialized area of study within the field of speech-language pathology. A thorough understanding of vocal fold lesions is crucial for speech-language pathologists and graduate students working in this realm. Research demonstrates that 14% of practitioners in the field of speech-language pathology have personal experiences with vocal fold lesions due to high vocal demand. In addition to speech-language pathologists, actors and teachers are professions that also present at a high risk of vocal fold disorders. Additionally, COVID-19 has affected health care in numerous ways. Specifically regarding vocal difficulties, COVID-19 led to an increase in intubations and breathing complications which increased vocal fold difficulties. This session will discuss common vocal fold lesions and associated voice disorders, the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders, as well as the specific impact on teachers, actors and speech-language pathology students. The impact of the COVID- 19 pandemic on the rise of diagnosis will also be discussed. Additionally, the session will be focused on the personal experiences of a graduate student with a recent diagnosis of a vocal fold lesion which required surgery and voice therapy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the different types of vocal fold disorders and their origin.
  • Discuss the connection between the field of speech language pathology and impact of vocal cord disorders on their field.
  • Explain the diagnosis, treatment and implications of vocal cord disorders.
  • Explain the importance of client perspectives of vocal diagnoses.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

Tech Session 7Using a Visual Intervention to Improve Syntax in Deaf Children Who Sign

Kimberly Sanzo, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, Language First

The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a targeted syntax intervention on the ability of Deaf children with an incomplete first language to produce subject-verb-object (SVO) sentence structure in American Sign Language (ASL). This was a single-subject ABA design with follow-up. Both participants made significant gains in their ability to produce SVO structure in ASL. One participant reached the criterion of 9/10 in six sessions and the other participant in 10 sessions. Intervention demonstrated a therapeutic effect that was maintained in follow-up sessions. This intervention is a quick and effective way to help young Deaf children with an incomplete first language learn to produce basic word order in ASL.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the impact of an incomplete first language on syntax production and comprehension.
  • State the effect of a visual intervention on signing Deaf children’s syntax production.
  • State how the study’s findings might apply to their work.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

3:00 pm-4:30 pm

Session 20CAPD Treatment What Do I Need to Know

Maegan Mapes, AuD, CCC-A, Penn State University

In this session, we will discuss what is central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), how do you screen and when do you refer. We will review a test battery and report so the professionals understand how to interpret the information. We will then walk through the treatment options starting with accommodations and how to measure sound levels so the professionals know where the best seat is in the classroom. Second we will talk about the amplification options. Lastly we will talk about the therapy options that are available and demonstrate how they work and how they can be integrated into school therapy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify what to look for in a child with a central auditory processing disorder.
  • Describe reports of what the test results may look like for a student.
  • Discuss barriers and evaluation and treatment methods used.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 21Let’s TV-Talk: Delayed Echolalia (Gestalt Language) is Language Development

Nellie Flynn, MS, CCC-SLP, Wayfinders Therapy Center, LLC; Malena Paternoster, EBS Children’s Institute

This session focuses on delayed echolalia and it’s key role in language development for Gestalt Language Processors (GLP). Participants will gain an understanding of what a Gestalt Language Processor is as well as an in depth explanation of their Natural Language Acquisition (NLA) as outlined by Marge Blanc (2012), assessment of a GLP and ways to best support them. Presenters will use research, case examples and clinical experience to empower participants to feel more confident in identifying and supporting Gestalt Language Processors of any age, stage or neurotype.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate between Gestalt Language Development and Analytic Language Development.
  • Identify research supporting Gestalt Language Development.
  • Utilize the Natural Language Acquisition framework as outlined by Marge Blanc to guide their treatment plan when supporting GLPs.
  • Apply specific support from the seminar for GLPs with complex communication styles on their caseloads.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 22 - SupervisionOvercoming Obstacles to the Increased Use of Speech-Language Pathology Assistants

Amy Francek, MA, CCC-SLP, Bucks County Intermediate Unit; Marcy Pendleton, MS, CCC-SLP, New Story Schools-Central Region

Two critical issues are facing the field of speech-language pathology. First, there is a national need for speech-language pathologists (SLPs). The national employment rate of SLPs is expected to grow faster than average through the year 2031; there is an anticipated 21% increase in job openings (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2021). Second, respondents to the ASHA 2020 SLP Schools Survey indicated their greatest challenges were high volume of paperwork, high workload, high volume of meetings and challenges incorporating optimal service delivery models. Since 2017, ASHA has provided a roadmap for the use of speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) to address both SLP shortages and school-based SLP challenges. At that time, the ASHA Board of Directors voted to move forward with the creation of an Assistants Certification Program that allowed audiology assistants and SLPAs to become certified practitioners. Despite the opportunity that exists to employ SLPAs, they are used in a limited capacity in Pennsylvania schools. This session will review the updated ASHA SLPA Scope of Practice, as it relates to the current realities of today’s work environments. The session will also explore perceptions related to the hiring and utilization of SLPAs. Additionally, it will provide participants with strategies to address the anxiety, confusion and fear that may be associated with supervising SLPAs. The goal of the presentation is to increase SLPA utilization in Pennsylvania schools while supporting SLP preparedness for SLPA supervision.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the current employment situation for SLPs and SLPAs in Pennsylvania.
  • Identify the advantages of employing and supervising SLPAs.
  • Identify the challenges of employing and supervising SLPAs.
  • Describe best practices for SLPA supervision and collaboration.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 23Trauma-Informed Roadmap: Building Trust, Fostering Safety and Empowering Communication to Establish Independence

Laura Sibbald, MA, CCC-SLP, Chestnut Hill College

In this session, participants will engage in a targeted roadmap to build foundational knowledge of a trauma informed lens, followed by a targeted path to support self-awareness, empowerment and independence. The first stage of the journey focuses on a five-point check-in to build awareness of the signs and symptoms of trauma across children as well as therapeutic personnel. Acclimating to an environment and fostering our own self awareness skills are critical to moving forward into planning and action. The next stage of the journey focuses on the utilization of evidence-based strategies to create a step-by-step plan for resilience. Practical resources and tools will create an effortless environment of student learning and growth through targeting a foundation of safety, building trust and healthy communication and empowering resilience.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Establish foundational knowledge of trauma informed best practices, demonstrating the ability to recognize signs and symptoms in clients and therapeutic personnel.
  • Enumerate critical elements for building a safe, therapeutic and educational environment when working with clients.
  • Discuss and be able to implement a variety of strategies to support self-awareness, emotional advocacy, problem solving and resilience in clients,

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Friday, April 14

8:00 am-9:00 am

Session 24 - EthicsEvaluating NPO Status and Feeding Tube Weaning in Individuals With IDD

Lindsay Bly, MS, CCC-SLP, Melmark

This presentation will focus on the prevalence of feeding tubes with the intellectual/ developmental disabilities (IDD) population and the need for ongoing evaluation to determine appropriateness for PO diets to maximize quality of life. We will explore the rationale for feeding tube placement and NPO status, followed by the rationale for feeding tube removal and the ethical considerations within the IDD population. Discussion will review the interdisciplinary approach to determine the prerequisites for tube feeding weaning and analysis of case studies. We will highlight why speech-language pathologists are key team members for successful outcomes.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Determine key members of the interdisciplinary team for g-tube placement and removal within the IDD population.
  • Discuss how to create a plan to evaluate and fade g-tubes within the IDD population.
  • Discuss why aspiration does not always need to lead to tube feeding within the IDD population.
  • Discuss ethical concerns regarding decision making within the IDD population.

Time Ordered Agenda:
5 Minutes – Introduction
5 Minutes – General feeding tube information
5 Minutes – Intro to IDD population
10 Minutes – Who historically is the initial specialty to recommend feeding tubes?
10 Minutes – Follow-Up?
5 Minutes – SLP’s responsibility in NPO status
20 Minutes – Case Studies

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 25Rectify and Reform Clinical Cases: Building Skills for Systemic Change

Lisa Price, MS, CCC-SLP; Mercy Muguimi, MS, CCC-SLP, from Indiana University of PA

We need systemic change in our field to achieve improved outcomes for clients from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) populations. Although we have research to guide clinical practices with these populations, there remains a large gap between research and practice. We can teach graduate students the basic knowledge of evidence-based practices with CLD populations. However, knowledge may not be sufficient to ensure application within complex clinical environments (Selin et al., 2022). We must also equip students to become agents of change who can face the barriers to implementation in real-world settings. A first step is for clinicians to understand that middle actors in systems hold more power than often recognized (Parag & Janda, 2014). In our presentation, we will demonstrate the use of Rectify and Reform cases as a teaching tool to scaffold clinicians to consider where they can be an agent of change. Using several examples, we will illustrate how to review clinical cases, create a redo scenario using best evidence, map out a plan to rectify clinical missteps and identify action steps that can help reform the system. Although clinicians may have experience with the first three steps, review, redo and rectify, many have not been taught how to leverage their power as a middle-out actor. Using the iterative Rectify and Reform process, clinicians can take small steps that ultimately result in better systemic implementation of evidence-based clinical practices with CLD populations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain ways to effect change within a complex system.
  • Describe how to use Rectify and Reform cases as a teaching tool or self-reflection tool.
  • Apply the steps of reviewing, revising, rectifying and reforming.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 26Targeting Multiple Language Goals During Group Therapy for Young Children

Dana Bitetti, PhD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University

This presentation is designed as an introductory session for speech-language pathologists whose settings necessitate treating preschool and early school-age children in small and whole-class groups. First, current theoretical principles and implications of various service delivery models for the provision of speech-language interventions will be discussed. Service delivery models specify “where, when and with whom the intervention takes place” (Paul & Norbury, 2012) to meet specific communication goals. After a brief review of the research literature regarding service delivery models, the presenter will discuss practical, evidence-based strategies for structuring sessions and choosing activities to simultaneously target a variety of language goals. Strategies for maximizing dosage and increasing engagement will also be provided. Participants will learn techniques that can be implemented immediately using low to no-cost materials. Participants will also be provided with resources to provide evidence for their service-delivery decisions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe one method for structuring a 30–45 minute preschool group session to meet a variety of language goals.
  • Describe at least three strategies to keep all children engaged during a group session.
  • Describe how to incorporate engaging activities based on common classroom themes.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

8:00 am-9:30 am

Session 27Systematic Visual Analysis of Motor Speech Control

Amy Clark, MS, CCC-SLP, PROMPT Institute

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) spend considerable time working with children with speech sound disorders (SSD) on single sound errors. What sounds like a persistent single sound error may be due to disordered movements in lower-level articulators such as the jaw or lips. Currently, there are no other assessment tools available that offer SLPs the opportunity to systematically assess these movements in a variety of single words. This presentation will introduce the Motor Speech Hierarchy – Probe Word Assessment (MSH-PW), which is a criterion-based visual analysis that was developed to assess motor speech control and carefully examines lower-level articulators. It assists in justifying services, identifies priorities for treatment and evaluates if treatment is producing the desired result across any setting or treatment methodology. The research behind MSH-PW is described in the research article Development and Validation of a Probe Word List to Assess Speech Motor Skills in Children. This article recently received the Editor’s Award from the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and by each of the four editors-in-chief of Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups for meeting the highest quality standards in research design, presentation and impact. For award details see: https://academy.pubs.asha.org/2022/08/2022-asha-journals-awards/. This interactive session will briefly review research behind MSH-PW, apply scoring to clinical cases, and present actual therapy videos to highlight ways to incorporate assessment results into treatment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize Motor Speech Hierarchy – Probe Word Assessment (MSH-PW) research.
  • List and apply components of the MSH-PW to identify motor breakdowns in children with SSD.
  • List three ways to incorporate assessment results into treatment.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 28Talk! Move! Imagine! Smile! Mindful Strategies to Promote Resiliency in Children With Language Impairments

Shari Robertson, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, Dynamic Resources, LLC

While the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic has eased, the effects of the associated prolonged stress on the mental well-being of children continues to be of concern. Unfortunately, children with language impairments (LI) are at increased risk of detrimental mental health issues due to difficulties with executive function, lack of vocabulary to name and manage emotions, decreased problem solving and poor pragmatics skills. This seminar will demonstrate specific strategies/child-friendly activities, framed within the context of mindfulness, to promote resiliency across four developmental domains: communication (talk), cognitive/psychological (imagine), physical (move) and social/emotional (smile). Participants will learn to use storybook yoga, animal breathing, flights of imagination and laughter to help students respond to stress more productively and facilitate better clinical outcomes.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the characteristics of children with language impairment that predisposes them to decreased resiliency and its negative effects on mental health.
  • Discuss the intersection of mindfulness and communication, psychological, physical and emotional development.
  • Incorporate strategies to promote mindfulness and resiliency into therapy for children with (and without) language impairment.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

8:00 am-11:30 am

Session 29Aspiration Pneumonia Management in Complex Cases

George Barnes, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, FEESible Swallow Solutions LLC

Aspiration pneumonia is a complex condition requiring a complex, multi-faceted approach to manage effectively. This presentation will discuss the pathogenesis of aspiration pneumonia, risk factors as identified in the research, and methods to improve the identification of and management of those risk factors. A formal decision-making process will also be introduced to clarify problems and develop solutions to complex clinical situations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the pathogenesis of aspiration pneumonia and its risk factors.
  • Describe how the SLP can help manage risk factors including and beyond traditional dysphagia treatment.
  • Explain how to use a formal decision-making process to improve the accuracy of clinical decisions.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

9:15 am-9:45 am

Tech Session 8 - EthicsManaging Dysphagia and Communication in Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: Ethical Considerations

Sierra Quimby, MS, CCC-SLP from MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital

In the grand rounds format, presenters will discuss an older adult with metastatic cancer leading to superior vena cava syndrome, resulting in significant swallowing and communication needs. This case will frame issues related to limited literacy, limited health literacy, ethics, poor prognosis and team and family communication in dysphagia and communication treatment. The importance of flexible, patient-centered care will be highlighted throughout.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the nature and symptoms of superior vena cava syndrome, as they relate to the SLP scope of practice (including swallow and communication skills).
  • Discuss the ethical considerations involved with counseling and treating a patient with complex comorbidities and limited health literacy in an inpatient medical setting.
  • Discuss the impact of limited health literacy on swallowing and communication treatment for a patient with poor prognosis.

Time Ordered Agenda:

5 Minutes – Introductions and Disclosures
5 Minutes – Cancer and Superior Vena Cava Overview
5 Minutes – Case Intro and Inpatient Rehab Course
10 Minutes – Ethical Considerations
5 Minutes – Conclusions and Q & A

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Tech Session 9Use of Socially Assistive Robotics for Speech and Language Interventions

Rebecca Rehrey; Shannon Murphy; Cecilia Heidelberger; Hannah Bilenski; Michaela Raub; Kara Thourot; Olivia Olley; Adina Rosenthal, MS, CCC-SLP; Lori Cimino, MS, CCC-SLP; Melissa Alunni, MS, CCC-SLP; Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP; Chitrali Mamlekar, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University

Socially Assistive Robotics (SAR) is an expanding field of research that supports the emergence and development of language through social interaction with the use of interactive, customizable technology. Previous research emphasizes the use of SAR for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly to develop skills such as turn-taking, imitation and emotional recognition. This exploratory study aims to expand on this field of research by assessing the success of SAR for young children with speech and language disorders, in addition to children with ASD. This presentation will describe our exploratory pilot study in which graduate clinicians from the Misericordia University Speech-Language and Hearing Center utilized SAR to conduct therapy sessions. These sessions involved five children with various speech and language delays between the ages of three and 15 years old. Clinicians targeted intervention objectives such as joint attention and emotional regulation, and also used SAR to provide reinforcement or redirection. Reported outcomes from this study were categorized into the following constructs: familiarization with the SAR, engagement, motor and verbal imitation, verbal expression and reception. These findings support the use of SAR to enhance communication skills in children with speech and language disorders. In addition to assessing strengths that the SAR provides, this study evaluated potential barriers and limitations of using SAR within clinical settings. These results provide a strong foundation for clinicians to determine if SAR is an appropriate tool to integrate into their future clinical practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize previous research findings on socially assistive robotics
  • Assess strengths and limitations of using socially assistive robotics in speech-language pathology sessions
  • Discuss potential future clinical applications of socially assistive robotics in speech-language pathology

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

10:00 am-11:00 am

Session 30 - EthicsInformed Consumerism in Speech-Language Pathology

Jeanette Benigas, PhD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College

Courses, websites, certifications and therapy techniques requiring specialized training are on the rise and speech-language pathologists are unable to use social media platforms without the constant bombardment of these advertisements. This leaves many of us with the feeling of being not enough, no matter how many years of training or real-life clinical practice. This session will explore the use of ethical and unethical business practices designed to sell to SLPs. It will also discuss ways to become a more confident and informed consumer based on personal values. Clinicians will gain the ability to recognize what personal knowledge gaps need to be filled and how to vet the best way to gain that information. Following this session, attendees will be able to get clear on their values and be able to move forward as more informed and confident consumers.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how clinicians have been prepared and what knowledge gaps need to be filled.
  • Identify ethical and unethical business practices.
  • Describe quality of lifelong learning opportunities.
  • Identify how to choose quality courses and products to fill the knowledge gap.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 31Using a Systems Approach to Enhance Educational and Clinical Services

Rachel Wolf, PhD, CCC-SLP; Akila Rajappa, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, from East Stroudsburg University

This presentation will provide insight to how a systems-based approach was established and implemented during and post-pandemic to maintain educational and clinical services for graduate students studying to become speech-language pathologists and the clients they provide care. As a board accredited program in communication sciences and disorders, it is critical that specific standards are met to ensure all students gain comprehensive knowledge and skills across all domains within an SLP’s scope of practice. This includes educational coursework in addition to hands-on clinical experiences. Application of skills is when students develop their ability to work dynamically in an applied manner. Working directly with clients requires a systems approach whereby the SLP recognizes the relationship between culture, environment, language and disability (Horton, R., 2020). The unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic had a profound impact on approaches used to meet student learning outcomes, as well as provision of services to those clients receiving speech-language therapeutic services. Information will be provided on how educators in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders transitioned and adapted instruction during the pandemic. Information on how students continued to gain practical hours through telehealth will be described. The adaptations that were made during the pandemic had a lasting impact on current educational and clinical practices in health care fields, including speech-language pathology. These takeaways, including benefits and limitations, will be presented along with implications for future educational and clinical opportunities identified as a result of information learned abruptly during this unique ecological shift. The content provided will help inform those across domains including education and health care.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Conceptualize the role of a systems approach for working directly with students and clients.
  • Adapt educational and clinical practice to work dynamically during applied experiences.
  • Identify future opportunities to progress educational and clinical practices to best serve diverse populations.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

10:00 am-11:30 am

Session 32AAC Therapy 101: Easy Tips and Tricks to Grow Language

Amanda Samperi, MS, CCC-SLP, PRC-Saltillo

This implementation session focuses on what a family member, teacher or therapist can do to help an individual learn words; learn how to put words together; and increase sentence length using an augmentative/alternative communication (AAC) device. The following 10 tips are reviewed: learning the AAC system, modeling, which words to use, accepting all communication, happy accidents, slowing down and waiting, prompting, the right questions, SLP tricks and taking a person-centered approach. Direct instruction, practical exercises and video examples will be used to demonstrate these principles.

This is a beginner class for those who are new to implementing AAC systems and is intended for those who work with emerging and intermediate communicators who use AAC devices.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the difference between modeling and prompting.
  • Describe target words wisely.
  • Recast and expand on what someone says.
  • Comment and ask questions to promote communication.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 33Behavior 101: An SLP's Guide to Ethical, Interdisciplinary Behavior Management

Reed Senter, PhD, CCC-SLP, DeSales University; Maggie Collins, BA, DeSales University; Erin Stehle Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP, Longwood University

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) often report that effective behavior management is a vital skill in clinical practice, but that they have not received sufficient training in this domain (Chow & Wallace, 2021). These skills are important to develop because most SLPs experience challenging behaviors in their practice (Chow et al., 2022), and because challenging behaviors are common among children on the SLP’s caseload. Indeed, children with language disorders are twice as likely to develop challenging behaviors when compared to their language-typical peers (Hollo et al., 2014; Yew & O’Kearney, 2013). Historically, behavior therapists have served as allies and resources for SLPs, but the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) has recently come under fire from critics who express concerns about ABA’s principles and methods (e.g., Anderson, 2022). This controversy may leave SLPs with questions about behavior management: What is ethical? What is effective? Are there behavioral principles that I can implement with a good conscience? Despite any misgivings towards ABA, there are effective and positive behavior management strategies that SLPs can implement in their own services (e.g., Chow et al., 2021) and in collaborative partnerships (e.g., Wallace et al., 2022; Zimmerman et al., 2022). In this presentation, we will provide information about the underlying principles of behaviorism, discuss how these principles can inform an SLP’s service delivery without crossing a moral or ethical line and explore strategies for collaborating with other disciplines in children with co-occurring communication and behavior problems.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the underlying tenets of behaviorism, differentiating between supportive and harmful applications.
  • Implement appropriate behavior management techniques in their clinical practice.
  • Collaborate with other educators and service providers to implement a consistent behavior management system.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 34Beyond Burnout: From Charred to Re-Charged

Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, Dynamic Resources LLC

You’re a high achiever. A leader. A compassionate professional. But, you are no longer sure of your purpose and passion. Problems once solvable by simply working harder and longer seem insurmountable. It’s difficult to muster the energy to care – let alone take action to help yourself. Uniquely different than stress or depression, professional fatigue involves physical and emotional exhaustion, a reduced sense of accomplishment and a loss of personal identity – leaving you worn out, stressed out, checked out and out of ideas on how to move forward. Whether you are just beginning to smolder or feeling completely burned out, this session will provide tools to rebuild your physical, psychological and emotional mojo and rekindle your professional fire.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the risk factors, signs, stages and consequences of professional fatigue (burnout) in yourself and others.
  • Compare and contrast short term and long term stress.
  • Differentiate between productive/creative energy and destructive/detrimental energy.
  • Apply research supported strategies to facilitate physical, psychological and emotional recovery from professional fatigue.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

11:15 am-11:45 am

Tech Session 10Creating a Counseling Framework for Undergraduates in a CSD Program

Mary McDermott, EdD, CCC-SLP, Gannon University-Erie; Nicole Lewis, MS, CCC-SLP, Gannon University

As speech-language pathologists in higher education, we strive to provide a curriculum that prepares students for the care of the whole person within the scope of practice established by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Students commit to a journey that enhances and supports their academic, personal and professional growth. Along with the prerequisite coursework necessary for admission to a graduate speech-language pathology program, we created a framework through which we provide the theoretical and practical applications of counseling as a vital component of a student’s preparation and discernment. This session introduces the lens with which we addressed instruction in counseling from a therapeutic and holistic perspective anticipating students’ future needs as speech-language pathologists. This qualitative study of the student experience will serve to guide our pedagogy and experiential learning. The integration of counseling from a didactic perspective in one semester encompasses the theories, psychology, therapeutic relationship and model for service delivery while incorporating self-reflection. We created a framework to improve their understanding of strengths, biases and cultural considerations as they intersect with the therapeutic relationship. Opportunities for students to gain experience and apply counseling skills are provided in a second semester within a clinical methods model that integrates continued self-reflection and discernment. Student interviews and feedback contribute to the ongoing assessment of undergraduate curricula and highlight the methods that strengthen their skills in critical analysis, building trust and care for the whole person.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Synthesize didactic and clinical methods for teaching counseling within the SLP scope of practice.
  • Describe the assessment of a pedagogical framework in counseling.
  • Explain the sequence of curriculum for the development of student skills for counseling.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

1:00 pm-2:00 pm

Session 35Preparing for Post-Secondary Transition: Supporting Student Empowerment as an SLP

Laura Sibbald, MA, CCC-SLP, Chestnut Hill College

Transition to adulthood, including attending college or starting employment, is a time of significant change for many individuals. For neurodivergent individuals, excitement and anticipation of this change is frequently coupled with a sense of nervousness about how to manage these next important steps. As members of the student’s educational team, it is critical that SLPs consider post-secondary transition needs. In this session, the differences in required accommodations and supports within educational and employment settings is reviewed (IDEA vs ADAAA). Participants will review data surrounding current status of student preparedness for higher education, areas of growth for neurodivergent students specifically, and typical supports available for students. This information is used to consider therapeutic outcomes and to support targeted planning and goal setting. A variety of evidence-based methods for promoting dynamic learning, self-awareness, self-regulation and self-advocacy strategies to build a student’s personal autonomy is discussed. Attendees will be provided with strategies ready for immediate use.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate key tenets of IDEA and ADAAA/Section 504.
  • Identify a variety of therapeutic targets that improve student independence and increase preparedness for post-secondary transition.
  • Discuss opportunities for dynamic learning and student empowerment within the therapeutic and academic setting.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

1:00 pm-2:30 pm

Session 36Counseling, Strategy Training and Computer-Based Treatments in Patient-Centered Aphasia Rehabilitation

William Evans, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

Aphasia is an acquired language disorder which has a significant negative impact on communication and quality of life. While people with aphasia (PWA) respond well to behavioral interventions long into the chronic phase of recovery (Allen et al., 2012), access to treatment is generally limited and short-term (Cavanaugh et al., 2021). Helping PWA recover function and live successfully with aphasia requires addressing impairment-level, participation, environmental and psychosocial factors in an integrated and holistic fashion (Kagan et al, 2008). Therefore, there is a need to develop increasingly effective evidence-based treatments and integrated practice models that fit within current healthcare delivery constraints.

In this talk, I will review three lines of complementary research from my lab intended to support this endeavor. In the first, we are currently developing an integrated counseling and communication strategy training intervention based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, intended to address the unmet counseling needs of PWA and improve communication participation. In the second, we are developing more efficient adaptive computer-based restorative aphasia treatments based on open-source flashcard software. In the third, we are working with members of the aphasia community and professional game designers to develop therapeutic group-based aphasia games intended to fight social isolation and support language recovery. Together, this work supports a holistic long-term vision for aphasia rehabilitation where limited clinic time is focused on counseling, strategy training and training/prescribing computer-based restorative treatments for independent practice, while therapeutic games are used to foster community-based peer support and continued language recovery long after outpatient discharge.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe current attempt to address the unmet counseling needs of people with aphasia by adapting Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for this population.
  • Describe the rationale and current evidence for adaptive computer-based word-finding treatments in aphasia.
  • Describe the rationale and lessons learned in co-designing therapeutic aphasia games with stakeholder input.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 37Experiential Learning Opportunities to Develop Cultural Humility in Graduate Education

Kristen West, MA, CCC-SLP, PennWest-Edinboro; Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, PennWest-Edinboro; Robert Serianni, MA, CCC-SLP, Salus University; Veronica Baez, BS, Salus University; Claudia Cramer, BA, Salus University; Alyssa Peter, BA, Salus University; Lindsay Rock, BS, Salus University; Katie Bartles, PennWest-Edinboro; Grace Wright, BA, PennWest-Edinboro; Jordan Brewer, PennWest-Edinboro; Abigail Leposa, PennWest-Edinboro; Mary Phifer, MA, PennWest-Edinboro; Tayne Christianson, , PennWest Edinboro

Due to the increasing demands of providing students with salient graduate education with a focus on diversity, equity and inclusion principles graduate programs must find creative and authentic ways to infuse cultural humility and training into clinical and didactic coursework. In addition, students must develop a global worldview and engage in meaningful community interactions with individuals from diverse backgrounds. This presentation will discuss two universities and their experiences providing study abroad opportunities to students in conjunction with an external study abroad company, Therapy Abroad. A student and faculty panel will discuss the benefits of graduate student study abroad experiences. The presentation will highlight how these experiences enhance students’ ability to practice with cultural humility, with limited resources, while growing therapeutic flexibility and clinical skills. Positive impacts on both students, faculty and the international community will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the benefits and challenges of participating in study abroad programs.
  • Apply principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion in international clinical practice.
  • Discover flexible and culturally responsive approaches to various therapeutic models

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 38Meaning Making in Play: An Interdisciplinary Lens for Development, Part 1

Erin Forward, MSP, CCC-SLP, CLC, Advanced Institute for Development and Learning; Karen McWaters, MOT/OTR/L, Advanced Therapy Solutions

Dynamic systems theory of development teaches that many factors influence developmental trajectory and acquisition of skills. Many correlations between language development and physical development can be drawn based on this multifactorial understanding. However, traditionally individual disciplines have unintentionally created “silos” of information, meaning that few connections are taught between language and motor milestones, creating a disassociated understanding of progression and acquisition of skills. By learning from our partners in occupational therapy, we can reunite the language-based and body-based knowledge and redefine the embodied developmental experience of the whole child.

In part one of this course we aim to outline a holistic, evidence-based perspective of development, to form bridges between bodies of knowledge in language, cognitive physical and motor domains, and to provide a lens for understanding terms and language used between disciplines. Because play is the primary vehicle for learning in childhood, this therapeutic tool will be explored as it fuels growth and provides a transdisciplinary knowledge base. By identifying capacities and themes that pervade milestones in language, play and motor skills, an integrated picture of development will be outlined to increase interdisciplinary collaboration and effectiveness of interventions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify characteristics and types of play.
  • Describe developmental capacities across physical, emotional and cognitive domains and how they relate to developmental milestones.
  • Define praxis and articulate the connection between the stages of praxis and language development.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Session 39Innovative Methods for Assessment and Treatment of Selective Mutism

Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, La Salle University; Cesar Ruiz, SLPD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University; Louis Chesney, BS, Rethink Autism, LLC

Children with selective mutism (SM) present with a consistent failure to speak in specific social situations where there is an expectation for speaking, despite speaking in others. If left untreated, SM has been known to negatively impact social communication, mental health and quality of life (Pereira, et al., 2021). This presentation provides details about assessment and treatment for speech-language pathologists working with children who have SM. The presentation includes an overview of the diagnostic criteria of SM, an innovative and validated method used to evaluate children with SM, and a new treatment approach bridging the gap from vocalization to conversational speech. The ECHO Program, also supporting teletherapy, will be reviewed with demonstrations of the three modules that comprise the program: vocal control, social communication and role-play simulations for SM.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the association of selective mutism and speech, language and voice impairments.
  • Explain a validated evaluation method and steps to assess selective mutism.
  • Describe treatment techniques to facilitate vocalization and verbalization for communication in children with selective mutism.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

1:00 pm-1:30 pm

Tech Session 11An Immersive Virtual Field Trip: A Reality for Teaching Vocabulary

Yvonne D’Uva Howard, PhD, CCC-SLP; Amy Lustig, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Salus University

The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an immersive virtual filed trip (iVFT) as a potential modality to increase word learning among grade school students with (DLD) and low initial topic-specific vocabulary. Thirty participants ranging from 6;00 to 8;12 years olds were randomized into a traditional book or iVFT condition. Both groups completed baseline and post-intervention testing on four vocabulary measures to assess receptive and expressive word knowledge relative to the topic of space. Participants received 15 minutes of the respective learning condition for three consecutive days. In addition, participants completed a 15 -question Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) on a five-point smile face Likert scale with three additional open-ended questions that were analyzed using thematic analysis. Both the book and iVFT conditions were effective for improving space-themed vocabulary knowledge; however, participants in the iVFT condition made greater gains than participants in the book condition. Also, all study participants rated motivation as high but participants in the iVFT ranked constructs of motivation more favorably than those in the book group. A rich instructional approach (e.g., direct, indirect, interactive, contextual, repetitive, and multisensory experiences) for teaching vocabulary to children with DLD provides a conceptual framework for the measured gains and level of motivation. These results demonstrate the scholastic and motivational value of virtual reality technology for teaching academic vocabulary to grade school children with DLD.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the impact of developmental language disorder on vocabulary.
  • Compare the characteristics of a static book to an iVFT for learning academic vocabulary.
  • Propose a lesson plan using an iVFT can extend your current practice.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

1:45 pm-2:45 pm

Session 40Why Can’t We Do That? Policies That Impact Your Practice

Erin Buckwalter, MS, CCC-SLP, Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health

The Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association (PSHA) Government Relations Committee often receives questions from PSHA members for input and advice on matters that pertain to policies and regulations. Often, it has been identified that our members don’t fully understand what policies relate to the organization versus state (practice acts) versus federal laws. This seminar will include information on various levels of policies and when to consult whom. It will cover information on the educational component, including the difference between legislation, regulation and policy. Further, the seminar will provide information on levels of regulation and its definition. The seminar will also include some real-life examples to understand the route to address an issue and to understand who is regulating the practice. Finally, resources related to Government Relations and information on the PSHA Advocacy website will be shared with our PSHA members.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast legislation versus regulation versus policy.
  • Identify one topic or issue in each of the categories: Organizational, state and federal arenas.
  • Assess and review advocacy-related problem-solving strategies and route.
  • Explain how to access and use various resources for professional advocacy.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

2:15 pm-2:45 pm

Tech Session 12Current Motor Learning Principles Applied to Speech-Language Pathology

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP; Jacob Thomas; Stephanie Maines; Alexandra Long, from Misericordia University

Traditional theories in motor learning propose that conscious awareness over volitional movements negatively affects an individual’s performance. Motor learning is a “set of processes associated with practice or experience leading to relatively permanent changes in the capability for movement” (Schmidt & Lee, 2005). Current motor learning theory, however, suggests that conscious attention to motor movements can improve execution and overall performance. An integrated implicit-explicit approach to speech therapy applies principles from current motor learning literature to accommodate multiple learning modalities and improve acquisition, execution, and generalization of the new motor skill. According to current research, training should include: integration of implicit and explicit instruction, symbolic representation of the motor act, combination of action observation and motor imagery, ability to transfer between Type 1 to Type 2 processing. The motor learning approach also involves gestures, generalizations, implicit-explicit instruction, implicit instruction, and deliberate, focused practice, which involve the aspects listed above. Speech therapy focusing on training and learning is effective in the treatment of traditionally difficult-to-treat voice, articulation, dysphagia, and other motor-based communication disorders. The purpose of this presentation is to detail an objective-driven, integrated implicit-explicit approach to speech therapy based on current motor learning theory.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain training procedures that are based on new concepts related to motor learning.
  • Demonstrate the effectiveness of an integrated implicit-explicit approach to speech therapy.
  • Discuss the primary objectives in effective motor learning applied to speech therapy.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

3:00 pm-4:30 pm

Session 41Enhancing Language and Building Rapport Through Video Games in Therapy

Erik Raj, PhD, CCC-SLP, Monmouth University

Playing video games appears to be a mainstream habit of many individuals, and some researchers have described video game playing as a “major global pastime” (Carras et al., 2018, p. 5) in large part because of the estimated 3.24 billion video game players, worldwide (Statista, 2021). With video games appearing to be such a ubiquitous part of the lives of many children, numerous researchers interested in education and healthcare have started to investigate the possibilities of potential learning and/or clinical gains that might be made as a direct result of infusing video game playing and discussions into the classroom or therapy setting (Baranowski et al., 2016; Baranowski et al., 2008; Carras et al., 2018; Granic et al., 2014). A myriad of video game experiences and approaches have been explored during the education and treatment of clients, of numerous ages, with various communication disorders. Some examples include therapeutically driven video game play with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (Ferguson et al., 2013; Malinverni et al., 2017), voice disorder (King et al., 2012), velopharyngeal dysfunction (Cler et al., 2017), and aphasia (Garcia, 2019). However, limited research has been explored that specifically looks at how school-based speech-language pathologists can use video games in speech-language therapy with the students on their caseloads. Therefore, the purpose of this session is to actively discuss and demonstrate numerous video games to showcase how that digital experience could benefit some school-aged students as they continue to grow and evolve their speech and language abilities.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify online video games that are appropriate to use in speech-language therapy with school-aged children and adolescents.
  • Summarize approaches to using online video games in speech-language therapy to help school-aged children and adolescents improve their overall expressive and receptive language abilities.
  • Demonstrate different ways to appropriately use online video games in speech-language therapy to build rapport between the speech-language pathologist and the school-aged children and adolescents.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 42Exploring AAC and AT With TechOWL

Hali Strickler, MA, CCC-SLP, TechOWL, Institute on Disabilities at Temple University

Navigating the system for AAC and assistive technology can sometimes seem like a daunting task. Where do we start? What options are available? How do we get the equipment paid for? TechOWL, Pennsylvania’s designated Assistive Technology Act Program, is here to guide you through the process! During this session, attendees will learn about TechOWL’s many initiatives and resources. Attendees will imagine, discover and explore AAC options available to support children and adults with complex communication needs. Attendees will also learn how to decide on possible AAC solutions and then how to get that system/device funded in Pennsylvania. This session will primarily focus on how TechOWL can support speech-language pathologists, educators and teams working with pediatric clients and their families.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify TechOWL resources through the website, phone or social media.
  • List at least three different AAC systems/devices available from the Assistive Technology Lending Library.
  • Explain at least two potential funding sources for AAC in Pennsylvania.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 43Functional Outcomes and Dysphagia in the Critically and Chronically Critically Ill

Randy Dubin, MA, CCC-SLP, Good Shepherd Penn Partners/Penn Medicine

With advances in care over the years, patients are better able to survive an intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Many ICU survivors develop post–intensive care syndrome (PICS), defined as new or worsening impairment after critical illness in one or more of the following domains: cognition, mental health, or physical health. Those recovering from chronic critical illness (CCI) are a vulnerable subset of ICU survivors. Little is known of the goals and functional outcomes achieved by patients after rehabilitation in the LTACH setting. This presentation will examine patient goals and functional outcomes, including swallowing function, among ICU survivors and patients with chronic critical illness admitted to an LTACH with a tracheostomy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define critical illness vs. chronic critical illness and identify clinical features of each.
  • Discuss the role of the SLP in treating patients with critical and chronic critical illness.
  • Identify etiologies of dysphagia and recovery of swallowing function in the critically and chronic critically ill.
  • Identify goals and functional outcomes achieved by patients after rehabilitation in the LTACH setting.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 44Meaning Making in Play: Interdisciplinary Evaluation and Application, Part 2

Erin Forward, MSP, CCC-SLP, CLC, Advanced Institute for Development and Learning; Karen McWaters, MOT/OTR/L, Advanced Therapy Solutions

Dynamic systems theory of development teaches that many factors influence developmental trajectory and acquisition of skills. Many correlations between language development and physical development can be drawn based on this multifactorial understanding. However, traditionally individual disciplines have unintentionally created “silos” of information, meaning that few connections are taught between language and motor milestones, creating a disassociated understanding of progression and acquisition of skills. By learning from our partners in occupational therapy, we can reunite the language-based and body-based knowledge and redefine the embodied developmental experience of the whole child.

Part two of this course will discuss various disruptions in development including diagnoses, trauma and sensory processing and how we can better support our patients. A deeper dive into sensory processing including sensory profiles and application of this knowledge through various strategies will be presented. As speech-language pathologists how can we then use this information for more successful intervention involving improved regulation and utilization of cueing and support of a that consistent feedback loop? Case studies will help to pull together this information in a functional and interdisciplinary way. Allowing us to shift our frame of reference when assessing our patients to a more holistic lens will improve patient outcomes and collaboration with other disciplines for optimal success.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of developmental disruptions on language and motor skills.
  • Identify individual differences in sensory processing.
  • Apply sensory-sensitive concepts for treatment in providing feedback to clients and structuring sessions.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 45Pathways to Employment in Higher Education: Exploring Education and Experience

Jeanette Benigas, PhD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College; Dana Bitetti, PhD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University; Nancy Carlino, MA, CCC-SLP, Pennsylvania Western University; Jill Grogg, MS, CCC-SLP, Salus University; Kelly Salmon, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Salus University; Christine Shumaker, MS, CCC-SLP, Pennsylvania Western University; Laura K. Sibbald, MA, CCC-SLP, Chestnut Hill College; Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, Pennsylvania Western University; Kristen West, MA, CCC-SLP, Pennsylvania Western University

Are you interested in training the next generation of clinicians? Pursuing research? Excelling at teaching? Improving clinical care? According to ASHA EdFind there are more than 20 universities with CSD programs in Pennsylvania and according to CAA there are 34 programs in candidacy across the U.S. Currently there is a high demand for faculty with terminal degrees (PhDs and in related fields) and other highly qualified individuals possessing masters degrees. This moderated, interactive panel session will discuss the various pathways to working in higher education as a speech-language pathologist. The panelists represent a range of potential employment opportunities at the university level including academic faculty, doctoral students, clinical instructors and administrators. The purpose of different doctoral degrees (e.g., PhD, SLPD, EdD) and different funding sources will be discussed. Guidance will be provided for selecting a doctoral path that aligns with your personal and professional goals. We will highlight the experiences of practicing clinicians who decided to pursue doctoral work, those who transitioned to higher education as clinical faculty, and those who became clinical researchers. Additionally, the roles and responsibilities of academic and clinical faculty will be discussed including developing engaging teaching practices, conducting and disseminating research, university service and supervising graduate students. Opportunities within higher education for professionals with a masters degree will also be highlighted as well as the benefits and challenges of working in higher education. Participants will have opportunities to ask questions and will be provided with additional resources for more information.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose(s) of obtaining different types of doctoral degrees and important considerations when choosing a program.
  • Identify opportunities and challenges in pursuing a doctoral degree (or work in higher education).
  • Describe various employment opportunities available to clinicians within higher education.
  • Identify resources to take the next steps for personal and professional growth.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Saturday, April 15

8:00 am-9:00 am

Session 46Communication and Vision Across the School Day: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Margaret Lamb, MS, CCC-SLP, HMS School for Children With Cerebral Palsy

An area of need for clinicians and educators is how to address the communication needs of students while embedding appropriate visual adaptations into their augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. This interactive session will discuss individualized considerations that are necessary to implement student-centered AAC design for students with complex communication needs and visual impairment (VI) who currently utilize or trial high/low technology AAC interventions. Presenters and participants will examine case studies to observe and analyze AAC assessment and treatment strategies. The presenters will open the topic for participants to discuss their own clinical experiences with various populations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss unique considerations for AAC design for students with CCN and a VI.
  • Identify the need for an interdisciplinary model to optimize student outcomes and consistency across school settings.
  • Apply visual components and communication strategies to case studies presented.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 47Strategies for Planning and Facilitating a Successful Aphasia Support Group

Alison Finkelstein, MA, CCC-SLP, Salus University

Extending services for persons with aphasia outside of traditional individualized treatment is critical to their life participation. Aphasia support groups help bridge the gap by providing opportunities to meet holistic goals beyond language competence. Aphasia groups provide a social therapeutic environment supported by the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA Project Group 2008) whose philosophy focuses treatment on living with aphasia rather than on recovering from aphasia. With these themes in mind, The Speech Language Institute (SLI) at Salus University in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, established a monthly Aphasia Support Group (ASG) in July 2017. As an affiliate of the National Aphasia Association, the group welcomes persons with aphasia and their care partners. The group has been successful in that it provides an environment for psychosocial support and aphasia education, promotes everyday problem solving, teaches strategies for negotiating social situations, increases self-advocacy and fosters recognition of communication competence. The focus of SLI’s ASG is on the word support through group interaction. It does not specifically target speech-language goals but rather offers members a supportive environment for communicating, learning and participating in a socially comfortable setting. The format of topic theme and discussion is facilitated through use of supportive conversational cues, questioning and reinforcement of participation. Members are encouraged to expand on topics, share personal experiences, and discuss how to negotiate daily challenges. In this seminar, a theoretical framework and strategies will be presented to guide effective development, planning and facilitation of a successful aphasia support group.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define core values that underlie aphasia group services.
  • Identify the psychosocial benefits of aphasia support groups.
  • Apply specific planning and facilitation techniques in order to develop a successful aphasia support group.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 48Supporting Students With ASD in College: The Labyrinth Center

Tamara Leeper, SLPD, CCC-SLP, MS, Indiana University of PA; Tara Pangonis, MEd, Indiana University of PA and Indiana Area School District

It has long been known that many students with ASD have average to above average intelligence and excel at academics. These students are now pursuing college degrees at increasing numbers. Universities across the country have recognized the need to provide additional supports to the ASD population to support their unique needs. This session will review the trends in college enrollment for the ASD population, the additional needs of this population, a brief review of several support programs across the country, as well as specific details about the comprehensive supports provided by the Labyrinth Center at Indiana University of PA.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current trend of college enrollment for students on the autism spectrum.
  • Identify areas of need for college students with ASD.
  • Explain supports available at the college level for students with ASD.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 49What's New With PRC-Saltillo: Using New Features Across Environments

Amanda Samperi, MS, CCC-SLP; Darlette Navrotski, from PRC-Saltillo

The field of AAC is constantly changing, as technology is ever evolving. PRC-Saltillo frequently releases updates to products and services that enhance the daily lives of users of AAC and provide support across environments. This session will provide an overview to the latest updates to PRC-Saltillo products and services, while providing ways to implement these products and services in everyday life!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify at least three new features of PRC-Saltillo products.
  • Identify at least three new features of PRC-Saltillo services.
  • Identify at least three ways to use new PRC-Saltillo products and services across environments with users of AAC.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

8:00 am-9:30 am

Session 50 - DEILanguage and Literacy Together: Intervention for Dual Language Learners With DLD

Lisa Bedore, PhD, CCC-SLP, Temple Univeristy

For bilingual children with developmental language disorders intervention provides a special challenge for clinicians. An overarching goal of Intervention should be to help children becomes more efficient language learners independent of the language(s) of intervention. But clinicians need to provide this intervention taking into account that bilingual language knowledge is distributed across the two languages. To achieve this goal, clinicians need to plan to ensure that learning can make the linguistic connections to leverage gains across the whole language system. In this session we will review characteristics of language learning difficulties in bilingual Spanish-English learners with developmental language disorder. Building on this foundation we will discuss a book-based bilingual approach to language intervention for children that focusses both on cross language and cross domain connections. By fostering these connections we are poised to develop efficient approaches to invention for bilingual learners independent of the language of intervention. Participants will have opportunities to interact with materials and workshop selection of books, goals and activities.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify characteristics of developmental language disorder in bilingual children.
  • Explain how semantic and grammatical knowledge complement one another.
  • Identify ways to increase language complexity in bilingual children.
  • Explain how knowledge of one language can support knowledge of the other in dual language learning.

Time Ordered Agenda:
8:00 am-8:15 am – Characteristics of developmental language disorders in bilingual children
8:15 am-8:30 am – Efficiency of language learning vs language specific knowledge as language intervention outcome
8:30 am-8:45 am – Selecting the language of intervention: single language versus dual language intervention approaches to goal selection
8:45 am-9:00 am – Connecting semantic and grammatical knowledge within language
9:00 am-9:15 am – Fostering cross language connections to support efficient language learning
9:15 am-9:30 am – Case study illustrating selections of goals, activities, and materials  

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

9:45 am-10:45 am

Session 51Update on Licensure 2023

Patrick Murphy, AuD, Chair; Sarah E. Delano, MEd; Lisa S. Butler, MA; Amy Goldman, MS, CCC-SLP; Dana Wucinski, Esq., Board Counsel; Shakeena Chappelle, Board Administrator, from the Pennsylvania Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Representatives of the PA Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (a.k.a. the Licensure Board) will provide an update on any PA laws or regulations affecting the professions. An overview of “lessons learned” from the recent CE audit will be presented. In addition, standards of practice, including ethics specified in Chapter 45 regulations will be reviewed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List two common mistakes made when reporting continuing education and penalties.
  • List two examples of actions that constitute violations of the PA Code of Ethics.
  • Describe a way a spouse of active military with an out-of-state license may receive a PA license.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

9:45 am-11:15 am

Session 52Assessing and Treating Children Who Stutter: A Community-Based Approach

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Pennsylvania Western University

This session will discuss evaluation and treatment strategies for children who stutter, from preschool through high-school. Emphasis will be placed on working with children and their families through a community-based approach that focuses on comprehensive assessment and treatment. Participants will learn and discuss practical assessment and treatment strategies that they can implement into their clinical practice. Participants will also learn about counseling strategies that can be used by speech-language pathologists to target the affective and cognitive aspects of stuttering that are within our scope of practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify key aspects of community-centered stuttering assessment and treatment.
  • Discuss treatment strategies that target the behavioral, affective, and cognitive, components of stuttering.
  • Identify counseling strategies to target negative self-reactions to stuttering.
  • Identify strategies to improve overall communication for children who stutter.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 53Building Communication Skills in Mixed Groups: Easy Ideas for Monday

Emily Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, Colonial IU 20 and East Stroudsburg University

In school settings, many therapists find themselves seeing students in “mixed groups” (including students with various goals and needs, and sometimes varying ages or developmental levels). Mixed groups can be intimidating to plan for and lead, even for experienced clinicians; yet, due to full caseloads and scheduling logistics, mixed groups are often impossible to avoid. There is a need for meaningful, easy-to-implement activities and instructional strategies that target a variety of functional speech and language skills and can benefit students with a wide variety of needs, including speech sound production, narrative skills, semantic skills, pragmatic skills and social-emotional skills.

The current presentation will review practical ideas for integrating instruction for each of these areas into mixed groups for the benefit of all students. Drawing on years of experience in the fields of psychology, education and speech-language pathology, the presenter will describe effective, evidence-based ways to build communication skills that can be integrated into existing schedules, settings, and therapy formats. The goal is for attendees to leave with new ideas that they can bring back to their clients and use in their next sessions. After reviewing new ideas, strategies and techniques, attendees will practice applying skills learned about working with mixed groups by brainstorming activities to use for case studies. If time permits, attendees will also have the opportunity to share ideas that they are currently using. This session will be appropriate for new clinicians seeking guidance as well as experienced clinicians seeking to expand their current toolbox.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three ways to integrate language skills into mixed group therapy sessions.
  • Describe three activities that promote social-emotional learning and health that can be integrated into speech therapy sessions.
  • Describe ways to modify activities for elementary vs. secondary populations.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 54Hanen More Than Words®: Adding Flexibility to a Parent Coaching Intervention

Kelly Dame, MSc, CASLPO, CCC-SLP, The Hanen Centre

This presentation describes a newly-developed individual online intervention based on the Hanen More Than Words® group program. While maintaining the manualized, adult education-focused approach to coaching, this parent-child intervention offers additional flexibility in terms of content and length, utilizing modified materials. Pilot program evaluation to date has been positive.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the four-part coaching model used in the More Than Words® Program.
  • List four proven coaching principles that should be utilized when working with parents.
  • Contrast the More Than Words® Program for groups of parents with the modified More Than Words-based intervention for individual parents of autistic children.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

9:45 am-10:15 am

Tech Session 13A Critical Look at the Feasibility of Table-Top RPGs for Group Therapy for TBI

Claudia Krautkremer; Louise Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Moravian University

This is a pilot study examining the possibility of using a table-top Role Playing Game (RPG) for treating cognitive-communication deficits secondary to a traumatic brain injury. This presentation will illustrate the reasons for wanting to use table-top RPGs in therapy, as well as examine the feasibility, practicability and benefits of doing such. Attendees will be walked through the data, tools and process of adapting RPGs to group therapy, as well as expand clinical knowledge of treating cognitive-communication deficits.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the cognitive challenged associated with playing a table-top role playing game (RPG).
  • Examine the use of an RPG in a virtual group setting for clients with TBI.
  • Analyze the use of RPGs with other researched interventions for cognitive-communication deficits secondary to a TBI.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Tech Session 14The Round and Angular Shape of Words: The Influence of Iconicity and Autistic Traits on Novel Word Learning

Vijayachandra Ramachandra, PhD; Kelly Ziskind, from Marywood University

Studies on healthy adults that have used the ‘bouba-kiki’ paradigm have demonstrated an advantage for iconicity, which refers to a direct connection between words and their referents. That is, bouba-like words (produced with rounded lips) are matched with round and kiki-like words (produced with retracted lips) are matched with jagged figures. However, none of these studies have used an explicit encoding word learning paradigm. The first aim of the study was to explore the advantages of iconicity in healthy adults on a novel word learning task. Although children with autism spectrum disorders show a reduced bouba-kiki effect, the influence of autistic traits on learning iconic words in the general population is not known. The second aim of the study was to investigate the influence of autistic traits on learning novel (iconic) words in healthy adults. Participants between 18 and 40 years (N= 462) were given an explicit expository paradigm where a total of 12 novel images were presented during the learning phase (half of the images had iconic names and the other half had arbitrary names) and tested for comprehensions using a three-alternative forced-choice procedure. They were also required to complete an autism quotient questionnaire. Results showed no benefits of iconicity on word learning as reflected by lack of a significant difference between iconic and arbitrary conditions. Interestingly, participants with very high autistic traits performed significantly better than the ones with very low autistic traits. The clinical implications of using iconic words for language intervention will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the benefits of iconicity on word learning
  • Discuss the findings of the ‘bouba-kiki’ effect in individuals with autism spectrum disorders
  • Describe the benefits of using iconic words in the treatment of individuals with autism and other language disorders

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Tech Session 15Supporting Intentional Communication Across the Lifespan: A Systematic Review

Erica Rohrer, BA; Laura Richardson, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Lebanon Valley College

The purpose of this technical session is to describe a systematic review of the literature for individuals with disabilities who are preintentional and relate those findings to a tri-focus framework (Siegel-Causey & Bashinsky, 1997). The authors conducted a systematic review of 46 articles to identify evidence-based communication treatments for individuals with developmental disabilities across the lifespan. These studies were analyzed based on participants, intervention procedures, intervention results and certainty of evidence. Evidence-based interventions for learners included unaided and aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and interventions to support attention and social contingency awareness. Evidence-based interventions for communication partners included strategies for increasing opportunities for communication and enhancing sensitivity and responsivity to potential communication acts. Instruction is also provided in specific technological and communication aids. Evidence-based environmental modifications included arranging materials to create increased communication opportunities. Instrumental case study examples and future research directions will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the outcomes of a systematic review of the treatment efficacy literature for individuals with developmental disabilities across the lifespan at the pre-intentional stage of communication.
  • Apply evidence-based communication interventions including the use of unaided and aided AAC for individuals who are pre-intentional to case studies.
  • Apply evidence-based communication partner interventions to case studies of individuals who are pre-intentional.
  • Apply evidence-based environmental modifications to case studies of individuals who are pre-intentional.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

11:30 am-12:30 pm

Session 55Communicating With Families in Early Intervention: A New Approach

Meredith Elkin, MS, CCC-SLP, Midwestern Intermediate Unit IV

This session will discuss the important role early intervention speech-language pathologist’s have when communicating with families. We will discuss the importance of open communication and what ways we have communicated to families in the past, present, and how we may in the future. Additionally, participants will learn the basics of starting an Instagram page to communicate with families and how to incorporate speech and language therapy tips, tools and ideas.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss past, present and future ways to communicate with families.
  • Identify and discuss functional speech therapy tips/tricks to share with families.
  • Explain basics of starting an Instagram page for communication with families.
  • Discuss briefly home based coaching and its importance within early intervention speech.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 56Language Deprivation in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

Kimberly Sanzo, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, Language First

Language deprivation can occur in any child but occurs disproportionately more often in Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children. This presentation will review the signs, symptoms, and treatment of language deprivation in DHH children and how it occurs. It will explain the differential identification of language deprivation from language disorder and will conclude with suggestions for identifying and preventing it in this population.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Name the symptoms and characteristics of language deprivation.
  • Differentiate language deprivation from language disorder.
  • Describe strategies for preventing and treating language deprivation in DHH children.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

11:30 am-12:00 pm

Tech Session 16Individuals’ Ability to Perceptually Differentiate the Aryepiglottic Sphincter Figure Options

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP; Jacob Thomas; Stephanie Maines; Alexandra Long, from Misericordia University

Numerous studies have addressed the differences in the perceptual voice qualities of singers, speakers, and people with voice disorders. Some of these studies have reported acoustic and aerodynamic measures (Bhuta, Patrick & Garnett, 2004; Kent, 1996; Kreiman & Gerratt, 2010); though, a consistent issue across these studies is that the descriptions of the voice qualities used are vague and inconsistent (e.g., hoarse, harsh, breathy). The Estill Voice Model provides a comprehensive framework for categorizing voice qualities into their individual physiologic functions labeled as the actual anatomical structures involved in voice production, called Figures (e.g., True Vocal Folds Body Cover, Larynx,). Only one published study to date has assessed the acoustic and aerodynamic components of the Estill Figure Options of True Vocal Folds Body Cover (TVFBC) and individuals’ ability to differentiate these options (Barone, Ludlow, & Tellis, 2019). Results of this study provided evidence, for the first time, that there are acoustic, aerodynamic differences in the True Vocal Folds Body Cover Options that support listeners’ ability to auditorily perceive a difference. The purpose of this study is to assess the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of expert productions of another Figure, Aryepiglottic Sphincter (AES) and determine if individuals can perceive the difference when provided with a randomized presentation of recorded samples of each figure. Information will be used to help train speech-language pathologists in the production as AES narrow is a common tool used in voice therapy. Results will also be used to help train clients in the perception and production of this Figure.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Assess the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of expert productions of Aryepiglottic Sphincter (AES) Figure.
  • Describe if individuals can perceive the difference between the Aryepiglottic Sphincter in the narrow and wide position when provided with a randomized presentation of recorded samples of each figure.
  • Show speech-language pathologists the production of AES narrow as a common tool used in voice therapy as well as to help train clients in the perception and production of AES.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

Tech Session 17An Innovative Technology in Academia for Administrative Purposes

Reethee Antony, PhD, CCC-SLP; Pamela Rogers; Isabel Falguera; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University

Academia has shifted towards using a variety of software on the teaching end. Recent advances in teaching include software such as Google classrooms, Zoom platform, Blackboard Collaborate, Panopto, Brightspace, Adobe Connect, to name a few. However, on the administrative end, there are very few technological advances and some of the software commonly used include Banner and Oracle. The program administrators and faculty often engage in a variety of tasks in addition to teaching. Some of these responsibilities include advising, sending out student outcomes survey, monitoring mentees-mentors, designing curriculum, monitoring core courses and student performance. Additional responsibilities might include sending out emails to specific cohort of students, allotting faculty to specific courses, monitoring student performance, and maintaining student records. Although there is often software that is used at the university level, it would be beneficial to have all department related work on one platform. The Department of Speech-Language Pathology in Misericordia University collaborated with a software company to design and develop a customized online platform that aids performing and maintaining all the above administration related work in one platform. The software has three levels of access: administrative, staff/faculty and students. This oral presentation will demonstrate the various modules in the software and how administrative related responsibilities of a department can be integrated into one platform.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify two current software that is used for administration purposes in academia.
  • Identify two responsibilities that is involved in administration of department.
  • Discuss the advantages and potential changes for the new software in administration.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Tech Session 18Breath Cycle and Airflow Rate Management

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP; Jacob Thomas; Stephanie Maines; Alexandra Long, from Misericordia University

Breath Cycle (Barone & Tellis, 2018) is a concept that utilizes airflow management and semi-occluded vocal tract principles to pattern speech with breathing and regulate airflow rate for phonation. The Voice and Speech Science Lab at Misericordia University has utilized Breath Cycle when treating individuals with a myriad of voice disorders including paradoxical vocal fold motion/inducible laryngeal obstruction, individuals with fluency disorders including cluttering and stuttering, as well as individuals with motor speech disorders. Breath Cycle requires conscious attention to breathing. Individuals are instructed to quickly exhale through pursed lips like they are blowing out a match. This exhale takes the person to resting expiratory level, or the level reached at the end of a tidal volume exhale before a tidal volume inhalation. The person is then instructed to quickly slurp in with a high tongue position and spread lips. Then the person is asked to count by two, exhale quickly with pursed lips, and then slurp in. The process is continued until the individual reaches ten. The purpose of this study is to provide a systematic review of restrictive breathing techniques and traditional breathing instruction. A comparison of outcome data for these studies will be made with the effects demonstrated by the utilization of Breath Cycle.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the principles of breath cycle.
  • Explain the effects breath cycle has during therapy on different communication disorders.
  • Discuss how restrictive breathing techniques and traditional breathing instruction differ from Breath Cycle.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

Tech Session 19The Impact of Treatment Intensity on Inpatient/Outpatient Rehabilitation Outcomes

Katherine Turner, MS, CCC-SLP, Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital

Individuals with cognitive, communication and swallowing impairments after a stroke or brain injury commonly receive differing intensities of speech-language intervention during an inpatient rehabilitation admission. Despite evidence that increased intensity of total rehabilitation time in the acute recovery period and inclusion of cognitive and communication skill development benefits patients, there is little evidence regarding highly specific interventions in the domains of cognition, communication, and swallowing. Additionally, most research supporting a high intensity rehabilitation program has focused on individuals who have sustained traumatic brain injury and specifically exclude individuals who have sustained a stroke, which causes similar impairments. Heterogeneity of study methodologies has led to inconsistency across studies in demonstrating positive outcomes across all deficit types. No research correlating recovery from dysphagia with intensity of rehabilitation has been conducted, though this is a significant impairment for individuals following stroke and traumatic brain injury. This retrospective study correlates the intensity of speech-language and swallowing treatment during the acute inpatient rehabilitation admission with outcomes achieved both at time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation and time of discharge from outpatient speech therapy services, including specific cognitive and communication domains.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of greater intensity of speech-language services during the acute rehabilitation admission on both short- and long-term recovery of communication, cognitive and swallowing function.
  • Identify areas of impairment or severity of impairment, as well as etiology of impairments that may/may not benefit from a higher intensity of treatment during an inpatient rehabilitation program.
  • Evaluate their own rehabilitation practices for opportunities to improve patient outcomes in relation to the intensity of speech-language therapy provided.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP