Poster Sessions

Thursday, 11:30 am - 1:30 pm

A Holistic Accent Modification Framework for Working With CLD Clients

Katie Bartels, MAT, LSLS Cert. AVEd, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania 

Although speech-language pathologists receive extensive training assessing and treating disorders and differences within speech sound production and language, “accent modification” is a specialized area which often requires additional training beyond one’s graduate studies. Therapy approaches might focus on production of the segmental and suprasegmental aspects of speech without consideration for the larger communication environment in which the speaker operates. In addition, terminology and recommendations for best practices in this area vary widely both within and across disciplines. Accordingly, speech-language pathologists may feel unprepared and uncertain when working with clients seeking accent modification services. The Governor George Leader Speech and Hearing Center at Edinboro University,  through partnership with the Erie location of the United States Center for Refugees and Immigrants, offers a holistic approach to accent modification. Through their “English Pronunciation Training” group, they seek to support the  functional outcomes of individuals who electively seek to improve comprehensibility of spoken English. The goals and structure of the group as well as current terminology and important cultural-linguistic considerations will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Describe English Pronunciation Training services.
  • Recognize the various terminology regarding EPT and the professionals who serve people seeking EPT services.
  • Discuss important considerations pertaining to cultural and linguistic diversity that should be taken into account when providing EPT services.
  • Utilize practical takeaways for clinicians interested in establishing a holistic accent modification group.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

A Systematic Review of AAC Treatments for People With Aphasia

Bruce Wisenburn, PhD, CCC-SLP; Laura Farley, BS; Ashley Faus, BS; Andrew Montgomery, BS; Alexzandra Ramirez, BS; Katherine Yochim, BS; Edward Crawley, PhD, from Marywood University

 

Augmentative-alternative communication (AAC) systems are frequently provided for people with aphasia to improve their expressive communication. To better understand the functionality of AAC for aphasia, a systematic review was conducted to objectively synthesize the literature of experimental studies in this area. Method: A literature search was conducted using the EBSCOHost set of search engines using the terms “augmentative” AND “aphasia” in either the title or abstract fields. This search resulted in 319 hits. To be included in this review, the experimental study needed to provide AAC as a means to improve functional communication and not simply as a therapy method to improve underlying language skills. A total of ten articles were accepted for analysis. For each study, a functional measure of expressive communication with both pre- and post-therapy data was identified. An effect size for the selected measure was calculated using the Comprehensive Meta-analysis Program (Borenstein et al., 2013). In addition, a qualitative analysis for each study will be conducted using the Robint rating scale (Tate et al., 2013). Results: The 10 accepted studies had between one and 10 participants with moderate to severe aphasia. Calculated effect sizes were between 0.47 to 1.87 for language measures such as percent content-information units, proportion of adequate responses or the ability to switch between communication modalities. AAC systems included unaided, low-tech and high-tech systems. Conclusion: Results showed efficacy for the use of AAC to improve the functional expressive communication for people with moderate to severe aphasia.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Identify evidence for treatment related to the provision of AAC for aphasia.
  • Identify the level of evidence and quality of studies for different AAC systems for aphasia.
  • Explain basic AAC approaches for cases of aphasia.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

AAC Treatment for PWA in Virtual World: A Case Series

Chitrali Mamlekar, PhD, Misericordia University; Aimee Dietz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Georgia State University; Delaney Turner; Cassandra Stall, BS; Anna Kate Spotts, MS, CCC-SLP, from University of Cincinnati

 

Although evidence supports the use of tele-practice in stroke-induced aphasia, the research examining its application in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) treatment is limited. While applying tele-practice to the field of AAC based treatment for People with Aphasia (PWA), researchers must consider various factors. These factors include but are not limited to small evidence base; varied technological and clinical expertise; barriers in the workplace; and patient-specific challenges. This poster reports on the production and application phase of the Promoting AAC Induced Language© recovery (PAIL©) tele-practice research project and describes the practical ways to provide AAC treatment for PWA virtually. These consist of screening PWA for issues with hearing or vision; constructing aphasia-friendly slide shows; creating asynchronous training videos for PWA; asking family members to assist with technology; and establishing response modes. Specifically, we describe three case studies (Michelle: Age: 48 years, Months Post Onset=8.4, Aphasia Quotient=34; Barry: Age: 64 years, Months Post Onset=23.8, Aphasia Quotient=92.7; Mark: Age: 53 years , Months Post Onset =54.6, Aphasia Quotient=80.5) involving individuals diagnosed with post-stroke aphasia who underwent six weeks of AAC intervention (i.e., Dietz et.al., 2018). Our aim is to provide initial evidence for the use of tele-practice as a practical method for employing AAC treatment for PWA. Finally, we also offer suggestions for modeling AAC and tips for clinical supervisors who are overseeing the sessions virtually. This topic can direct future researchers and is relevant to practicing clinicians who want to implement AAC-based treatment for PWA.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the current literature demonstrating the patient-specific and clinician-specific challenges in employing AAC based intervention for PWA.
  • Identify at least three factors to consider when selecting PWA for tele-practice services.
  • Explain how tele-practice can be utilized to provide AAC based intervention to PWA.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

COVID-19 Impact on Medical Internship Contact Hours for SLP Students

Delaney Igoe; Erin Clark, MS, CCC-SLP; Lori Lombard, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Recent studies have indicated that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted speech-language pathology services in healthcare settings from referrals, to universal precautions, to assessment and treatment protocols (Chadd, Moyse & Enderby, 2021).  Referrals for dysphagia services remained stable, but referrals for speech, language and communication services decreased by nearly one-third.  However, the caseload services that remained required abruptly modification to service delivery methods to manage dysphagia, voice and upper airway disorders (Doll, Braden & Thibeault, 2020; Zaga, et al, 2020).  Further, clinicians needed to adapt universal precautions with added contact, droplet and airborne precaution specifications (Namasivayam-MacDonald & Riquelme, 2020).  As speech-language pathologists managed the decrease in speech, language and communication services and modifications to their more medical services, the experience of their graduate student interns was impacted as well.  This study compares the clinical contact hour accrual for graduate students during their medical internships before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Results will identify the clinical contact hour impact that the pandemic had on training for graduate students.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the changes in medical speech-language pathology services during the pandemic.
  • Identify the changes in clinical contact hour accrual from pre-pandemic to pandemic medical internship experiences.
  • Identify the clinical contact hour disorder areas that were impacted from pre-pandemic to pandemic medical internship experiences.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Effectiveness of a Summer Intervention Program on Kindergarten Readiness

Nicole Billak, EdD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College

 

While a wealth of knowledge exists supporting the need for early intervention in improving kindergarten readiness, very few programs have offered an evidence-based solution to providing remediation for at-risk children demonstrating weak academic or social readiness skills during the kindergarten registration process. Often, children who are identifies as having weak readiness skills at kindergarten registration will need to wait until school begins in the fall to receive intervention, putting students further at-risk for school failure. The United Way of Mercer County’s Success By 6™ program offers a six-week intervention for students identified during registration as having poor readiness skills. This study determined the effectiveness of Success By 6™ on improving both academic and social readiness skills deemed necessary for school success. A total of 216 students completed the Kindergarten Readiness Test at the beginning and the end of the program. Teachers also rated students’ social emotional learning using the Social Skills Improvement System Social Emotional Learning Progress Monitoring Scales. Results from paired sample t-tests indicated a statistically significant improvement in students’ academic readiness, t(215) = 16.58 p < .001, after completing the program. Students also made statistically significant gains in social emotional skills needed for kindergarten readiness, t(231) = 22.13, p < .001, after participating in the program. Both calculations revealed large effect sizes (d = 1.13 and 1.45, respectively). Implications of this research can effect social change at local, state and federal levels in order to expand evidence-based practices in early childhood education.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three key indicators of kindergarten readiness.
  • Identify three risk factors for school failure.
  • Identify key areas of improvement in this program.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Implementing Language Goals for Remote Learning and Classroom Distancing

Jenifer Ellenberg, MS, CCC-SLP; Karen Rizzo, MA, CCC-SLP, from Western PA School for Blind Children

 

Beginning March 13, 2020, education had to change like no time before. At the Western PA School for Blind Children, our students are legally blind with associated physical and cognitive challenges. How did we make remote learning meaningful and motivating for them? In this poster presentation, we will show online tools and resources for families, students and staff, online and other materials used to support learning, supporting aided and unaided communication and identify classroom distancing strategies. There are so many online resources for school staff and families. Remind and Schoology were the primary apps and sites used by teachers and parents to communicate and to access live or recorded lessons. There are many resources available for activities. YouTube and Wheel-of-Names were the primary apps used for music, stories and games to make remote learning fun and interactive. Remind, Schoology and Zoom lessons were used in conjunction with sending home communication devices and communication systems to describe presentation and level of assistance. Families helping students with nonverbal communication goals were also instructed on how to support their child’s gestures, participation and choice-making opportunities. During the second year of the pandemic, social distancing and health and safety strategies were indicated for the classrooms with students back on campus. There were also students who were still partially or fully remote. Teachers and families had to adapt throughout the year when COVID cases caused the entire school to go remote.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Identify online resources for school staff and families.
  • Identify tools and online materials to make remote instruction possible for visually-impaired students.
  • Identify aided and unaided communication behaviors to facilitate during remote learning.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Language Intervention and Science Curriculum Via Teletherapy: Preliminary Data

Amanda Owen Van Horne, PhD, CCC-SLP; Samantha Weatherford, MS, CCC-SLP, from the University of Delaware

 

During a five-week, in-person summer science camp, children with Developmental Language Disorder demonstrated ability to learn curricular content while simultaneously learning language targets during live, group instruction (McGregor, et al., 2021). In a current, ongoing national virtual study, the science curriculum and language therapy targets of that in-person science summer camp was adapted for tele-instruction. We will compare preliminary pre-post findings of this ongoing study with the prior in-person shortened study, noted changes in children’s science knowledge and targeted language use, and will discuss if preschool and kindergarten children with Developmental Language Disorder appear to learn curricular content and language targets during small group teletherapy.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Describe language targets which can be embedded within existing science curriculum.
  • Compare teletherapy and in-person outcomes of language therapy.
  • Describe tips and strategies for converting in-person therapy to teletherapy.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Little Free Library Initiative at Edinboro University: Improving Literacy Access

Abby Leposa, BS; Ekaterina Merkulov, BS; Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

Little Free Library (LFL) is a nonprofit organization that plays an essential role in improving community access to literacy around the world. Nearly 125,000 LFL units across 100 countries allow people of all ages to gain access to free reading material, despite their socioeconomic or other barriers. The “take a book, share a book” motto encourages people of all ages to celebrate the joy of reading. In 2017, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania initiated a Little Free Library initiative to improve access to literacy throughout Erie county and surrounding regions. To date, Edinboro university, in collaboration with their community partners, have launched over 25 libraries. Dozens of students and faculty from different academic programs created the libraries for diverse sites including: schools, nursing homes, laundry rooms, retail  stores, and more. This poster will highlight the importance for improving community access to literacy and provide practical recommendations on the process of establishing community partnerships and developing, launching, and maintaining a Little Free Library in their own region.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose and importance of the Little Free Library Initiative.
  • Describe how to identify and establish community partnerships for potential LFL sites.
  • Describe the process of creating, launching, and maintaining a library in their own region.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Processing of Speech Sounds: Do Sports People Have Perceptual Advantage?

Reethee Antony, PhD, CCC-SLP; Julianna Simunek; Jenna-Leigh Marrone; Alexandra Woodward; Isabella Fredo; Jenna Palermo; Pamina Nieves, from Misericordia University

 

Higher-order cognitive functioning is different in individuals engaged in team sports. Most of previous research focused on visual processing skills, attention and working memory. There is no research to date that explores the sound perception of healthy team sport players and the presence of possible perceptual advantage. The aim of this study is to examine speech sound processing in team sports-players, in quiet and in noise conditions. Participants include twenty adults (20-45 years of age): ten team sports-players and ten with no experience in sports. Natural digitized paired speech stimuli including /a/-/a/, /a/-/s/, /s/-/a/, /s/-/s/ are presented in two conditions – in quiet and in background noise (speech babble; 0 SNR). The procedure includes a speech discrimination task and a speech identification task. For the identification task, the participants are instructed to press a button (one of four) that corresponds to the stimulus perceived e.g., #1 indicates /a/-/a/, #2 /a/-/s/, #3 /s/-/a/ and #4 /s/-/s/. For the discrimination task, an AX paradigm is used. The participants are instructed to press #1 if ‘X’ is similar to ‘A’; #2 if it is dissimilar, e.g., #1 for /a/-/a/; #2 for /a/-/s/. Percent correct scores and reaction times are measured. The duration of the entire test is 15-20 min. Statistical analyses include a mixed model ANOVA with group, stimuli and condition as factors (p < 0.05). The findings from this research could lead to application of auditory training in rehabilitation of sports players and to compare the effects of sports’ training longitudinally.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of speech sound processing in teams sports players versus non-players.
  • Identify the difference in speech sound processing in quiet versus in noise.
  • Synthesize the differences between speech discrimination versus speech identification tasks.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

SLP Students' Experiences Related to Expanded Use of Educational Technology Due to COVID-19

Emily Adams, BS, Duquesne University; Katherine Carlos, MS, CHAT (Communication, Health, Advocacy, and Therapy); Heather Rusiewicz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Duquesne University

 

Technology use in higher education has become increasingly present across colleges and universities over recent years. However, in March 2020, the immediate and complete reliance upon technology and online learning occurred because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Speech-language pathology (SLP) graduate students and educators adapted to online modalities necessary to support academic and clinical coursework. The purpose of this study is to collect and examine the qualitative perceptions and experiences of graduate SLP students during this time of emergency reliance upon technology for learning due to COVID-19.In this phenomenological study, themes regarding students’ experiences with educational technology for teaching and learning were explored using a social media-style video message board. This study is part of a larger investigation of the use of technology for student learning in SLP undergraduate and graduate programs. Understanding the experiences and perceptions of students regarding technology and virtual learning during this time of emergency closure will provide insight for best practices for the online delivery of clinical and academic instruction in SLP higher education, as well as the use of technology for face-to-face teaching and learning.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the array of educational technology that is available for academic and clinical education in speech-language pathology.
  • Summarize at least two themes related to graduate students’ experiences related to technology during the time of emergency closure due to the pandemic.
  • Describe at least one challenge and one positive effect of the expanded use of educational technology during the time of transition to virtual platforms for SLP graduate students.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Speech in the Spotlight: Integrating Music, Movement and Speech Production

Brooke Yurick; Heather Rusiewicz, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Duquesne University 

The use of music and hand gestures are often integrated into activities that support speech production for children developing speech and for individuals with speech sound disorders. There is a growing body of research to support the use of both music and gesture for these purposes. In recent years, there has been an increased need to access educational materials via digital platforms. However, there are limited available web-based video resources for families, SLPs and educators with a focus on speech development. A novel program, “Speech in the Spotlight”, was initiated to bridge the importance of music and movement in the broader community accessing video-based resources to support speech development. “Speech in the Spotlight” is comprised of brief videos that were produced and will be disseminated on a social media platform. Each of these videos provide instruction on either an individual speech sound or broader concept about the vocal mechanism. These videos incorporate original song-writing, gestures that mirror the spatiotemporal properties of speech (i.e., manual mimicry gestures), and engaging repetition of targets. Connections to principles of community engagement in a digital space, the impact of music and gesture on learning, and the utility of web-based resources on social media platforms will be presented. Additional research avenues and broader implications of research incorporating music and movement into speech therapy will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize key literature regarding the impact of music in speech therapy.
  • Provide at least two examples of manual mimicry gestures used to support speech production.
  • Discuss how music can be integrated with movement to provide additional intervention for children with speech production disorders and beyond.
  • Identify broader implications of video-based instruction via social media platforms in the field of speech-language pathology.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Speech Production Accuracy Under Different Masking Conditions in Typical Children

Sheri Lake, EdD, CCC-SLP, California University of Pennsylvania

 

The year 2020 brought with it a new, vicious and rapidly-spreading virus that forever changed our world. Wearing masks in public places quickly became the new normal for many Americans, including young children. However, little is known about how the pandemic-related restrictions, such as mask-wearing, affect a typically developing three-year old’s ability to accurately produce age appropriate sounds. Fourteen typically developing preschool participants, 10 females and four males, participated in this study. All participants met the following criteria: no history of a speech delay; no history of a language delay; and were between the ages of 3:1 and 3:11. Data were collected on the participants’ ability to accurately produce the phonemes /p, b, d, m, n, h, w, t, k, g, ŋ, f and j/. Data were collected twice; once when the researcher was wearing a blue surgical mask and again, when the researcher was wearing a white surgical mask with a clear, plastic insert in which the participants could see the researcher’s mouth. These types of masks were used because the researcher was interested in seeing if the type of mask worn affected a typically developing three year old’s ability to accurately produce age appropriate phonemes. The results of this study will be used to evaluate the type of mask worn on a typically developing child’s speech sound production.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Determine relevant pandemic-related restrictions that may affect a child’s speech sound development.
  • Identify at least one possible advantage of wearing a transparent mask.
  • Identify at least one possible disadvantage of wearing a surgical mask.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The Evolution of Caregiver Involvement in the Age of COVID-19

Brittany Mooney, BA; Reethee Antony, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University

 

The world had to quickly shift to meet the needs of patients with the abrupt onset of COVID-19. New challenges were presented to clinicians and caregivers when a triadic approach to remediation including the caregiver, client and the clinician became a necessity. Given the changes that have occurred in the dynamics of service delivery, there is a need to understand if involvement itself has evolved and how caregivers perceive a client’s progress and the use of teletherapy. The aim of the study was to explore the evolution of caregiver involvement since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. A brief survey, using a Likert scale was used to examine these relationships between the use of teletherapy as the primary means of service provision and caregiver involvement. Participants were recruited from the Speech-Language and Hearing Center at Misericordia University. An invitation email was sent to all clients who participated in teletherapy through the university clinic since the onset of COVID-19. The survey was anonymous and was designed to be completed in five to 10 minutes by primary caregivers of the clients. Twenty-two respondents completed the survey. Descriptive analysis was done; mean values and standard deviations were computed. Statistical analyses were done and the results were considered significant if p < 0.05. Thematic analysis was done on the qualitative data. The results of the study help towards developing a foundational framework of understanding the effectiveness of teletherapy. It also gives us an insight into other variables that could impact the effectiveness of teletherapy.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the caregivers’ perspectives of involvement in the client’s therapeutic experience specific to online speech services.
  • Describe the interaction of other variables that could potentially contribute to caregivers’ perception of teletherapy.
  • Describe the evolution of caregiver involvement in service delivery specifically post COVID-19.
  • Identify the trends and potential changes in service delivery post-COVID-19.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Using Computer-Based Cadaveric Dissection to Learn Anatomy and Physiology

Emily Magrini, BS; Julia Regnault, BS; Megan Fenstermaker; Faith Foster; Brooke Penrod; Emily Redhouse, BS; Samantha Delmar; Rebecca Russo; Quinn Kelley, BS; Jillian Scanlon, BS; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, from Misericordia University

 

The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the benefits of using a computer-based cadaver to allow students to learn concepts of anatomy and physiology. Understanding the concepts of anatomy and physiology is a crucial skill in becoming a successful speech-language pathologist. Having knowledge of the various structures of the human body and how they function is key to understanding the areas speech-language pathologists need for their professions (e.g., brain, larynx, ears, lungs, etc.). The use of a computer-based cadaver can be helpful in teaching. It can also be used as a study method for students to have a visual representation of what they are learning. This virtual dissection table—Anatomage, will help provide students with the knowledge of anatomy needed for clinical settings and beyond. The computer-based cadaver program currently has four complete body cadavers as well as high-resolution images of regional anatomy. Students can view the different cadavers, perform dissections of the body and rotate the body 360 degrees. Another valuable feature includes the histology section composed of microscopic images of cells. These advanced actions assist in ensuring an optimal learning experience for students. This technology will help students enhance their knowledge for educational, clinical and research purposes. Students can reinforce and expand upon what they learn in the classroom through hands-on experiences with the computer-based cadavers.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how to navigate the computer-based cadaver technology.
  • Discover the advantages of utilizing cadaver technology to help support the education of speech-language pathology students.
  • Recognize how to use digital cadaver technology for growth in both professional and educational settings.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

What Digital Technologies Do SLPs Use to Assess/Treat Fluency Disorders?

Jillian Scanlon, BS; Quinn Kelley, BS; Megan Fenstermaker; Faith Foster; Brooke Penrod; Emily Redhouse, BS; Samantha Delmar; Rebecca Russo, from Misericordia University; Erik Raj, PhD, CCC-SLP, Monmouth University; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

 

The purpose of this study was to explore the types of digital materials utilized by speech-language pathologists in the assessment and treatment of fluency disorders. Speech-language pathologists were provided with a survey about the digital technologies they use for assessing and treating individuals with fluency disorders. The electronic survey collected qualitative and quantitative data. Likert-type, yes/no and open-ended questions were included. Some questions referred to their comfortability assessing and treating fluency disorders, their experience with digital technologies for assessing and treating fluency disorders, whether they believed that more resources were needed to find functional digital technologies to assess and treat fluency disorders and which form of digital technology was preferred and why. Preliminary findings indicate that only 25 percent of clinicians utilize digital technologies when assessing individuals with fluency disorders and almost 55 percent use digital technologies for fluency treatment. Results demonstrate that there are a multitude of digital assessment and treatment materials that can be used for fluency disorders, such as Boom cards, apps and online games. However, over 80 percent of clinicians agree or strongly agree that clinicians simply need more resources to find effective digital technologies to assess and treat fluency disorders. Additional findings will be discussed at the convention. As insurance agencies and Medicare continue to approve payments for teletherapy, these findings are relevant to future telemedicine in the field of speech-language pathology. Ultimately, clinicians and clients will benefit from the growth and development of future therapy options.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Learn the various types of digital technologies that speech-language pathologists are using to assess individuals with fluency disorders.
  • Discover what types of digital technologies speech-language pathologists are using to treat individuals with fluency disorders.
  • Learn about the need for more information about digital technologies to assess and treat fluency disorders.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

What Technologies do Students use to Assess/Treat Fluency Disorders?

Quinn Kelley, BS; Jillian Scanlon, BS; Brooke Penrod; Faith Foster; Megan Fenstermaker; Emily Redhouse, BS; Samantha Delmar; Rebecca Russo, from Misericordia Univeristy; Erik Raj, PhD, CCC-SLP, Monmouth University; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University

 

The purpose of this study was to explore the digital materials utilized by student clinicians in the assessment and treatment of fluency disorders. Speech-language pathology student clinicians were provided with a survey about the digital technologies they use for assessing and treating individuals with fluency disorders. The electronic survey collected qualitative and quantitative data. Some questions included their comfortability in relation to assessing and treating fluency disorders, whether they have used digital technologies for assessing and treating fluency disorders, whether they believed that more resources were needed to find effective digital technologies to assess and treat fluency disorders and which type of digital technology was their favorite and why. Preliminary findings indicate that only 28 percent of student clinicians agree or strongly agree that they are comfortable assessing individuals with fluency disorders, whereas 56 percent are comfortable treating fluency disorders. The results also show that 30 percent of clinicians have used digital technologies to assess fluency disorders and 60 percent have used digital technology to treat fluency disorders. Almost 90 percent of student clinicians believe they need more resources to find effective digital technologies. Additional results will be discussed at the Convention. Information obtained from this study will provide students with a better understanding of the digital technologies that speech-language pathology student clinicians use to assess and treat fluency disorders. These findings will shape future student training at university programs. Student clinicians and university programs will know which digital therapy options are the most widely used, most efficient and easiest to use with fluency clients.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Identify numerous versions of digital technologies student clinicians are using to assess individuals with fluency disorders.
  • Determine the various types of digital technologies speech-language pathology student clinicians are utilizing to treat individuals with fluency disorders.
  • Identify areas to shape future student training at university programs.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Thursday, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Compensation for Coarticulation in Typical Listening Situations

Tessa Arguello; Christian Zapata; Navin Viswinathan, PhD, from Pennsylvania State University

 

Listeners during speech perception are faced with variability due to speakers’ coarticulation. In speech production, coarticulation is the process by which a speech sound is influenced by a preceding or following speech sound(s). Compensation for Coarticulation (CfC) is the phenomenon in which listeners compensate for a change in a speaker’s target production. There are two primary explanations for this phenomenon. Per the gestural account, CfC occurs because the listener perceives places of articulation and vocal tract gestures that contribute to the production of the auditory signal in speech. Per the spectral contrast account, CfC occurs because the listener perceives the differing frequencies in the auditory signal in speech. Previous CfC studies investigated a change in talker; however, CfC research is limited on the presence of spectral contrast effects when competing speech is introduced. We aim to conduct two experiments, utilizing typical liquid-stop disyllables, to explore CfC in a setting depicting a real-world speech environment. In experiments 1a and 1b, two competing speech precursors precede the target. Experiment 1a instructs participants to listen to the precursor spoken by the same talker as the target, but in 1b, they are instructed to listen to the precursor spoken by a different talker than the target. Experiment 2 consists of the same structure as experiment 1, but a competing target is added. The competing speech context is referred to as the “cocktail party” setting (Bosker et. al, 2020). This study’s aspiration is to demonstrate how competing sounds can affect speech perception in everyday life.

 

  • Identify challenges listeners face due to speech variabilityIdentify challenges listeners face due to speech variability
  • Evaluate multiple accounts of speech variability
  • Describe the need for examining speech variability in conditions resembling everyday speech

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Counseling Services in Aphasia Rehabilitation: The Effects of an Online Training and Interprofessional Collaboration

Joanne Niemkiewicz, MS, CCC-SLP; Chaleece Sandberg, PhD, CCC-SLP; Lauren Parker, Med; Anne Marie Kubat, MS, CCC-SLP; Kristen Nadermann, PhD; Liza Conyers, PhD, from Pennsylvania State University

 

People with aphasia (PWA) are not having their mental health needs met. This issue may be partially attributed to a lack of training and support for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in counseling skills resulting in lower SLP confidence. In addition, professionals in counseling typically do not receive adequate training in aphasia or supported communication techniques for PWA. The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility and pilot the effectiveness of a program to improve counseling services for PWA by providing a brief training for SLPs and rehabilitation counselors and measuring therapeutic outcomes of a PWA. The training, created collaboratively by licensed SLPs and rehabilitation counselors, focuses on general aphasia education, supported conversation techniques for aphasia, mental health issues in aphasia, screening PWA for referral to counseling services and professional collaborations. Two clinicians, a counselor and SLP, jointly provided counseling to an individual with chronic aphasia after they completed the training. The PWA reported psychosocial improvements following the therapy. Also, she demonstrated improved communication skills in conversations with the clinicians after they completed the training and more improvement at the conclusion of therapy. The counselor also demonstrated better skills supporting the PWA’s communication after the training with larger improvements by the end of the therapy. The SLP demonstrated improved counseling skills by the end of the therapy. Overall, the training and collaborative therapy had a positive effect on the PWA and the clinicians. This study provides preliminary findings and guidance on future data collection and suggested modifications to the training.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Identify specific challenges people with aphasia face in receiving adequate counseling services.
  • List at least three counseling techniques that speech-language pathologists can utilize in their practice with people with aphasia.
  • Explain the benefits of interprofessional education and practice between speech-language pathologists and professional counselors on counseling in aphasia.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Critical Appraisal of Cognitive Communication Treatment for Adults With a TBI

Kayla Devine, BA; Claudia Krautkremer, BA; Meara Kuhfahl, BA; Taylor Kishbaugh, BS; Lousie Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Moravian University

 

The field of speech-language pathology is making substantial advancements in the treatment of traumatic brain injuries. One such area of study is cognitive communication treatment (Togher et al., 2014), which this CAT paper aims to scrutinize. Literature on cognitive communication treatment for traumatic brain injuries was searched for, initially in conjunction with social communication treatment as a comparison. The majority of our studies (Cochran D’Angelo et al., 2021; Copley et al., 2015; Gilmore et al., 2019; Ownsworth et al., 2017) found evidence that correlated to cognitive communication strategies as being effective for treating deficits due to a traumatic brain injury.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Define cognitive communication treatment.
  • Evaluate the evidence for cognitive communication treatment.
  • Understand ways to implement cognitive communication treatment in the practice of speech-language pathology.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Engaging Young Children in Teletherapy: What About Screen Time?

Patricia Swasey Washington, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University

 

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, speech-language services were largely switched to a virtual/telepractice format to ensure the health safety of clients, their family members and service providers. While telepractice can be an effective option, involving many benefits, there have been challenges, including participation of parents or caregivers and appropriately engaging young children via a screen. This presentation will discuss challenges of engaging young children during teletherapy in a university speech-language clinic, as well as share suggestions provided by the clinical supervisor that facilitated effective speech-language intervention. Included are strategies for the successful collaboration with parents/caregivers and decreased screen time for young children. Implications for telepractice throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond will be also discussed.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss two challenges encountered by student speech-language clinicians when engaging virtually with young clients.
  • Describe two strategies for effective collaboration with parents or caregivers during teletherapy.
  • Describe two strategies for maintaining the attention of young children during teletherapy, while limiting screen time.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

 

Find the Right Fit: Interview Skills for Clinical Fellows

Elise Lindquist, MS, CCC-SLP, The Pennsylvania State University; Jennifer Rakers, LSLS Cert AVT, CCC-SLP, UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh

 

How confident are you in your interview skills? After years in an academic program, graduate students in speech-language pathology will emerge into a professional world upon graduation. With varying preparation, students may have learned general rules on this process, but may not yet feel confident on how to adequately job search and interview. This poster will provide learning strategies and techniques to prepare students to interview in a variety of clinical settings.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Identify resources to search and apply for clinical fellowship positions.
  • Utilize strategies for evaluating job descriptions and/or postings.
  • Describe specific interview preparation strategies.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Ice Cream and Swallowing: When Worlds Collide

Caroline Brindo, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, MBS Envision; R. Gregg Strain, ChemServe

 

A couple years ago, there was a pretty vigorous Facebook post on ice cream and many MANY speech-language pathologists voiced their “knowledge” that ice cream should be considered a thin liquid-since it melts-and therefore patients with dysphagia that are currently ordered to a thick liquid should not be “allowed” to have ice cream. Having grown up with basically all the ice cream I ever wanted-especially when I was lucky enough to spend the day at the dairy plant with my dad-cruising down the vats with cup in hand, pouring out whatever I felt like-this struck me as really, really bad … and maybe inaccurate. So I called my dad. Which launched into a couple long discussions about milk fat, overrun, thickening agents and ice content. The sum of which is: ice cream has a ton of variables and we really shouldn’t be denying it to patients just based on what we think we “know.” In this poster, we assessed the melting speed of various types of ice cream and used the IDDSI syringe test method for melted and non-melted ice cream to determine the accuracy of what we think we know about ice cream. This swallow specialist daughter and dairy chemist father teamed up for an interesting and informative poster.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Name three variables in ice cream products that can impact the thickness to which it melts.
  • Name three variables in ice cream products that can impact the melting speed.
  • Name three variables in storage and serving that can impact ice cream consistency.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Quality of Written Discourse for Children With Oral Language Disorders

Victoria Boland, BS; Alexandra Reifer, BS; Paige Wyszynski, BS; Morgan Blessing, BA, from Moravian University; Rebecca Bawayan, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian University

 

A critically appraised topic (CAT) is a brief review of best available evidence for a clinically relevant topic. The purpose of this CAT was to identify the risks for decreased quality (length, content, complexity etc.) of written narrative and discourse passage for children with oral language disorders. Currently, there is limited evidence demonstrating the differences on linguistic quality and complexity of narrative and expository discourse for students with oral language disorders. Written narrative skills are a key component in the educational process for school-age children. It is important to know if students with oral language disorders are at a higher risk for deficits in written discourse skills due to the reciprocal relationship between oral and written language. Understanding the effects of oral language disorders on the quality of narrative skills will allow speech language pathologists (SLPs) to support academic and workplace success. The risk of deficits in written discourse was considered through a review of four studies. This session will discuss the methodology and findings of the CAT. Implications for current practice and areas of need for further research will be discussed.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of oral language skills for written discourse.
  • Explain the search, summary of evidence and findings of the critically appraised topic.
  • Identify implications for practice and future research.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Reliability of “Voice Tools” for Measurement of Vocal Fundamental Frequency

Elaine Shuey, PhD, CCC-SLP: Julia Kutz, BS; Spring 2021 Speech Science Class, from East Stroudsburg University

 

A variety of apps are available for tablets and smart phones that measure several aspects of voice. Therapists are using these for diagnostics and therapy with voice and transgender clients. While handy to use both physically and financially, not all such apps have been evaluated for the validity and reliability of their measures. The Spring 2021 Speech Science class evaluated the reliability of the popular app Voice Tools as a measure of vocal fundamental frequency in a sustained vowel.  All students downloaded the app and participated in a training on Zoom regarding procedures to measure the voice samples. They took two samples within 48 hours, with at least 24 hours between the first and second samples. They served as their own subjects and also evaluated any willing adult volunteers in their environment, as the entire semester was being conducted remotely.  A total of 63 samples were obtained. A paired t-test of the first and second trial data resulted in a P of 0.9860, thus showing that the app was a reliable tool for the measurement of vocal Fo in a prolonged /a/. Additional analyses (gender, age) revealed similar results.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Name three concerns about the use of telephone/tablet apps for voice analysis.
  • Assess an app that is commonly used to analyze fundamental frequency.
  • Explain the reliability of this app for the measurement of Fo

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Semantic Development of Children With Down Syndrome Who Use AAC

Sharon Sternfeld, MS, Pennsylvania State University

 

Children with Down syndrome (DS) are typically late talkers; this delay affects their early symbolic development tremendously. To date, there has been limited research on the first words of children with DS who receive early augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention. This poster presents a detailed case study of the first words expressed by a child with DS and complex communication needs (age 17-21 months) who was introduced to signs and AAC technology with visual scene displays (VSDs), digitized speech output and “just in time” (JIT) programming of vocabulary in the moment in response to the child’s needs and interests. The concepts expressed by the child using AAC and speech during free play interactions in her daycare setting were analyzed across a 5-month period and compared with core vocabulary lists (Banajee et al., 2003; Beukelman et al., 1989; Fried-Oken et al., 1992; Geist et al., 2021, Trembath et al., 2007) and with the MacArthur Bates Communication Development Inventory (CDI, Fenson et al., 1994). The child expressed a total of 49 unique concepts over the five-month period; the vast majority were content words (61 percent nouns; eight percent action concepts; 13 percent descriptors; 13 percent social words); only three percent were function words. Only 8 percent of the concepts were on any of the core vocabulary lists; however, 85 percent appeared on the CDI. Early AAC intervention provided this child with the tools to acquire first words at an earlier age, thus facilitating the transition to symbolic communication as a foundation to language development.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the early communication development of children with Down syndrome.
  • Explain the effect of early AAC intervention (both aided and unaided) on the acquisition of first words by a young child with DS.
  • Describe the first words expressed by a young child with DS (age 17-21 months).
  • Explain the implications for vocabulary selection for young children with DS and discuss the effectiveness of various vocabulary selection tools (e.g., core vocabulary lists, MacArthur Bates CDI).

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Shifting Pulmonary Practice Patterns for Tracheostomy Management

Midori Stoddard, MS, CCC-SLP, Good Shepherd Penn Partners

 

The use of heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs) has been historically appreciated for persons with total laryngectomies. The benefits of HME use and implementation as an integral part of continuum of care for persons with tracheostomies has only recently been widely acknowledged in the US. A tracheostomy bypasses the upper airway. When breathing through a tracheostoma, the important, natural humidification and filtration functions of the upper airway, oropharynx and oral/nasal cavities are lost. The tracheostomy creates an open portal of entry for unconditioned air, microbes and other fine airborne particles into the lower airways. Use of an HME helps to replace the loss of heat and moisture and, in some cases, filters the air both during inhalation and exhalation and can offer an option for voicing. With an HME, there is the opportunity to replace the more commonly used external humidifier, the trach collar. Some benefits of replacing the trach collar include, improving comfort and sleep, increasing compliance and independence and reducing frequent suctioning, excessive mucous and coughing and mucous plugs. At our hospital, we serve a wide array of patients with complex otorhinolaryngology needs, including those who may require a tracheostomy for an indefinite amount of time. Our goal is to share the basic benefits of HME use with tracheostomies, discuss decision making for HME implementation in addition to/conjunction with one way speaking valve use, give direction for developing use in the acute care hospital setting, discuss roadblocks met and share resources available.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the role of heat and moisture exchangers for tracheostomies.
  • List at least three benefits of heat and moisture exchangers for tracheostomies.
  • Discuss how speech-language pathologists can implement the use of heat and moisture exchangers in a particular practice setting.

 

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

SLP Students' Perspectives on Donducting a Disability Awareness Virtual Service-Learning Project in India

Ariel Cohen; Victoria Boland; Grace Crawford; Sulsabeel Akram; Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Moravian University

 

Promoting public awareness about developmental disabilities, including those resulting from communication disorders and about habilitation and rehabilitation options is part of the prevention and advocacy responsibilities of speech-language pathologists (SLP). International service-learning projects provide graduate SLP students a unique opportunity to gain exposure to global perspectives on communication disorders and understand the constraints of attitudinal, policy and resource barriers to timely rehabilitation provision. This presentation illustrates SLP students learning about ways to increase high school students’ knowledge about disability and rehabilitation and self-reflection on using service-learning to examine cultural biases and learn culturally appropriate interaction practices. Methods – Four SLP graduate students worked with an SLP faculty to lead a 10-week long virtual awareness provision project with synchronous and asynchronous learning modules. Students from education and three sister rehabilitation programs were also invited to share their expertise. Each week, the SLP student leads reflection on their learning and thoughts regarding the project. Results – SLP’s students’ experience with increasing high school students’ knowledge about disability and rehabilitation will be presented using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association “Take Five” advocacy framework, which includes educate, participate, elevate, collaborate and allocate. A thematic analysis of weekly self-reflection data that shows SLP students learning to check cultural biases and gradually developing culturally appropriate interaction practices will also be discussed. In conclusion, participation in this project facilitated the student SLPs learning about advocating for rehabilitation professions and working towards improving the quality of life of persons with disabilities from diverse backgrounds.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Evaluate the benefit of technology (zoom, learning platforms) to deliver synchronous and asynchronous presentations for a productive learning experience.
  • Discuss the importance of gaining a global perspective regarding disability and the awareness of rehabilitation professionals around the world.
  • Describe the benefit of using international service-learning experiences to examine cultural biases and learn culturally appropriate interaction practices.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Studying Linguistic Release From Masking Using Coordinate Response Measures

Cheyanne Waller; Grace Caplan; Navin Viswanathan, PhD, from The Pennsylvania State University

 

In typical listening, the recognition of speech is especially difficult when there is other competing speech. While speech-in-speech recognition can be challenging, under certain conditions, listeners’ performance may improve — a phenomenon called release from masking. In this project we focus on Linguistic Release from Masking (LRM; Brouwer et al., 2012) , the finding that perception of the target improves when the languages of the target and background speech differ. Past studies of LRM have typically used sentence transcription tasks that do not provide reaction time measures and have to be manually scored. Here we investigate whether we can replicate typical LRM effects using a widely used database called Coordinate Response Measures (CRM; Eddins & Liu, 2012). The advantage of CRM sentences is that they follow a consistent structure that include a color and a number. By examining listeners’ reports of presented colors and numbers, we can simultaneously measure accuracy and reaction time to each target item. If we are able to replicate typical LRM effects with the new paradigm we can both automate the administration of these tasks and examine the time course of LRM effects.

 

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this poster, participants will be able to:

  • Define Linguistic Release from Masking.
  • Describe Coordinate Response Measures.
  • Evaluate whether typical masking effects are replicated.

 

Level of Instruction: Introductory