Contact Us  | Member Login  |  Site Map
 
Go To:

Wednesday Sessions

Thursday Sessions
Morning Sessions
Afternoon Sessions

Friday Sessions
Morning Sessions
Afternoon Sessions

Saturday Sessions

Poster Presentations

Welcome

Registration

Highlighted Presenters

Sheraton Station Square

Continuing Education

Exhibit at PSHA

Convention Progam

Wednesday, April 1

6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Seminar 1 PSHA Town Hall Meeting

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of PSHA Executive Board members to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology, including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate-level training programs and state licensure requirements. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Audience members will be given an opportunity to ask questions and contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes : At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the history of Pennsylvania licensure and certification requirements related to the schools.
• Identify at least three issues impacting service delivery.
• List pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

8:15 pm - 9:15 pm

Seminar 2 Professional Roundtable Discussions

Erin Lundblom, PhD, CCC-SLP

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

These discussions will provide an opportunity for professionals to engage in dynamic roundtables to discuss important workplace issues with colleagues from across the state. We will have several roundtables to choose from including: early Intervention, school setting, acute/rehab setting, skilled nursing facility/home health, higher education and audiology. Each discussion will have a facilitator to encourage discussion points. It will be a great opportunity to share best practices, concerns and questions with colleagues in similar work settings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe concerns facing professionals in specific work settings.
• Describe best practices for assessment, treatment and documentation.
• Describe strategies to improve professional service delivery.

THURSDAY, APRIL 2

8:00 am - 9:00 am

Seminar 3 A Telehealth Experience Within a University Speech and Hearing Clinic

Elaine Shuey, PhD, East Stroudsburg University
Megan Lawrence, BS, East Stroudsburg University
Samantha Ward, BS, East Stroudsburg University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Telehealth is being used in a variety of work settings to deliver speech and language services. Information about this topic is infused into graduate classes but the ability to practice telehealth is often missing from a graduate program. In order to provide graduate student clinicians with a telehealth experience, an IRB was obtained and every clinic student in the East Stroudsburg University (ESU) graduate program completed one telehealth experience. The student clinician worked in one therapy room while her actual client sat in a therapy room that simulated a home environment. The clinician and client communicated through Zoom using iPads. A secure link had been created by IT and was used for each session. The student was permitted to choose any of her clients for the experience and all clients who were involved had agreed to do this and signed informed consent. The student conducted the session for one hour, targeting goals that had already been established for the client. Parents stayed with their children who were clients. Some spouses of adult clients also stayed in the room. Following the session, both the student clinician and the client/parent/spouse completed an evaluation of the session. The evaluation consisted of several statements for which the completer simply circled a rating number of one to six indicating strongly disagree to strongly agree. Both the student and the client were also encouraged to write comments. This presentation will cover the basics of telehealth, the procedures listed above, security issues and the outcomes of the experiences.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe basic concepts related to telehealth in our field.
• Explain the procedures used in this telehealth experience.
• Explain and interpret the outcomes of the project, including benefits and pitfalls as both treatment and education.

8:00 am - 9:30 am

Seminar 4 An Exploration of the Relationship Between Verbal Communication Behaviors, Personal Identity and Stress

Leah B. Helou, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh Department of Communication Science & Disorders

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

An individual's communication behaviors are often tightly linked to their internal sense of self, and might be readily impacted by stress. In fact, the idea that stress can influence voice and speech is a diagnostic and therapeutic linchpin in the speech-language pathology realm of so-called “functional disorders.” However, substantially less attention is paid to the relevance and impact of patients' personal identity as it pertains to their verbal communication behaviors. In this presentation, Dr. Helou will introduce core concepts of self and identity; review research on how stress impacts voice and speech; discuss relationships between personal identity and communication behaviors; and attempt to integrate these phenomena in a manner that is useful for clinical practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List three core concepts of self and identity.
• Identify three ways that voice and speech can be perturbed in the face of stress.
• Summarize how listeners perceive personality traits of a speaker based on brief speech samples.

Seminar 5 Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI) and AAC: Helping Students Find Their Voice

Greg Lazur, MEd, PaTTAN
Jennifer Geibel, EdD, CCC-SLP, PaTTAN

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI) is the leading cause of visual impairment in young children in developed countries. It is a condition that may impact the child’s functional use of vision and is complicated by the fact that the child’s visual ability is greatly impacted by the surrounding environment. Speech-language pathologists may find that children with CVI require adjustments to therapy materials and treatment settings. CVI even has implications for how children access and utilize augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) materials and devices. This presentation by educational consultants from the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) will introduce participants to CVI and explore how this condition may impact children’s exposure to and use of language. Participants will be encouraged to consider their own classrooms and therapy environments and the effect that elements such as visual complexity, distance and lighting might have on a student with CVI. Furthermore, participants will also discuss considerations surrounding the selection and utilization of AAC materials, features and devices for students with CVI. Ultimately, this session will assist SLPs in helping their students with CVI find their voice through successful utilization of AAC.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify five characteristics of the vision of children with CVI.
• Describe three aspects of the environment that may be adjusted to maximize the success of students with CVI.
• Assess three aspects of AAC features that may be impacted by CVI.

Seminar 6 Developing Critical Thinking Skills Through Clinical Education

Cheryl Messick, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

As the disciplines of speech-language pathology and audiology expand in terms of the research base and scope of practice, it is imperative that strategies be implemented to promote the development of critical thinking skills in future clinicians. Critical thinking skills include “purposeful, self-regulatory judgement which results in interpretation, analysis, evaluation and inference” (Facione, 1990). When students graduate and practice clinically, they need to consciously evaluate their knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis to ensure that best practice services are provided to clients. Clinical education provides an ideal environment for promoting the development of critical thinking skills, therefore it is important for those who supervise students to have an understanding of and skills to facilitate these abilities. This session focuses on developing critical thinking skills through two clinical teaching pathways: 1. the use of questioning techniques; and 2. engagement in reflective practice. Two frameworks will be presented for considering questioning strategies (Bloom’s Taxonomy and the Supervision-Questioning-Feedback (SQF) Model). Research on the use of questioning in clinical education will be presented to provide guidelines on how to develop question forms that propel students towards higher levels of thinking. Background will be provided on what reflective practice is and factors which play a role in promoting active student engagement in self-reflection. A framework for considering reflective practice (Findlay, 2008) will be utilized to consider venues for developing reflective practice and strategies for promoting critical reflections. Participants will apply concepts to develop question forms and to design a set of reflective practice activities.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Compare and contrast Bloom's Taxonomy and the SQF Model as frameworks for developing question forms.
• Formulate a set of questions on a target content area appropriate for a beginning-level student, a mid-level student and an advanced-level student.
• Complete a reflective practice activity for two different levels of students (beginning and advanced).
• Describe two methods for modeling reflective practice to a student.

Seminar 7 Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing: Past, Present and Future

Roxann Diez Gross, PhD, CCC-SLP, Swallowing Diagnostics
Marybeth Trapani-Hanasewych, MS, CCC-SLP

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

This presentation will provide a foundation of pediatric feeding/swallowing and continue through to current and future clinical applications. The etiologies of feeding disorders will include, medical, sensory, behavioral and motor. How to apply current methods of feeding strategies to the right person. Pediatric breathing and swallowing research will be reviewed with suggested clinical applications for management of esophageal dysphagia.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Recognize the categories of feeding disorders.
• Describe the similarities and differences between methods.
• Explain how breathing and swallowing interact in typical and atypical children.
• Describe the esophageal phase of swallowing.

Seminar 8 Supportive Reading Comprehension Strategies for People With Aphasia

Sarah Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP, Duquesne University

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Strategies to support reading comprehension for people with aphasia are often overlooked despite the chronic and persistent changes in participation many people with aphasia experience related to reading deficits. Current research related to technology and non-technology based supports for reading comprehension will be discussed. Strategies will include aphasia-friendly modifications to written texts and implementation of text-to-speech systems which features may support reading comprehension for some people with aphasia.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe three modifications to rehabilitation materials to support reading comprehension.
• List three feature considerations for text-to-speech systems.
• Describe three features of preferred reading supports.

9:15 am - 10:15 am

Seminar 9 Telepractice in Schools--Common Challenges and Solutions

Tami Radzai, MA, CCC-SLP, PresenceLearning

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

The nationwide shortage of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) presents a challenge for school districts to staff caseloads and stay in compliance. According to a recent survey, 65 percent of undergraduate and graduate student participants showed a preference for working in a health care setting rather than in a school setting. This discrepancy may further perpetuate the shortage of SLPs in the schools. As a result, many school districts are looking for alternative solutions to employee staffing. With the growth of telepractice as a mainstream option, school districts are choosing to contract with agencies that can provide them with credentialed SLPs on an as-needed basis.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify the necessary components of a high-quality telepractice service delivery model.
• List five challenge areas that are unique to providing services to a school via telepractice.
• List potential solutions for each challenge area.

10:00 am - 11:30 am

Seminar 10 Clinical Practice Recommendations for Managing Communication and Swallowing Impairments in Patients With Tracheostomies

Christine Matthews, CScD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

In 2016, the Veterans Health Administration developed a set of clinical practice guidelines for managing the communication and swallowing impairments in patients with tracheostomies on and off the ventilator. This session will review the need for and development and implementation of these guidelines as well as how these guidelines have transformed care of this population at VA Medical Centers throughout the country.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Summarize the need for standardizing care in complex populations.
• List the nine clinical practice recommendations formulated for this population.
• Describe the steps they can take at their institutions to standardize patient care with this population.

Seminar 11 Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Case Studies Problem Solving

Marcel Paules-Broadway, MS, CCC-SLP, St. Luke’s/Cindy Miles Pediatrics

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

This presentation is valuable and applicable to all SLPs and OTs working with infants and children with varying dysphagia scenarios and severities. Case studies and audience participation will discuss assessment, treatment and problem solving for infants and children with feeding and swallowing disorders, including behavioral, sensory, prematurity, genetic, medical complexity and family inclusion. This is a practical avenue for increasing practical knowledge of feeding and swallowing and how to elicit positive outcomes despite multiple barriers.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List at least three different oral feeding strategies with indications and contraindications for each.
• Describe the complex oral sensory needs of medically complex children and those with oral/pharyngeal dysphagia.
• Explain the advantages and disadvantages of home vs. clinic vs. community-based services for children with oral feeding and swallowing concerns.
• List the professional involved in pediatric dysphagia and their roles in evaluation and intervention.

Seminar 12 Strategies for Working With Challenging Situations in Clinical Education

Cheryl Messick, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

The purpose of this seminar is to provide speech-language pathologists and audiologists who supervise student clinicians with knowledge and skills to approach challenging situations in clinical education. Challenging situations arise in clinical education when a student is not making adequate progress or is not meeting the requirements of the placement or their program (Lacasse, Theoret, Skalenda & Lee, 2012). Research suggests that challenges in clinical education typically fall into the following categories: cognitive; communication; metacognitive; professionalism and/or mental health concerns. In today’s environment of high productivity and fast-paced service delivery, a clinical educator’s effectiveness can be enhanced by having a clear framework for approaching challenging situations. Additionally, graduate programs in speech-language pathology and audiology have a vested interest in identifying students who are struggling early on so that steps can be taken to support student learning and facilitate progress on meeting program expectations. Research from multi-disciplinary areas will be presented on common types of difficulties that students experience and strategies that have been utilized to help improve performance. A Remediation Framework (Cook, Tillard, Messick, 2019) will be presented that includes the following structured steps: identify concerns; communicate; reflect; collaborate and review progress. Participants will apply the framework to scenarios to develop remediation plans for some common clinical education challenges.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe three examples of challenging student behaviors.
• Identify the components of a framework for developing a remediation plan for an at-risk student.
• Describe three different strategies to use when working with a student who is not performing adequately.

Seminar 13 Talk the Walk: Co-Emergence and Co-Dependence of Movement and Language

Regina Harbourne, PhD, PT, PCS, FAPTA, Duquesne University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Pediatric therapists trained in specialty areas such as physical therapy and speech therapy provide skilled expertise within their individual domains, as well as engage in interdisciplinary activity with each other. However, current neuroscience reveals that our areas of expertise may be an artificial division, with co-dependency of systems being more the norm. This presentation will focus on the motor, cognitive and language systems in early development, and how these systems develop in concert with each other. Lessons from basic research, clinical research and ongoing intervention studies will be presented to provide concrete tools for interventionists, which will then be applied to specific case examples.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List five ways that humans learn in all domains, and be able to provide examples of that learning from their practice.
• Describe the relationship between early movement and early sound and word production, with examples.
• Create a movement “centerpiece” for a language activity based on their clinical practice, using principles discussed in the course.

Seminar 14 Top 10 Skills to Teach Parents and Families

LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP, East Stroudsburg University
Emily Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP/L, Colonial IU 20

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Parents and family members are our greatest partners in facilitating strong speech and language development: they are in the best position to integrate speech and language instruction into their children’s everyday lives, increasing generalization of skills and addressing concepts in naturalistic settings. Unfortunately, many of the techniques we use are foreign to parents, who often feel overwhelmed and underqualified to employ the same strategies and activities that SLPs use in therapy sessions. SLPs may have few opportunities to meet with parents and provide training on how to facilitate speech and language skills; as such, we need to know what to teach parents to get the most “bang for our buck,” and which strategies have been supported by evidence. This presentation will provide an overview of the “Top 10” strategies to teach parents. The evidence base for each strategy will be reviewed to ensure participants have a strong foundational understanding of what works and why. In addition, practical activities to teach parents will be reviewed, enabling the SLP to have a plan in place to educate parents effectively. The role of technology and factors that influence parent involvement, including cultural factors that should be considered, will be discussed. Participants will walk away with ideas that allow them to provide efficient training that empowers parents to take an active role in building their children’s speech and language skills. Audience participation and sharing of ideas will be encouraged.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Provide an empirical rationale for the inclusion of parents and families in the therapeutic process.
• Describe the evidence base for language facilitation strategies.
• Describe activities that parents can do with children to facilitate language development.
• Describe ways to utilize technology to increase parent engagement.

10:30 am - 11:30 am

Seminar 15 International Interprofessional Education and Practice Clinic With Community Partners

Elizabeth Grillo, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University
Patricia Swasey Washington, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University
Patricia Davidson, DCN, RDN, CDE, LDN, FAND, West Chester University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

The focus of the current presentation is the design and implementation of an international interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) clinic elective with faculty and students from nutrition, speech-language pathology (SLP), occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT). We will discuss the pedagogical and curricular innovations that align education and practice in clinical settings, while engaging the community. The elective includes faculty and students from West Chester University, USA and also faculty and students from Universidad Santa Paula, Costa Rica. From Costa Rica, three faculty from SLP, PT and OT accompanied three students from each discipline to WCU in December 2019. The steps for developing IPE courses and IPP programs utilizing a model including diverse student population and disciplines that focuses on communication and team building skills for client-centered priorities and preferences for care will be discussed. Students examine the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to establish effective teamwork across health care disciplines while exploring the roles/ responsibilities of other professions, strategies that enhance collaboration, communication and team building, using the four core competencies of the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC). The course includes two days of cultural immersion in the USA while experiencing local historical sites, two days of team building with the students and faculty focusing on the IPEC four competencies, development of an IPP screening tool across the relevant professions and three days of providing services to clients and caregivers in three clinics in Chester County, Pennsylvania. Moving from IPE to IPP is crucial for students to develop critical thinking skills, the ability to integrate the knowledge and experience of other professionals to ensure a climate of shared values and an understanding of roles and responsibilities of the team for providing person-centered care. In summary, this presentation will highlight the process for developing and implementing an international IPE/IPP community program including students from nutrition, SLP, OT and PT. Presenters will discuss why this model is needed, curricular innovations and how it addresses the current and future healthcare landscape.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the international IPE/IPP model used in the elective clinic course at WCU.
• Discuss how the four core competencies of IPEC are applied in the elective clinic course at WCU.
• Demonstrate the curricular innovations used in the elective course to move from IPE to IPP in clinics with community partners.

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Seminar 16 Balancing Goals of Care Following Stroke and Neuro-Traumatic Injury

R. Brynn Jones-Rastelli, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Rehabilitation Institute
Christine Delfino, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Rehabilitation Institute
Kathryn Hetz, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Rehabilitation Institute

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Conversations surrounding patients’ and families’ goals of care are central to the work of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) across the continuum of care. Collaborative care between service lines enhances patient advocacy and education, and empowers patients and families to make decisions with a stronger understanding of a patient’s overall medical picture and potential trajectory of recovery. Patients who have suffered a recent stroke or neuro-traumatic injury present with a unique set of clinical considerations as dysphagia is frequently intertwined with cognitive alteration and an acute change in functional status. Clinical recommendations are seldom black-and-white, particularly in geriatric populations where pre-existing comorbidities may further complicate rehabilitative potential. While working under the pressure of time and resource constraints, the SLP must provide the patient and their family with comprehensive work-up and ongoing education to aid them in making informed decisions for themselves or for their loved one. Early and ongoing collaboration with multiple service lines including stroke, neurosurgery, trauma, PM&R and palliative care is essential to explore options for rehabilitation and recovery while promoting quality of life and patient autonomy. In this seminar, we will explore the medical and ethical dilemmas that often face SLPs when caring for this population of patients across the continuum of care including ICU, acute floor status and inpatient rehabilitation settings. Special emphasis will be paid to methods of increasing interdisciplinary and collaborative management of care. Case studies will be discussed, and participants are encouraged to bring their own clinical questions for discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the elements involved in performing a comprehensive patient centered diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in the care of adult patients with new neurological and neuro-traumatic injury.
• Describe the ways in which SLPs and palliative care teams may collaborate across the continuum of care to enhance patient and family education, informed decision making, and outcomes.
• Identify pathways to implementing an interdisciplinary collaboration with other service lines in the supportive treatment of adult patients who have suffered acute stroke or neuro-traumatic injury.
• Discuss how different psychosocial and cultural influences may impact a patient’s and a family’s perspective on medical decision making, as it relates to management of dysphagia.

Seminar 17 Clinical Competence: An Ongoing Process of Engagement and Self-Awareness

Amy Lustig, PhD, CCC-SLP, Salus University
Ed Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP, Accelerated Care Plus

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Speech-language pathologists who provide direct patient care are faced with multiple day-to-day challenges, and must rely on a foundation of high-quality clinical skills to obtain optimum outcomes. The scopes of practice within SLP subspecialties can be quite broad. For example, medical speech-language pathologists must address multiple and complex concerns across swallowing, cognitive-communication, and respiratory behaviors. SLPs working with pediatric populations often find themselves fielding goals that cross communication, swallowing and behavioral targets. For these providers and others, maintaining knowledge of research-based intervention evidence and clinical best practices can be quite challenging. Environmental barriers to maximizing clinical competence include time limitations, access to journal literature and options for continuing education. Additionally, clinician-specific factors that can mitigate against the development of high-quality practice skills include resistance to change, difficulty interpreting the available published evidence and ?lack of self-awareness of practice deficiencies. This presentation will focus on strategies for addressing these barriers, with a particular emphasis on how to become aware of knowledge gaps in one’s clinical practice that may not be easily recognized by the clinician. The development and utilization of best clinical practices is characterized not as a single goal or static endpoint, but as a dynamic and ongoing process across the practitioner's career.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Recognize barriers that limit self-awareness of clinical competence.
• Describe strategies for improving knowledge of and adherence to best clinical practices.
• Explain approaches to modifying clinical practice behaviors based on new or additional evidence.

Seminar 18 Memory, Sensory and Play: Feeding Groups That Enhance Interactions With Food

Cindy Herdé, MA, CCC-SLP, Nicklaus Children’s Hospital

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

The purpose of this seminar is to illustrate how sensory and memory are related and its effects on feeding in the pediatric population. We will identify ways to create food-related opportunities to alter sensory experiences positively as well as outline the curriculum and feasibility of a group-based program for children with sensory-based pediatric feeding disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain how sensory is related to memory formation, retention and retrieval.
• List minimal four strategies to create positive memories between food and sensory play.
• Integrate effective and engaging activities for implementation within a pediatric feeding group setting.

Seminar 19 Pediatric TBI: Application of Current Evidence to the Educational Setting

Angela Ciccia, PhD, CCC-SLP, Case Western Reserve University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability in children and has recently received increased attention in the media, research and clinical practice. This seminar will highlight recent advances in understanding the characteristics, recovery trajectories, assessment and treatment issues that are paramount when working with children and adolescents with TBI. Additionally, currently practice recommendations including those provided by the Center for Disease Control and Cognitive Rehabilitation recommendations of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine will be reviewed. We will focus also on the role of the SLP with this population group in the educational setting.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe important features of pediatric TBI.
• Describe recent evidence-based practice recommendations for assessment and treatment in pediatric TBI.
• Describe specific applications of current evidence-based recommendations for pediatric TBI to the educational setting.

12:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Short Course 1 Effective Evidence-Based Practice: Obtaining Strong Clinical Evidence and Overcoming Barriers

Michelle Moore, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Virginia University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

On a daily basis, speech-language pathologists make many clinical decisions regarding service entry and dismissal, service delivery models, diagnostic approaches and treatment protocols, among others. For these decisions, the clinician is required to implement evidence-based principles in order to provide the highest quality of care. Although the field of speech-language pathology has made great gains in developing the evidence base for clinical procedures and incorporating that evidence into practice, there are still knowledge gaps in what it means to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) and how to integrate research and clinical evidence with patient preferences. Moreover, focus is oftentimes directed toward obtaining current, high-quality research evidence while underplaying the importance of ensuring the clinical evidence obtained also is high caliber. These issues can be exacerbated by time constraints as well as other barriers, for example cognitive biases, that further diminish effective EBP implementation. The focus of this seminar is to solidify what the EBP approach is and then build on this foundation by providing strategies for obtaining high-quality clinical evidence to use in making informed decisions. Specifically, the seminar will include an overview of EBP, discussion on how to overcome barriers to implementing EBP and approaches for systematically obtaining clinical data using scientific method. Concepts will be illustrated using examples and case studies from school-based clinical practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the four key steps to implement evidence-based practice.
• Identify ways to overcome barriers in applying evidence-based principles to clinical practice.
• Collect clinical data systematically using scientific method.
• Describe how to utilize clinical evidence to make informed decisions.

Short Course 2 Links to Communication and Learning: Delivering Family-Centered Intervention via Telepractice

K. Todd Houston, PhD, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert AVT, The University of Akron
Michelle Parfitt, MA, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert AVEd, DePaul School for Hearing and Speech
Deborrah Johnston, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA, MA, DePaul School for Hearing and Speech
Mary Lofreso, MA, CCC-SLP, DePaul School for Hearing and Speech

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Today, an array of distance technology is available to assist early interventionists, educators, speech-language pathologists and audiologists to provide family-centered early intervention and to enhance communication development and learning in young children with hearing loss. Professionals are utilizing technology to enhance service delivery via models of telepractice. Two models of telepractice will be presented, one from the DePaul School for Hearing and Speech and another from the Telepractice and eLearning Lab at the University of Akron. This presentation will discuss innovative uses of distance technology to enhance parent engagement, increase child attention, improved learning and communication outcomes.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify current distance technology that is impacting early intervention and learning for children with hearing loss.
• Define the role of parent coaching in telepractice.
• Define the use of telepractice as a service delivery model for children with hearing loss and their families.

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Seminar 20 Assessment of Culturally Linguistically Diverse Clients: A Case Study Approach

Kimberly Edmonds, MS, CCC-SLP, Salus University
Michele Jervis-Schultz, MS, CCC-SLP, EBS United
Amanda Byrd, MS, CCC-SLP, Penn State University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

A team of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) from PSHA’s Multicultural Issues Task Force will share information about the assessment and differential diagnosis of clients from culturally linguistically diverse backgrounds. Topics such as bilingualism, ethnographic interviewing, least-biased assessment strategies and use of interpreters will be discussed using case studies from the field.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the limitations of traditional assessment methods when evaluating CLD clients.
• Describe the elements of pre-referral and conducting an ethnographic interview.
• Describe least-biased assessment strategies and resources.
• Describe considerations for differential diagnosis in CLD clients.

Seminar 21 PDPM - What We Have Learned 6 Months In!

Anne Gilbertson, MS, CCC-SLP, HCR ManorCare

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

On October 1, 2019, the new CMS Patient Driven Payment Model (PDPM) went into effect replacing the RUG-IV for Medicare A PPS billing for skilled nursing facilities. The PDPM model classifies patients into five components - PT, OT, ST, non-therapy ancillary and nursing. Clinicians have scrambled to understand how to embrace the changes within their settings while maximizing patient outcomes. This presentation will provide an overview of PDPM to assist SLPs to feel confident with their clinical care decisions as we adjust to the new payment model.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the philosophy and five components of the Patient Driven Payment Model (PDPM).
• Identify the two bundled factors used to classify patients into the SLP Casemix group.
• Define diagnosis coding relevant to the services provided by an SLP.
• Describe care delivery strategies to maximize functional outcomes.

Seminar 22 Pediatric TBI: Application of Current Evidence to the Medical Setting

Angela Ciccia, PhD, CCC-SLP, Case Western Reserve University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability in children and has recently received increased attention in the media, research and clinical practice. This seminar will highlight recent advances in understanding the characteristics, recovery trajectories, assessment and treatment issues that are paramount when working with children and adolescents with TBI. Additionally, current practice recommendations including those provided by the Center for Disease Control and Cognitive Rehabilitation recommendations of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine will be reviewed. We will focus also on the role of the SLP with this population group in the medical setting.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe important features of pediatric TBI.
• Describe recent evidence-based practice recommendations for assessment and treatment in pediatric TBI.
• Describe specific applications of current evidence-based recommendations for pediatric TBI to the medical setting.

Seminar 23 Primary Expressions K-1 Classrooms

Eileen Cirelli, MS, CCC-SLP, Allegheny Intermediate Unit
Angela Markwood, MS, CCC-SLP, Allegheny Intermediate Unit
Maria Vassilaros, MA, CCC-SLP, Allegheny Intermediate Unit

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

The Allegheny Intermediate Unit "Primary Expressions Classrooms" staff invite you to experience a 30-year program providing intensive support to eight K-1 students (per building) available in two county school districts. The conversation will be led by the SLP/classroom teacher, SLP/itinerant provider and program administrator. This seminar is presented as a 'conversation' with audience input invited throughout. The stories shared will be of a descriptive and narrative nature of classroom operations and anecdotal stories of student success over 30 years.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss Primary Expressions Classrooms.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain alternative service delivery methods for intensive speech-language support.
• Identify curriculum-based service provision in a classroom setting.
• Illustrate classroom strategies that could be applied to their practice.
• Explain therapy techniques for intensive treatment models.

4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Seminar 24 (Especially) for English Speaking Clinicians: AAC Issues for Bilingual Clients

Bruce Wisenburn, PhD, CCC-SLP, Marywood University
Ruth Wisenburn, MS, CCC-SLP, Scranton School District

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

More than 20 percent of US residents speak a language other than English at home (US Census, 2011). Individuals within this population with complex communication needs are not receiving adequate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) clinical services (Wisenburn & Crawley, 2013). Although more than half of this group speaks English (US Census, 2011), clinicians are responsible for providing AAC service not only for their English communication but also for their communication in a different language at home, regardless of whether the clinician speaks that language. Many English-speaking clinicians may not be aware of strategies for providing effective AAC service for bilingual or non-English speakers. This seminar will address strategies for providing effective service for these clients, with a particular focus on Spanish speakers. Issues include the availability of high technology AAC capabilities for languages other than English, such as speech synthesis, alphabetic characters, digitized speech, semantic compaction and word prediction for devices from a variety of major manufacturers. Low-technology strategies, such as alphabet, word and phrase boards for other languages will also be presented. Issues of cultural acceptance and consideration of dialectal differences will also be reviewed. Specific AAC alphabet, word and phrase boards in Spanish will be provided.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss various specific AAC systems, such as Dynavox, Prentke-Romich Co. and Lingraphica.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the Spanish production capabilities for three different high-tech AAC systems.
• Identify optimum AAC word layout strategies for languages other than English.
• Identify optimum socialization and basic needs phrases to implement in Spanish.

Seminar 25 Exploring PhD Training and Career Opportunities in Speech-Language Pathology

Michelle Moore, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Virginia University
Melissa Brydon, PhD, CCC-SLP, Clarion University
Heather Rusiewicz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Duquesne University
Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, Edinboro University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who hold a research doctorate provide invaluable contributions to the field of communication sciences and disorders. By applying their expertise, professionals with a PhD help prepare future clinicians for the workforce and contribute to the growth of the profession by advancing the evidence base. A decline in the number of SLPs who hold a PhD will ultimately impact the number of clinically prepared SLPs, and will inhibit the expansion of knowledge in the field of communication sciences and disorders. The doctoral shortage could also result in higher student–faculty ratios and an increased dependence on adjunct lecturers. This has the potential to negatively impact the quality of the programs by creating an academic environment that lacks a strong research base. To date, there continues to be more faculty and research positions open than individuals available to fill them, with the numbers continuing to grow each year. Among the many reasons for the shortage, lack of awareness of the multiple career tracks available to those with a PhD is one that has been cited in the literature. The purpose of this presentation is to provide reasons for pursuing a PhD and to highlight the various employment options that are available after obtaining a research doctorate in speech-language pathology or related field. This seminar will use a panel-based format to include what's generally involved in research doctoral training, how to navigate the application process, what career opportunities are available and other related topics asked by the session participants.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Compare and contrast research versus clinical doctoral training programs.
• Identify key program features to consider when applying to a PhD program.
• Describe the employment options available after obtaining a PhD.
• Describe the steps involved in applying to a doctoral program.

Seminar 26 PA Licensure Update

Amy Goldman, MS, CCC-SLP, Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Judith Pachter Schulder, JD, Attorney, Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Sandra Matter, Administrator, Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Members of the Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology will present updates related to legislation affecting licensees seeking to practice in PA (Act 41 of 2019) and other rules and regulations of interest and importance to the professions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe requirements for licensees from other states seeking PA license.
• Compare continuing education requirements among ASHA, PDE and licensure.
• Identify two issues of concern to PA licensees.

Seminar 27 Palliative Care: Not Just at the End of Life

Mamta Bhatnagar, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Palliative care is both a model of care and a specialty focusing on improving quality of life for patients and families living with serious illness. It focuses on providing patients with relief from symptoms, pain and stress of a serious illness - whatever the diagnosis. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and family. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage of a serious illness. It can be provided at the same time as treatments directed toward the primary disease with the aim to help people live as well as possible while facing illness. This presentation will provide an overview of the evidence supporting palliative care, the outcomes most commonly improved by it, what it looks like day to day for patients and go over some of the skills that palliative care practitioners use.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the difference between palliative care and hospice.
• List two outcomes consistently impacted by palliative care among oncologic patients.
• Identify two indications to consult palliative care.
• Arrange for referring a patient to palliative care.

Seminar 28 Private Practice 101: Starting and Growing Your Own Business

Jill Shook, MS, CCC-SLP, Jill Shook Therapy

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

This is for anyone who wants to start a private practice but isn't sure how to begin. It will guide you through the process of starting a practice, including how to set up your business structure here in Pennsylvania how to determine a fair rate for different types of sessions, basic marketing options and the always-important HIPAA compliance.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss GSuite by Google and Google Adwords.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List three different types of business structures for a private practice.
• Describe the process of determining a fair rate for speech therapy sessions.
• Define the term HIPAA, and list three ways to comply with the regulations.
• Describe three different marketing options for a private practice.

Seminar 29 University Forum

Robert Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, FNAP, Salus University
Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (PSHA) University Forum invites members of undergraduate and graduate programs, department chairs, program and clinical directors, teaching faculty and clinical supervisors, to share their collective knowledge and skills in a guided discussion, to enhance the didactic and clinical education of all students in programs of communication sciences and disorders throughout the Commonwealth. Topics to be addressed include interprofessional education, clinical supervision, reimbursement and legislation changes, teaching strategies and accreditation and administrative challenges and successes. Moderated by members of the PSHA Executive Board, aims of this seminar are to spark conversations and foster collaborations, to facilitate the growth of higher education in communication sciences and disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify strategies for infusing didactic and clinical education in communication sciences and disorders programs.
• Illustrate successful integration of interprofessional education into communication sciences and disorders programs.
• Illustrate approaches to address administrative and legislative changes in higher education that impact communication sciences and disorders programs.

FRIDAY, APRIL 3

8:30 am - 9:30 am

Seminar 30 Dysphagia, Aspiration and Pneumonia: An Otolaryngologist’s Perspective on the Patients We Treat

Jonas Johnson, MD, University of Pittsburgh

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Pneumonia has been characterized as “the old man’s friend” because it is the final common pathway for many terminal diseases. This perspective, while cynic, deserves further inspection. As providers of contemporary medicine, we strive to understand the physiology of disease. Only through understanding of the underlying process can we hope to be effective in our therapies. In this presentation, several of the diseases frequently associated with dysphagia, aspiration and pneumonia will be discussed. Entities considered will be neurologic impairment, head and neck surgery as well as head and neck irradiation and major thoracoabdominal surgery diagnostic strategy as well as potential therapies will be discussed in the context of these diseases. The decision to recommend an oral diet remains an exercise of risk assessment in some patients. The risk of recommending nothing by mouth must be weighed against the potential benefit of some oral intake. Surgical effort at aspiration control such as tracheotomy, gastric tube feeding and aerodigestive separation will be discussed. Provision of care to patient with active aspiration is best undertaken with the involvement of a multidisciplinary team. The partnership between speech-language pathology, nursing, physical therapy, oral health and physicians is essential.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify methods to confirm the diagnosis.
• Define implementation of therapy.
• Identify when to ask for surgical intervention.

This seminar is co-sponsored with the Northeastern Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Pennsylvania (NESHAP)

Seminar 31 Interprofessional Practice in Educational Settings Between Speech-Language Pathology and Physical Education

Amy Shannonhouse, PhD, CCC-SLP, Clarion University
Mary Pat McCarthy, PhD, CCC-SLP, Clarion University
Elizabeth Shannonhouse, MS, CCC-SLP, Albuquerque School District

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

This seminar will introduce speech-language pathologists to a creative and collaborative way of integrating gross motor skills and literacy instruction. Most American children do not meet the daily-required structured and unstructured amounts of physical activity, despite the research that shows a strong correlation between physical activity and brain development. (Milne, Cacciotti, Davies, Orr, et al. (2018), (Trudeau & Shephard, 2010). Other benefits of physical activity are attention and focus, self-regulation and better behaviors, and overall mental and physical health benefits. (https://health.gov/paguidelines/second-edition/pdf/Physical_Activity_Guidelines_2nd_edition.pdf), (Tomporowski (2003). Participants will actively learn and practice teaching cues of fundamental motor skills while engaging in reading children’s books. Techniques can be adapted for infants to primary age children. Suggested activities and books from Book in Motion by Julie Dietzel-Glair and books chosen by the presenters will be shared. This seminar provides the opportunity for active participation and creative development of fundamental motor skills that align with quality children’s literature. Participants will be provided a handout with teaching cues for fundamental motor skills and explanation of the developmental continuum. Examples of age-appropriate children’s literature/books for each age level will be provided during the seminar. At the conclusion, participants will have the opportunity to share strategies that they currently use to integrate physical activity and literacy. Additionally, they will reflect on the strategies presented through books, and share in small groups how they can implement these strategies into their own therapy sessions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify strategies for integrating reading, movement and fundamental motor skills.
• Discuss and demonstrate how to enhance their speech-language therapy as related to reading skills, by building on the kinesthetic intelligence of young learners, and to differentiate instruction by implementing the Books in Motion.
• Discuss and demonstrate teaching cues for fundamental motor skill movements utilizing the fundamental motor skill stages of the developmental continuum.

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Seminar 32 Telepractice: The Practical Side of Service Provision at a Distance

William Connors, MA, CCC-SLP, Aphaisa Toolbox

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Telepractice, the delivery of services at a distance, represents a growing opportunity for speech-language pathology, audiology and rehab services in general. This seminar, appropriate for all levels, will demonstrate the basics of conducting a session online and will discuss the business aspects of starting a telepractice with a focus on optimizing technology and video platforms. The important legal, professional, job opportunity and ethical issues related to telepractice will be updated.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify 10 essential features of an SLPcentric video platform for telepractice.
• Identify six resources for adding telepractice to a company, an organization or a graduate curriculum.
• Identify six resources for staying abreast of legal and professional issues related to telepractice.
• Identify five ways to utilize resources on a telepractice platform.

8:30 am - 12:00 pm

Short Course 3 Communication Disorders Associated With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

Margaret Blake, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Houston

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Damage to the right cerebral hemisphere can affect a variety of communication functions including production and comprehension of prosody and discourse, pragmatics, theory of mind and interpretation of intended meaning. Characteristics of the resulting deficits will be discussed along with best practices for assessment and treatment given the limited evidence available to this specific population.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify two resources for assessment of pragmatics.
• Describe how theory of mind deficits can impact language use.
• Describe two theoretically based treatments for language and pragmatic deficits.

This short course is co-sponsored with the Northeastern Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Pennsylvania (NESHAP)

Short Course 4 Multidisciplinary Management of Orofacial Clefts - What Should You Know?

Matthew Ford, MS, CCC-SLP, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh
Katherine Katko, MS, CCC-SLP, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

This presentation will cover the prevalence, cleft types, causes, genetic factors and multidisciplinary interventions. Multidisciplinary management of cleft from diagnosis until treatment completion at skeletal maturity will be reviewed. The importance of the interdisciplinary team will be emphasized. Specific focus on early feeding and swallowing management and interventions as well as speech and language interventions will be emphasized. The impact of structural difference on speech production will be illustrated and appropriate treatment modalities will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify variability in cleft type.
• Define the need for multidisciplinary interventions for children with orofacial clefts.
• Describe feeding and swallowing challenges in children with orofacial clefts.
• Identify evidence-based practice intervention techniques for children with orofacial clefts.

Short Course 5 Rethinking School-Age Language Assessment Sue Grogan-Johnson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Kent State University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

In this short course, we will consider the role of the SLP in determining language disability and the characteristics of a child’s language impairment. Topics covered include: clinical markers of language impairment, recent research on how to decide if we are using a “good” test, how to better quantify our observations of language functioning and the role of criterion referenced assessments. The goal of this short course is to critically evaluate our assessment methods to improve our school-based practice. Participants will also be provided with free or low-cost online assessment tools.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Utilize three criteria to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a language test.
• Identify two new criterion referenced tests of language functioning.
• Analyze how to synthesize test results to determine and characterize language disability.

9:45 am - 10:45 am

Seminar 33 Complex Decisions in Terminal Illness: Perspectives From the Other Side

Helga McCullough, EdD, Lebanon Valley College
Michelle Scesa, EdD, Lebanon Valley College

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

ALS is a devastating diagnosis. It can be even more devastating when you are well-versed in the progression and outcome. The disease is uniformly fatal and mean life expectancy is three years from the onset of symptoms.The authors of this proposal are both speech-language pathologists who recently had close family members (mother and father-in-law) diagnosed with and pass away from ALS. The diagnosis of close family members gave the authors a first-hand look into what it is like to face the complex issues and decisions that surround terminal illness. Coming to terms with the diagnosis can take a significant amount of time, which may interfere with the patient’s and family’s ability to focus on decisions pertaining to potential interventions. While the decision-making process and outcomes will be different for each patient and family, there are many issues to be considered along the way. Patients and family members will likely want to consider factors such as perceived quality of life; the prolongation of life; the physical need of the proposed intervention; the practicality of the proposed intervention; the proposed intervention as being an indicator of significant decline; and patient’s and family’s previous experiences, knowledge and beliefs. The decision-making model developed by Hogden, Greenfield, Nugus, and Kieran (2013) will be discussed. Perceived quality of life will be a key talking point in this presentation. The presenters will also provide tips and strategies for speech-language pathologists to facilitate the provision of patient-centered care in these tough, terminal situations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify potential complex decisions surrounding terminal illness.
• Identify differences in views/wishes pertaining to terminal illness management.
• Describe how to respect patients' wishes while involved in the care of patients with terminal illness.

Seminar 34 Homogeneous or Heterogeneous-What to Do? Clinical Supervision for Groups

Robert Skwarecki, PhD, CCC-SLP, California University of Pennsylvania
Denise Jozwick-Joseph, PhD, CCC-SLP, California University of Pennsylvania

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Preparing graduate student clinicians to work with a variety of clients in a diverse number of settings places a challenging responsibility on clinical supervisors. As the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists widens and caseloads increase, clinicians need to be prepared to work with groups. Often, new clinicians have a difficult time transitioning from the one-to-one model to groups with three or four children or adults with differing goals and objectives. Such students frequently rotate through each individual in a group, approaching the therapy activities as more of a segmented session than an interactive whole. To facilitate student professional growth, the supervisor must take on the challenging task of ensuring that the student clinicians develop the skills necessary to integrate multiple objectives and to involve all the members of the group throughout the session. This seminar will examine how supervisors can provide students with strategies for group intervention that prepare students to successfully plan an integrated therapy session versus using a 1:1 model client approach within a group. Differing supervisory intervention strategies and approaches will be reviewed along with considerations and highlights from varying models that facilitate supervision of graduate students for group sessions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe approaches for preparing graduate student clinicians for effective client treatment in group settings.
• Explain the differences in student clinician supervision needs/approaches for group vs individual sessions.
• Describe the differences in supervision approaches for adult vs. child group sessions.

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Seminar 35 Secondary Transition and SLPs: Speaking Up for the Future

Hillary Mangis, PhD, PaTTAN
Jennifer Geibel, EdD, CCC-SLP, PaTTAN

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Secondary transition is the process of preparing students for life after they leave high school, including participation in post-secondary education or training, employment and community living. These three areas are often referred to as “post-secondary outcomes” and are the driving force behind Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) written for students in high school. The planning process is a collaborative effort between the student, family/caregiver, school team and agency partners. Because speech-language pathologists may serve in various capacities on the IEP team and during the secondary transition process – case manager, teacher, related service provider, consultant – it is important that SLPs understand the secondary transition process, as well as Pennsylvania’s career education and work standards. In this seminar, participants will increase their knowledge of the secondary transition process and the Career Readiness Indicator. They will also discuss the development of IEPs that meet transition requirements by including coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals that will reasonably enable students to meet post-secondary outcomes. Furthermore, participants will explore the Career Education and Work Standards and note the many ways in which effective communication is reflected in the standards, underlining the importance of strong receptive and expressive language skills within post-secondary environments.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify three aspects of successful secondary transition planning.
• Formulate two coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals that will reasonably enable students to meet post-secondary outcomes.
• Describe three possible speech-language intervention activities for high school students that can promote the development of necessary workplace communication skills.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Seminar 36 Gamification as a Tool for Improved Treatment Outcomes in SLP

Susana Keller, CScD, CCC-SLP, Moravian College
Kara Cotter, BS, Moravian College

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Behavior modification is a fundamental construct underpinning interventions in many clinical disciplines including speech-language pathology. Behavior modification theory drives much of the treatment we provide on a daily basis. Understanding the benefits and limitations of these interventions is important for optimizing therapy. Gamification (inserting game design elements into non-game contexts) can be looked at as an innovative tool within the behavioral modification framework. Kapp explains gamification as “using game-based mechanics, aesthetics and game thinking to engage people, motivate action, promote learning and solve problems”. Put more simply, gamification is inserting game design elements, such as points and levels, into non-game contexts (Deterding, Dixon, Kahled, Nacke, 2011). Although popular in many areas, gamification is taking the education field by storm (Kapp, 2012). For example, Banfield and Wilkerson (2014) found that the gamification in the classroom greatly improved student intrinsic motivation, with 92.2 percent of students from the gamified section of class reporting intrinsic motivation themes, as opposed to 30.5 percent in the traditional classroom. These findings suggest that gamification could significantly increase the motivation critical for patients to succeed while being treated for communication and swallowing disorders. Application of gamification principles to treatments used by speech-language pathologists may help patients achieve their treatment goals and, as importantly, help them sustain these gains. By capitalizing the elements that motivate individuals, real and sustainable change may occur.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define behavior modification in a therapy context.
• Identify benefits and limitations of behavior modification as a tool for therapy.
• Define gamification and discuss how gamification fits within the behavior modification construct.
• Illustrate how gamification can be used to enhance treatment outcomes.

Seminar 37 Voice Education and Injury Prevention in Young Performers

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University
Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University
Tia Spagnuolo, MS, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University
Brianna Spilsbury, BS, Misericordia University
Chantal Whiteduck, BS, Misericordia University
Anna Hershey, BS, Misericordia University
Madison Shelley, Misericordia University
Megan Florio, Misericordia University
Molly Clemson, Misericordia University
Rickson Mesquita, PhD, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas Brazil
Sergio Novi, MS, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas Brazil

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Contemporary motor learning literature states that optimal performance is reached when individuals are able to transfer between automatic performance and conscious awareness of bodily movements. A voice therapy approach that incorporates these new concepts in motor learning involves implicit and explicit instruction, symbolic representation of the motor act, motor imagery and action observation to teach and reinforce learning. Integrating these principles to accommodate all learning styles and helping individuals achieve conscious control of performance will help to improve retention of the learned skill and decrease the probability of vocal injury. A non-linear model grounded in these concepts has been applied to voice training in young performers ages seven to 17 in Dallas, Pennsylvania. If young performers can be taught at an early age the biomechanics of voice production, then the incidence of voice issues that may result in voice disorders can be reduced. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging device that the Misericordia University Voice Science Laboratory uses to identify neural connections and pathways involved in learning. Forthcoming research using functional connectivity analysis will examine how young performers learn how to produce a novel voice skill. Results are expected to show that individuals who receive this voice training approach will demonstrate more neural pathways and connections during the learning phase compared to those who receive implicit-only instruction. This presentation will help speech-language pathologists gain a better understanding of different methods of voice training and how they apply to training young performers.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain traditional motor learning theories related to voice training.
• Explain the new concepts in motor learning related to voice training.
• Describe the application of contemporary motor learning concepts and how they are used to train young performers.

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Seminar 38 Integrating Manual Mimicry Gesture Cues in the Management of Speech Production Objectives

Heather Rusiewicz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Duquesne University
Caron Daley, PhD, Duquesne University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Individuals frequently use their hands to provide cues in the treatment of speech sound disorders (SSDs). Yet, the use of such gestural cues is most often motivated by clinical experience and intuition, but is not usually theoretically motivated or empirically studied. This presentation will focus specifically on the use of manual gesture cues that are spatiotemporally analogous to the target speech sounds (i.e., manual mimicry cues). One example of a manual mimicry cue is releasing one’s fingers from a fist outward to mimic the place, manner and timing of /p/. The use of movement and hand gestures in related disciplines, like music and vocal pedagogy will be highlighted. Following this presentation, participants will better understand the rationale, clinical application and limited research currently available on a multisensory approach for speech intervention that systematically integrates manual mimicry cues. There are several aims of this presentation. First, a theoretical framework will be provided to support the use of gestural cues in the treatment of speech production objectives. Next, descriptions, illustrations and case examples of the use of manual mimicry cues will be provided for both speech therapy and singing related objectives. Then, preliminary data from studies of manual mimicry gestures in speech therapy and vocal pedagogy will be discussed. Finally, participants will be given the opportunity to create and practice manual mimicry cues as relevant for their clients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the theoretical motivation for using manual mimicry gesture cues in the management of speech sound targets.
• Identify at least four speech targets that may integrate manual mimicry gesture cues.
• Formulate manual mimicry cues for both segmental and suprasegmental objectives.

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Seminar 39 FEES: The Superior View

Rita Freydel McMahon, MS, CCC-SLP, Carolina FEES

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

FEES: The Superior View will provide the learner with information on fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) including competency guidelines, potential complications and overall patient comfort. Research comparing FEES to the modified barium swallow study (MBSS) will be reviewed and video examples of identifying abnormalities using FEES are included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Assess the benefits and challenges of FEES.
• Describe the fundamental differences between FEES and MBSS.
• List structures observed via the endoscopic view.
• Describe salient findings observed with FEES.

Seminar 40 The Ins, Outs, Ups and Downs of Private Practice

Elizabeth Gilbert, MA, CCC-SLP, Therapy Works LLC

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Running a private practice is an appealing but intimidating idea for many therapists. Most professionals looking to start a practice are therapists themselves and understanding the ins and outs of running a business is daunting. In this seminar practitioners will gain a realistic perspective on how to operate a successful private practice, listening to expert advice on the ups and downs of delivering the best service possible. Attendees will leave with an understanding of the basic requirements needed to start and run their practice with special consideration given to marketing themselves and finding their niche in an ever-growing community of therapists.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Show the preliminary requirements for starting a private practice and the resources available to help small business owners in PA.
• Analyze the pros and cons to starting and running a private practice.
• Apply how to develop and market their niche.

1:00 pm - 4:15 pm

Short Course 6 Cognitive Disorders Associated With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

Margaret Blake, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Houston

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Damage to the right cerebral hemisphere can affect a variety of cognitive functions including attention, executive function, awareness and memory. Characteristics of the commonly observed deficits will be addressed along with suggested practices for assessment and evidence-based practice for treatment. Specific deficits to be covered include unilateral neglect, anosognosia (reduced awareness) and executive function deficits.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify three types of unilateral neglect.
• Describe metacognitive strategy training for disorders of attention and executive function.
• List five factors that impact a client's awareness of deficits.

Short Course 7 Rethinking School-Age Language Intervention: SLP Input, Statistical Learning and Working Memory

Sue Grogan-Johnson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Kent State University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

During this short course, we will review some of the new research related to SLP input during language intervention, the influence of metalinguistics on intervention and applying the principals of statistical learning (highlighting the language pattern you want the student to learn). We will discuss how to implement these concepts into our daily practice and create an intervention material based on the information that we learn. Please bring one or two narrative books that you utilize in intervention to this short course (e.g., Room on the Broom, The Guffalo, Goosebumps, or a story that is utilized in the classroom).

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify features of statistical learning as it applies to language intervention.
• Critically interpret SLP input and therapy procedures for language intervention.
• Complete a language intervention activity based on newly learned principles of SLP input, metalinguistics and statistical learning.

Short Course 8 The Ripple Effect of Stuttering: A Community-Based Approach

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Edinboro University
Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, Edinboro University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

The stuttering experience has a ripple effect that extends far beyond the child who stutters. Parents, teachers, peers and others must possess knowledge and skills to best support children who stutter. This presentation will highlight new clinical tools and resources to provide a community-based treatment approach for childhood onset stuttering. Specifically, clinical assessments designed for parents and teachers as well as a new educational program about stuttering will be introduced.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss the InterACT program and the Community Centered Stuttering Assesments.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe current assessment and treatment procedures for the surface-level and affective components of childhood onset stuttering.
• Assess new clinical resources to improve peer knowledge about stuttering.
• Assess new assessment instruments for parents and teachers.

2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Seminar 41 Assistive Technology Tools to Support Story Telling

Priscilla Danielson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Linguistic Solutions, LLC
Ole Danielson, BA, Linguistic Solutions, LLC

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

This presentation will demonstrate and discuss a targeted set of technology tools that support story telling within the scope of speech-language therapy. Story telling is a multi-functional strategy that facilitates literacy, organization, syntax, semantics, event sequencing, written language, sound production, auditory processing, carry-over of trained skills and home/school connections. Story telling also reinforces the individual's sense of creativity and supports student engagement with a focus on personal interests and control within the therapy setting. Reviewing a selection of applications and apps that foster story telling. This presentation will make connections between the tools used in the story creation process and varied speech-language therapy targets. Tools discussed will have relatively short learning curves and a range of costs to increase accessibility for therapists. The presenters will highlight features and settings of the apps/applications to allow therapists to make more discriminative choices of tools. Time will be provided for hands-on exploration of several of the tools discussed and participants can contribute to the conversation with recommendations of tools they have used during the therapy process. The presenters will share a Google form organizing a variety of story telling tools by features, platform availability and cost.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define the characteristics of strong story-telling within the therapy process.
• Identify at least five story telling tools that support speech-language therapy targets.
• Identify the features of story telling tools that support therapist and student accessibility.
• Identify features of technology tools that translate easily to the therapy process.

2:45 pm - 4:15 pm

Seminar 42 Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Honing Assessment and Treatment Skills

Patricia Mayro, MA, CCC-SLP, Salus University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Finding and integrating the latest research evidence into intervention practices can be challenging for busy speech-language pathologists (SLPs). This presentation will address the most current information about childhood apraxia of speech and provide strategies for making a differential diagnosis. We will also review which treatment approach is recommended depending on the profile of the child’s motor speech abilities. We will review principles of motor learning as the basis for treating CAS.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define childhood apraxia of speech (CAS).
• Describe differential diagnostic criteria for CAS.
• Identify two treatment methods for CAS that have supporting evidence for clinical use.

Seminar 43 Grand Rounds Across the Miles: An Across-the-State Experience

Viki Hedderick, RN, DEd, Edinboro University
Pamela Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP, Bloomsburg University
Pamela Cook, PhD (C), CNS, RN, Bloomsburg University
Andy Dunlap, LSW, PhD, Bloomsburg University
Rebecca Toothaker, PhD, RN, Bloomsburg University
Kiarash Aramesh, MD, PhD, Edinboro University
Kate Krival, PhD, CCC-SLP, Edinboro University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Interprofessional Practice IPP) are now accreditation requirements for many national agencies. Such collaboration takes time, resources and cooperation across multiple organizational levels. It requires the “blurring” of some boundaries in education and practice. The blurring of boundaries can – and should - occur across our university walls. A spirit of collaboration improves our academic experience whereby programs may work together, sharing knowledge, innovation and resources. This can occur within and across disciplines, and the conduction of IPE activities across the commonwealth may serve multiple purposes. First, it allows students from more than one institution to benefit from the expertise of faculty and staff at another institution. Second, it permits students from sister programs to interact in a clinically based collaborative fashion, validating their knowledge and skills as they prepare to enter practice. Third, it fosters a mind frame where colleagues across the state are viewed as partners in clinical education, regardless of profession and regardless of city. Toward this end, Edinboro University invited Bloomsburg University to participate in a set of cross-state IPE activities via Zoom technology. A case study, embedded with elements unique to each discipline, is presented using a grand rounds format. Camaraderie develops over the shared goal of providing high quality care. Participants learned important details of the different roles of different professions when working on the case study. This program provides an innovative way to meet national accreditation requirements but also instill the spirit of cooperation both across and within our universities.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss Zoom web conferencing.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe three challenges in implementing interprofessional programming activities.
• Describe the use of web conferencing technology in conducting interprofessional activities.
• Assess challenges and solutions using online distance education formats for interprofessional activities.
• List three benefits of multi-university cooperation in professional preparation.

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Seminar 44 A Toolbox for Speech-Language Pathology Supervisors and Students

Carol Walck, MS, CCC-SLP, Carol Walck & Associates

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

The field of speech-language pathology requires and benefits from ongoing learning, collaboration and mentoring within our field. The supervision of students is beneficial to both the supervisor and those being supervised as it enables the sharing of experiences, perspectives and knowledge. It is crucial to identify the experiences, knowledge base, strengths and professional interests of the student in order to effectively teach and challenge them to develop into a knowledgeable, problem-based learner as they enter the field. This presentation will provide students and practicing speech-language pathologists (SLPs) strategies for assessment prior to and throughout a mentoring relationship that will be beneficial to both. Suggestions for the interview process along with recommendations for expectations, projects and self-reflection will be presented.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify interview strategies to assess experiences, knowledge base, strengths and interests of the student.
• Identify a framework of expectations for supervising students.
• Develop strategies for student self-reflection.
• Develop problem-based learning opportunities.

4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Technical Session 1 Your Voice is Your Business: Science and Art of Communication

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University
Orlando Barone, MA, The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania
Brianna Spilsbury, BS, Misericordia University
Chantal Whiteduck, BS, Misericordia University
Anna Hershey, BS, Misericordia University
Madison Shelley, Misericordia University
Megan Florio, Misericordia University
Molly Clemson, Misericordia University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Traditionally, there has been a disconnect between the art of speaking effectively and the science behind vocal production. For speech-language pathologists to be effective communicators when speaking with colleagues, clients and caregivers, they must understand the fundamentals of effective communication. Clinicians would benefit from understanding the anatomy and physiology behind their voices and how they can make vocal choices to communicate more effectively. Barone and Tellis (2016) created a comprehensive approach of instructing individuals on the vocal science and interpersonal effectiveness skills needed to be a successful speaker and clinician. This approach merges the knowledge and techniques from the voice science world the training and development world, and the performance world to connect the technically based aspects of voice production with an applied, skill-based grasp of interpersonal effectiveness. This integrated approach for effective speaking is used at Misericordia University, as well as in leadership coaching sessions at The Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University to teach graduate student clinicians and MBA students how to become successful communicators. The approach provides clinicians with knowledge about vocal mechanics, allowing them to understand the anatomy and physiology behind the voice and how to properly care for it. This approach also teaches clinicians the power of intentional communication through instruction on the use of posture, facial expression and gestures. Applying voice science and interpersonal effectiveness to clinical situations allows clinicians to communicate at their highest levels and use purposeful communication to provide clear messages to their clients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the fundamentals of interpersonal effectiveness skills and voice to speech-language pathology.
• Describe the scientific aspects behind production of voice.
• Discuss the importance of interpersonal effectiveness skills and voice to the field of speech-language pathology.

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Seminar 45 How to Incorporate Growth Mindset Into Speech Therapy

Emily Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP/L, Colonial IU 20

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

The term, “growth mindset,” has been a recent buzzword in the education world. It refers to a philosophy of continuously developing abilities through persistence and hard work, rather than relying on preconceived notions of “fixed” skill levels to define expectations of student achievement. Instead of focusing on outcomes, growth mindset focuses on the process of learning and building resilience. Though many professionals have a basic understanding of what a growth mindset consists of, implementing these concepts into everyday instruction and classroom culture can be a challenge. Speech-language pathologists are in unique situations to cultivate and see benefits from a growth mindset - we continuously work with students in environments where they are challenged and face difficulties and must employ resilience and frustration tolerance strategies. Intentionally teaching and modeling growth mindset concepts is beneficial to our students’ self-concepts, problem-solving abilities, motivation and development. This presentation will define and describe the specifics of growth mindset. It will review current research on how growth mindset has been useful in teaching and learning contexts and will focus on real-world applications of growth mindset within the field of speech pathology. This includes: how to set up the physical space to facilitate growth mindset, examples of language to use, activities to teach students about growth mindset and resources for professionals to use and adapt to their own settings. Participants will be challenged to review scenarios and make recommendations to improve the integration of growth mindset concepts, with time reserved at the end for specific questions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define and describe what a “growth mindset” consists of, compared to a fixed mindset.
• Identify language, including language used in directions and feedback, that facilitates growth mindset.
• List specific activities that can be used to teach students about growth mindset.

Seminar 46 Life is Service: Leadership, Engagement and Advocacy in Pennsylvania

Robert Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, FNAP, Salus University
Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

This session outlines common skills possessed by effective leaders and addresses the development of professional leadership skills and strategies for SLPs and AuDs. The presenters discuss advocacy and membership engagement strategies as academic program and state professional organization leaders. Session participants will leave with concrete ideas to advocate for positive changes in their profession at local, state and national levels.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify at least five effective leadership skills.
• Define their own leadership skills and strategies.
• Integrate an action plan to advocate for positive change in their professional setting.

Seminar 47 SLP Intervention in the Acute Stroke Population

Kathryn Krobot, MA, CCC-SLP, UPMC Presbyterian Hospital

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

The goal of this presentation is to discuss evaluation of speech, language, cognitive and swallowing disorders in a JCAHO Stroke Comprehensive Center. Discussion will include risk factors for swallowing disorders, instrumental swallowing assessments and treatment of swallowing disorders. In terms of speech, language and cognition, multiple screening tools and their use in the acute care setting will be reviewed. Following the review of tools, a QI project will be presented detailing the tools chosen for various stroke patients. The seminar will conclude with a few case presentations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Analyze the process for evaluating speech, language and swallowing in an acute stroke patient.
• Identify indicators that a stroke patient may need further speech, language or swallowing assessment.
• Apply the impact of diagnostic procedures on evaluation methods in the acute stroke population.
• Identify standardized assessments used in speech, language and cognitive disorders.

Seminar 48 Strategies for Effective Data Collection: Why Less is More

Kristin Bowers, MA, CCC-SLP, Pittsburgh Mt. Oliver IU#2

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

With the current demands placed on many SLPs for reports, progress monitoring and related reporting, data collection can turn into something that is at odds with therapy, rather than something that effectively measures progress while driving therapy. This seminar first examines drawbacks to commonly used data-collection techniques and mindsets, then presents alternative methods that relieve the conflict between great data and great therapy. This presentation seeks to provide SLPs with strategies to collect data without being constrained by it.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify internal and external factors influencing the need for data.
• Identify aspects of, and potential conflicts between, good therapy and good data.
• Identify key components of the two different data-collection methods that are presented.

4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

Seminar 49 Easier EBP: Save Time and Money While Finding Good Research

Jill Shook, MS, CCC-SLP, Jill Shook Therapy

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

No more research overwhelm! Learn free and inexpensive methods to access good research in our field. Includes practical solutions that participants can use immediately, along with a guided walkthrough of selected resources by topic and a brainstorming session so participants can develop a plan to access research that is relevant to their specific needs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define the PICO framework and demonstrate how to use it in clinical practice.
• Describe one non-ASHA website that is useful for finding research for a specific topic related to their clinical practice.
• List three ASHA pages and/or resources that support finding research in evidence-based practice.
• List three barriers to finding research within our field currently.

5:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Technical Session 2 Perspectives on Assessment and Treatment of PVFMD

Chantal Whiteduck, BS, Misericordia University
Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University
Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University
Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD) has been described as a disorder that results from adduction of the vocal folds during inhalation or exhalation that has an impact on typical breathing (Mathers-Schmidt, 2001; Murry, Tabaee, & Aviv, 2004; Gallena & Kerins, 2013; Patel et. al, 2015; Gallena, Johnson, & Vossoughi, 2019). This disorder is very complex because it has no known etiology and is often misdiagnosed. This misdiagnosis is likely due to the minimal research surrounding PVFMD, resulting in improper treatment and misconceptions surrounding the disorder. There is some agreement in the literature across various disciplines that see patients with PVFMD; however, it is referred by various different names (e.g., chronic cough, vocal cord dysfunction) criteria for diagnosis and recommendation for treatment protocols. This inconsistency attests to the divide in the literature for methods recommended for the assessment, treatment and diagnosis of PVFMD. It is therefore imperative to investigate professionals' understanding of PVFMD, what treatment methods these professionals are using in their clinical practice, how the clinicians and physicians are using the strategies they implement and their determination of clinical success of existing intervention strategies. This presentation aims to help speech-language pathologists understand current assessment and intervention strategies in the literature across various different disciplines that work with clients with PVFMD.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss the various disciplines who treat clients with PVFMD.
• Discuss the literature available for the assessment and treatment of PVFMD.
• Explain the assessment and treatment interventions currently recommended for clients with PVFMD.

SATURDAY, APRIL 4

8:00 am - 8:30 am

Technical Session 3 Promoting Interprofessional Collaboration Through an Undergraduate Service-Learning Project

Dana Bitetti, PhD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University
Laurie Colborn, EdD, La Salle University
Tara Carr-Lemke, MA, La Salle University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

As future members of interprofessional teams, students in communication sciences and disorders can be introduced to the importance of interprofessional practice and be provided with interprofessional experiences in their undergraduate coursework. This will allow students to build upon this foundational knowledge for graduate coursework and beyond. This presentation will discuss how a language development course with a service-learning component promoted interprofessional collaboration between undergraduate students in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and the La Salle Neighborhood Nursing Center. Through group collaboration, the students created an informational handout that the nursing center staff is now providing to parents who visit the center. This service-learning project was designed to meet specific course learning objectives while also meeting the Nursing Center’s need to provide parents with culturally appropriate, easy-to-read information about how to support the language and literacy development of their young children and recognize the warning signs of a language disorder. Strategies for designing service learning coursework with an interprofessional focus will be discussed (e.g., student collaboration, collaboration with the center). We will also discuss strategies for assessing student learning outcomes related to their knowledge of interprofessional collaboration, their knowledge of course content and their understanding of the needs of the surrounding community.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain the importance of Interprofessional Education (IPE) in undergraduate coursework.
• Explain the opportunities that this Service Learning/IPE collaborative course project presented.
• Explain the challenges that this Service Learning/IPE collaborative course project presented.
• Describe methods for assessing student learning outcomes in a service-learning course.

8:00 am - 9:30 am

Seminar 50 Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion: What is All the Fuss About?

Kelly Knollman-Porter, PhD, CCC-SLP, Miami University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Children and adults across the lifespan may experience a mTBI/concussion that impacts cognitive linguistic functioning and, in turn, negatively influences performance during required social, academic and/or work activities. Speech-language pathologists have the necessary skills in diagnostic and treatment methods which make them a valuable contributor to the post-injury multidisciplinary management team in schools, medical facilities and clinics. Therefore, understanding the nature of mTBI/concussion along with factors that can positively or negatively influence recovery is of importance. During this presentation, we will discuss the neurophysiology of mTBI/concussion, use current research and case examples to illustrate factors influencing recovery and show the benefits of a multidisciplinary management team which includes speech-language pathology.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the neurophysiology of mTBI/concussion and the neurobehavioral and neurocognitive symptoms often experienced post-injury.
• Identify key factors that can prolong recovery time post-mTBI/concussion.
• Describe trends in male and female recovery patterns.
• Discuss the benefits of a team approach to mTBI/concussion management and the key professional involved including speech-language pathology.

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Seminar 51 Ethics Clarifying Thorny Issues: Medical Code Status and When the Person has Aphasia

Paula Leslie, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Lancashire, UK
Jolene Lawton, CScD, CCC-SLP
Roberta Gillespie, PA, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

We will discuss the ethics of decision making and complex situations speech-language pathologists concerns regarding medical code status influencing recommendations, and assessing capacity when a person has aphasia. We will review the medical, ethical and legal implications from an interprofessional perspective leading to the evolution of better clinical decision making and patient care.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss the requirements for informed consent/refusal in health care.
• Identify whose role it is to determine code status.
• Define the SLP’s role in the care team when determining decision-making capacity in people with aphasia.

8:30 am - 9:00 am

Technical Session 4 Investigating Implications of AAC Display Design for Individuals With ASD

Allison Barwise, MS, CCC-SLP, Penn State University
Savanna Brittlebank, BS, Penn State University
Krista Wilkinson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Penn State University
Janice Light, PhD, CCC-SLP, Penn State University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

This study used research-based eye-tracking technology to better understand how individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) interact with AAC displays. Participants were presented with an AAC display containing a main visual scene display (VSD) and a navigation bar with thumbnail sized targets. They were instructed to touch a target item within the navigation bar, (e.g., “touch the kids with the ball”). The navigation bar was presented in four locations (i.e., top, bottom, left, right) in order to investigate the potential impact of bar location on visual attention and selection. Results and clinical implications for AAC display design for individuals with ASD are discussed.

Product Disclosure: This presentation will discuss our research using a Tobii eye-tracking research technology. However, we are not associated with them or have any financial interest with the company.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the major elements of the study design.
• Describe key results.
• Identify possible implications for practice.

9:00 am - 9:30 am

Technical Session 5 Neural Structure and Function in Autism: Implications for Learning Language

Kelly Coburn, MA, CCC-SLP, Penn State, University
Diane Williams, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, Penn State University

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Neurodevelopmental processes that begin during gestation and continue throughout childhood typically lead to spoken language. Improved models of language in the brain can help us to understand typical development, as well as the disruptions to language that occur in developmental conditions like autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Typical pre- and post-natal brain development are discussed in relation to the known neurodevelopmental differences that occur in ASD. Evidence from structural and functional MRI, DTI and EEG are summarized. Structural differences include altered patterns of cortical growth and myelination. Functional differences occur at all levels of the brain, from lateralization of functions in the cortex to the rhythmic activations of single neurons. Neuronal oscillations in particular could help explain disrupted language development by elucidating the timing differences in autistic brains that contribute to reduced functional connectivity, complex information processing and speech parsing. Findings related to implicit statistical learning, explicit learning of behavioral tasks, multisensory integration and reinforcement in ASD are also discussed. Implications of known neural differences are extended to language instruction and clinical intervention for children with ASD at early stages of language learning. Recommendations include: the use of short, simple utterances; repetition of syntactic structures without over-repetition of specific examples; pause time; visual supports, including augmentative/alternative communication tools; and individualized sensory modifications.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the typical neurodevelopmental trajectory that leads to spoken language.
• Describe neurodevelopmental differences that are known to occur in autism.
• Apply known neurodevelopmental differences to treatment design for language disorder associated with autism.

9:30 am - 10:00 am

Technical Session 6 Impact of a Combined Respiratory Intervention in Patients With ALS

Cara Donohue, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh
Jim Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, University of Pittsburgh

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a debilitating progressive neurodegenerative disease. Pulmonary function is a primary indicator of disease progression. Recent studies in animals/humans have shown that moderate exercise training in patients with ALS is beneficial. This study examined the safety, tolerability and impact of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) combined with respiratory-swallow coordination training (RST) compared to EMST alone and a control group, on pulmonary, cough, surrogates of swallow function and diaphragm thickness in people with ALS. This study provides preliminary research evidence that EMST+RST is a safe, well-tolerated and efficacious intervention in patients with ALS in addition to EMST alone.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Explain the relationship between respiratory and swallow function.
• List individual characteristics of patients with ALS that are important to consider before deploying respiratory interventions.
• Describe the role of respiratory interventions in palliative care in patients with ALS to improve quality of life.

9:45 am - 11:15 am

Seminar 52 Evaluation of Cognitive Linguistic Deficits Post-Concussion: Role of Speech-Language Pathology

Kelly Knollman-Porter, PhD, CCC-SLP, Miami University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Currently, no single gold standard method to assess the physical, emotional and cognitive changes experienced by individuals following mTBI/concussion exists. In addition, mTBI/concussion is considered challenging to assess secondary to the rapidly evolving and often invisible symptoms experienced following injury. With ever increasing productivity demands, the speech-language pathologist is required to utilized efficient methods of assessment that effectively detect the cognitive linguistic domains that impact performance during required activities for individuals post-injury. Speech-language pathologists have the diagnostic skills required to play an integral role in evaluating the acute and sometimes chronic cognitive linguistic deficits experienced by athletes and non-athletes post-mTBI/concussion. Current research along with case studies illustrating the strengths and limitations of evaluative methods and techniques to more efficiently determine factors impacting functional performance following injury will be discussed. In addition, guidance on how a multiple methods approach using self-report, standardized and functional measures will be highlighted.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Describe the inherent challenges evaluating individuals following acute and chronic mTBI/concussion.
• Define the strengths and limitations of currently available tools to evaluate individuals following acute and chronic mTBI/concussion.
• Identify the benefits of using a multiple method approach (i.e., self-report, standardized and functional measures) to evaluate the sequelae of symptoms experienced following acute and chronic mTBI/concussion.
• Discuss the value of a multidisciplinary assessment approach to mTBI/concussion assessment.

10:00 am - 10:30 am

Technical Session 7 What Happens After High School?: AAC User and Caregiver Perspectives

Taylor Hirneisen, BS, Misericordia University
Tara O'Neill, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University
Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Individuals who experience complex communication needs benefit from AAC technologies, yet access to and support for effective technologies is not always a guarantee. This study used semi-structured interviews to gain the perspectives of adult AAC users and their caregivers on the availability of AAC supports after high school graduation. The participants included seven adults who used AAC with various acquired and developmental disabilities and four caregivers. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four major themes emerged from the data: (a) supports for AAC use, (b) barriers and challenges for AAC use, (c) AAC systems and (d) need for change. Participants indicated that familial, community, professional and interpersonal connections and relationships were important to support technology use after high school. Barriers included family challenges, negative experiences with professionals, lack of knowledge regarding supports, funding issues, limited or unavailable resources and general misunderstanding of AAC users. Participants described both limitations and supports of AAC systems, and indicated that “no single option” met all of their communication needs—all participants benefitted from multimodal AAC systems. Finally, participants identified several areas where changes are needed to improve AAC services and supports for adult AAC users. Implications for optimizing AAC supports and services for adult AAC users after high school will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Assess the importance of understanding adult AAC users’ perspectives on resources available post-secondary graduation.
• Identify key themes from the study.
• Show several clinical implications for working with adult AAC users.

10:30 am - 11:00 am

Technical Session 8 Word Learning in Children Who Do and Do Not Stutter

Erica Lescht, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh
Courtney Venker, PhD, CCC-SLP, Michigan State University
Amanda Hampton Wray, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Stuttering is a multifactorial neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by disruptions in the fluent production of speech (e.g., Bloodstein & Bernstein Ratner, 2008). Theories of stuttering posit that interactions between language, cognition and emotion systems and a vulnerable speech motor system contribute to the development of stuttering (e.g., Smith & Weber, 2017). Previous studies have investigated specific aspects of language and phonological working memory using nonword repetition tasks, where children immediately repeat speakable nonwords (e.g., Hakim & Bernstein Ratner, 2004). Children who stutter (CWS) have been found to perform significantly less accurately compared to children who do not stutter (CWNS) on this task. Importantly, nonword repetition has been found to be associated with word learning (e.g., Gathercole, 2006) in CWNS. The current study aimed to investigate the nature of these relationships in CWS. Nineteen CWS and 22 CWNS, aged three to eight years, were trained on six words, two, three and four syllables in length, paired with an image of an unfamiliar object. Children then completed an immediate testing phase, where they identified the appropriate picture-target word pairs. Children then repeated the learning and testing phases a second time. Immediately and one hour after training, children completed receptive and expressive recall tasks, identifying and labeling the trained object names. Preliminary analyses suggest both CWS and CWNS were able to successfully learn all six words. Additional analyses are ongoing. Results will be presented and interpreted within existing theories of stuttering. Potential implications for therapy will also be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Define word learning.
• Describe the gaps in the literature on word learning in children who stutter.
• Describe the potential implications of word learning abilities in children who do and do not stutter.
• Assess implications of these findings for children who stutter.

11:00 am - 11:30 am

Technical Session 9 AAC in Schools: What Makes A Specialist a Specialist?

Eric Sanders, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian College
Thomas Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, The University of North Carolina­Chapel Hill
Deborah Lesher, MS, CCC-SLP, Columbia Regional Program

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) play a pivotal role in the assessment and treatment of students who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in educational settings. In fact, more than half of SLPs working in schools report working with a student who has a complex communication need (CCN; ASHA, 2018). To address this need, some school districts employ SLPs who are AAC specialists as part of an educational team (Da Fonte & Boesch, 2018). AAC specialists are considered important team members who often conduct assessments and provide consultative or direct services for those who require AAC (Da Fonte & Boesch, 2018). However, there is currently no uniformity across school districts or the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) in terms of what skills constitute an AAC specialist in educational settings. The purpose of this presentation is to present results from an anonymous survey to identify professional characteristics that contribute to and predict whether an SLP is likely to self-report if they are an AAC specialist. The survey was completed online by 272 school-based SLPs across the United States of which 35 percent identified themselves as an AAC specialist. Thematic analyses of open-ended response and logistic regression will be undertaken to identify the professional characteristics that may contribute to whether an SLP self-identifies as being an AAC specialist or not. These results will be discussed relative to the role of SLPs in AAC service provision in educational settings. As AAC specialists are considered essential contributors in implementing and conveying best-practice, this study is an important first step to better define this role.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• List common traits of self-identified AAC specialists as identified through thematic analysis.
• Identify which variables (e.g., caseload makeup, preparation, continuing education) best statistically predict those SLPs who self-identify as AAC specialists.
• Describe how AAC specialization may influence confidence in professional practice.

11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Seminar 53 Managing the Thicket of Pediatric Ethics

Donna Edwards, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, ASHA-F, Baldwin Wallace University,
Paula Leslie, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Lancashire, UK

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

We will discuss the ethics of decision making and complex situations that arise in the practice of speech-language pathology in relation to pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders. Case studies will be shared to develop learning and the application of ethical and medical concepts. This will lead to enhanced clinical decision making and client care across medical and educational settings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Discuss ethical conundrums in relation to complex pediatric care in schools and medical placements.
• Integrate discussed evaluation and treatment processes across settings (school, clinic, hospital, daycare, home and community).
• Describe four recent research resources supporting treatment and evaluation of dysphagia in infants and toddlers.

11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Seminar 54 Acute and Chronic Concussion Management: Evidence-Based Approaches for Treatment

Kelly Knollman-Porter, PhD, CCC-SLP, Miami University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

The neurocognitive symptoms experienced by people following mTBI/concussion can negatively influence performance on required academic and/or work-related activities for days, weeks, months or years. Understanding the unique post-injury experiences and management needs of this population is warranted so speech-language pathologists can more readily provide early, effective and valuable care that will facilitate the successful return to daily activities. During the presentation, the speaker will discuss how guidelines provided by the Centers for Disease Control, along with evidence from the field of speech-language pathology can guide clinicians on how to help care for children and adults with mTBI/concussion. Application of currently available strategies and technique (e.g., direct interventions, strategy straining, use of technology and academic and/or work-related adjustments) based on time post-onset of the mTBI/concussion with illustrative example, through the use of case studies will be utilized throughout the presentation. In addition, special focus will be directed toward the value of person-centered goal development and education.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Apply the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for mTBI/concussion management directly to speech-language pathology practices.
• Describe currently available evidence based treatment approaches for the management of the sequelae of acute and chronic post-mTBI/concussion.
• Explain compensatory approaches to concussion management including strategy training, use of technology and academic and/or work-related adjustments.
• Assess the value of patient-centered goal setting and education.

Seminar 55 Creating/Adapting Therapy Materials for Telepractice and Computer-Based Therapy

William Bolden III, MA, CCC-SLP, Kent State University

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Telepractice, along with computer-based activities, are a growing therapy model within the field of speech-language pathology, yet many clinicians find themselves at a loss when it comes to finding and creating therapy materials. In this seminar, we will learn how to make the most of the built-in features found in most video conference platforms, how to create new, engaging and interactive activities, as well as how to adapt books and other print resources that therapists may have used previously in therapy. Multiple examples and demos will be given. Additionally, these techniques can be used for traditional onsite therapists interested in using computer-based therapy materials.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify and utilize the basic screen sharing features/tools which are built in to most video conference platforms.
• Formulate interactive materials for telepractice and computer based therapy using a variety of computer based applications (e.g., Microsoft office).
• Adapt books and other print resources for sharing through electronic video/screen sharing platforms.

 

Pennsylvania Speech Language Hearing Association
700 McKnight Park Drive, Suite 708 | Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15237
412-366-9858 | 412-366-8804 fx
psha@psha.org
ASHA.org
 
©2010 Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association | All rights reserved.