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Posters - Thursday, 11:30 am-1:30 pm

Posters - Thursday, 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

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Sheraton Station Square

Continuing Education

PSHA Exhibitors

Poster Session

Thursday, 11:30 am - 1:30 pm

Advocacy in Schools: More Views from Three Perspectives

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Lori Cimino, MS, CCC-SLP; Adina Rosenthal, MS, CCC-SLP; Lisa Giuffre; Jenna Reed; Gerrica Clouse; Kayla Thorpe; Bailey Hartung; Taylor Header, Misericordia University

(Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

This ethnographic study analyzed interviews of seven school administrators, seven school-based speech-language pathologists and seven caregivers of school-age children with communication disorders. The goal of the study was to identify perspectives of all team members regarding which factors lead to collaboration in planning for the needs of students. Clinical applications will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify one perspective of a caregiver when advocating for a student with communication disorders.
  • Identify one perspective of a school SLP when advocating for a student with communication disorders.
  • Identify one perspective of a school administrator when advocating for a student with communication disorders.
  • Identify one clinical application for school team collaboration related to students with communication disorders.
  • Assessing Mindfulness Among Adults Who Stutter: Preliminary Findings

    Mary Martin; Taylor Wach; Mark Pellowski, PhD, Towson University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Levels of mindfulness were assessed among 92 adults who stutter. Participants completed the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale-Revised (Feldman, 2007) and the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (State & Trait version; Brown & Ryan, 2003). Findings indicated that the participants exhibited lower levels of mindfulness when compared to normative data. Clinical implications will be discussed regarding the relationship between mindfulness and stuttering in the field of speech language pathology.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define and describe mindfulness
  • Measure levels of mindfulness
  • Describe how mindfulness affects people who stutter
  • Describe how mindfulness affects the clinician and client during the administration of SLP treatment
  • Autonomic Nervous System Correlations With Language in Stuttering Versus. Cluttering

    Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Jenna Reed; Taylor Header; Bailey Hartung; Lisa Giuffre; Gerrica Clouse, Misericordia University

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    Performance on standardized language measures and autonomic nervous system tasks were compared in a group of adults who clutter, adults who stutter and controls. Results revealed differences in the three groups for physiologic symptoms experience during high stress tasks. These symptoms were correlated with increased disfluency, and increased time to complete tasks involving language formulation. Results will be linked to past literature and future research and clinical implications will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Explain differences in physiologic symptoms between the three study groups.
    • Explain differences in disfluency between the three study groups.
    • Explain differences in time to complete tasks between the three study groups.
    • Identify one clinical implication of study findings.

    BMI and Vocal Intensity

    Elaine Shuey, PhD, CCC-SLP; Megan Lawrence, BS; Samantha Ward, BS; Spring 2019 Speech Science Class, East Stroudsburg University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant relationship between body mass index and vocal intensity at three different levels of vocal effort. Historically, it was believed that body mass index (BMI) had no relationship to voice. However, in a recent research study conducted by Jost et al. (2018), they found a significant relationship between higher body weight and higher sound pressure levels at soft speech, normal speech and projected speech. The present study replicated one small part of the Jost et al. study. Students complete the required training for researchers, an IRB was secured and all subjects came from the class itself. A graduate student followed the Jost et al. directions to calculate average vocal intensity levels at soft, normal and projected levels. Students used a BMI calculator on an NIH website to calculate their BMI. This information was kept confidential from others. The final data sheets had only the BMI and dB values with no identifiers. The data was subjected to three separate correlations, one for each effort level. The correlation of BMI to soft effort was -.352; to normal effort was -.368; to projected effort was -.235. Not only were these correlations not very strong, they were actually the opposite of what was expected. Higher BMI was associated with lower dB. These results will be discussed in terms of the Jost et al. study and others that have dealt with this topic.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Explain how BMI and vocal intensity are measured.
    • Explain studies that have found varying results regarding the relationship of BMI and vocal intensity.
    • Describe research, IRB and privacy requirements that were part of this study.

    Cluttering and Language Organization: Qualitative Symptoms in Standardized Tasks

    Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Taylor Header; Bailey Hartung; Jenna Reed; Lisa Giuffre; Gerrica Clouse, Misericordia University

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    In a sample of 12 adults who clutter and 12 controls, comparisons were made between standardized measures of language in terms of score, timing to complete, and revisions of thought. Results revealed average standard scores for all participants, but increased time to complete tasks and increased revisions of thought among the adults who clutter as compared to controls. Clinical and future research applications will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe how participants performed on standardized language tasks.
    • Show the difference in time to complete tasks between adults who clutter and controls.
    • Define the difference in revisions of thought between adults who clutter and controls.
    • Identify one clinicial implication of study findings.

    Digital Highlighting Effects on Reading Comprehension for Adults With Aphasia

    Karen Hux, PhD, CCC-SLP, Quality Living, Inc.; Rebecca Bulgarelli, BS, Duquesne University; Anna Saylor, BS, Duquesne University; Erica Lapp, BS, Duquesne University; Camille Deville, BS, Miami University; Natasha Morales, Boston University; Kelly Knollman-Porter, PhD, CCC-SLP, Miami University; Sarah Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP, Duquesne University; Jessica Brown, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Arizona

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    Digital reading devices and text-to-speech (TTS) technology are increasing in popularity given society’s greater reliance on technology for daily reading tasks. For some adults with aphasia, TTS technology facilitates the comprehension of written reading materials of personal interest (i.e., newspaper articles) (Wallace, Knollman-Porter, Brown, & Hux, 2019). Additionally, available TTS software and applications have various presentation features (e.g., voice, speed, highlighting) that are adaptable to an individual’s comprehension needs and preferences. Specifically, digital highlighting of single words, sentences, phrases, or paragraphs can synchronize with the audio narration of TTS, potentially influencing attention to the text and comprehension. However, the effectiveness of simultaneous highlighting and TTS on the comprehension of written text for people with aphasia has not been examined in previous research studies. Twenty-five adults with chronic aphasia reviewed 36 edited newspaper articles presented via TTS system in one of three conditions: no highlight, single word highlighting, and sentence highlighting. Participants answered six multiple choice comprehension questions and indicated their preferences after reviewing the articles. A repeated measured analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated no significant difference across highlighting conditions. However, participants achieved the highest average comprehension accuracy score in the single word highlighting condition. As a group, participants expressed the greatest preference for the sentence highlighting condition. Rationales for several preferences are highlighted. Despite a lack of significant accuracy difference across highlighting conditions, the findings of the current study will help guide clinicians integrate TTS technology into therapy treatment as a comprehension support when working with people with aphasia.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the use of text-to-speech systems to support reading comprehension impairments in people with aphasia.
    • Describe the effects of highlighting during text-to-speech presentation on comprehension by people with aphasia.
    • Describe preferences of people with aphasia related to highlighting during text-to-speech presentation.

    Do Emotional, Personal Accounts Affect Perceptions of Stuttering?

    Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University; Quinn Kelley, Misericordia University; Jillian Scanlon, Misericordia University; Faith Foster, Misericordia University; Cara Imbalzano, BS, Misericordia University; Rickson Mesquita, PhD, University of Campinas; Sergio Novi, MS, University of Campinas; Arjun Yodh, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of typically fluent speakers (TFS) when presented with videos of people discussing positive and negative experiences they had had in relation to their stuttering. This study provides insight into the various outlooks TFS have towards stuttering. To collect data for this study, Mindware Technologies and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) were used. Mindware Technologies was used to assess responses of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) while fNIRS was used to monitor hemoglobin concentration changes in the brain. Pre- and post- baseline data was obtained as participants viewed a blank screen before and after stimuli. Participants watched several emotionally arousing conditions of males and females speaking about the positive and negative effects of stuttering. The videos lasted for 20 seconds each and participants were presented with a 20-second rest between each stimulus to ensure that the data returned to baseline. After ANS and fNIRS data collection, participants completed a survey evaluating their feelings towards the videos and their familiarity with persons who stutter in general. ANS, fNIRS and survey data were compared to determine if there were any correlations. Detailed results and implications for therapy will be discussed at the PSHA Convention.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Analyze how TFS react to watching videos of positive and negative experiences with stuttering.
    • Identify the comfortability levels of TFS when exposed to dysfluent speech.
    • Describe any possible clinical implications the results may implicate.

    Experience and Perceptions of CSD Students Participating in a Professional Journal Club

    Melissa Brydon, PhD, CCC-SLP; Kenneth Staub, MS, CCC-SLP; Amanda Funari, BS; Lindsey Johnson, BS, Clarion University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Journal clubs have been utilized in the medical profession for over a century as means to ensure that students stay abreast of the current literature, while simultaneously improving their ability to evaluate research and hone their critical thinking skills. Despite a clear place in medicine, a field which shares the same standards for evidenced-based practice as speech-language pathology, a paucity of research is available examining the use of journal clubs in the education of students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD). Given the long history of success of journal clubs in the medical field, these authors implemented a pilot program to explore the potential application of a journal club in the education of CSD students. This session will report upon findings from a mixed methods study that investigated the perception of upper level students (juniors, seniors and graduate students) of the journal club experience, with emphasis placed on the learning that occurred and whether it fostered an increased interest in research in the field. After voluntarily participating in a CSD journal club over the course of seven months, students completed a researcher-designed survey for the purpose of sampling opinion and evaluating the program. Though the results in all areas were overwhelmingly positive, students did indicate some ways in which the experience could be enhanced. During this session, the researchers will share their methodology for implementing the journal club, the students’ quantitative perceptions of the experience and modifications that were made based on qualitative feedback to improve the club going forward.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the benefits of using journal clubs as an extracurricular means of supplementing the standard CSD curriculum to promote learning, research, and critical thinking outside of the classroom.
    • Generalize the presented methodology, integrating and modifying the discussed principles and practices as needed into the development of a journal club within their own academic or clinical work setting.
    • Analyze the methodology of the presented journal club experience to identify strengths and ways to improve areas that might be considered weaknesses for the overall improvement of such a learning experience.

    Journey Out of Silence-Aiyana's Story: Selective Mutism Integrated Approach

    Barbara Coaxum, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Therapy Solutions, Inc.; Sandra Sadeghi, MSEd, Stratford Friends School

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    A case study report of an 11 year olds journey and challenges with selective mutism (SM) over the course of a three-and-a-half-year period using an integrated approach involving the speech-language pathologist and the classroom teachers. This poster will focus on practical ideas and strategies used by both the SLP and teachers and how through their combined efforts, were able to guide and help Aiyana speak after never having spoken in school for four years. Presenters will discuss the impact that selective mutism has on a family and will discuss strategies that facilitated the transformation of a child from silence to a child who was able to find her voice through a variety of approaches that involved the integration and collaboration of speech-language pathology and classroom-based interventions. This poster will also focus on the importance of technology incorporation in helping to bridge the gap in Aiyana’s journey to becoming verbal in school.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define components and characteristics of selective mutism (SM)
  • Apply new approaches to working with children experiencing SM
  • Analyze overall communication and academic impact of SM and will explore the importance of collaborating with classroom teachers.
  • Analyze the impact that SM has on families
  • Learning Anatomy and Physiology Through a Computer-Based Cadaveric Dissection

    Emily Magrini; Julia Regnault; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the benefits of using a computer based cadaver to allow students to learn concepts of anatomy and physiology. Understanding the concepts of anatomy and physiology is a crucial skill to become a successful speech-language pathologist. Knowing about the different regions of the human body and their functions is key to understanding the areas speech-language pathologists need for their professions (e.g., brain, larynx, hearing, lungs, etc.). With the use of a computer-based cadaver, it can be extremely helpful in teaching as well as to give students a visual representation of what they are learning. This computer program, Anatomage, will give students the knowledge of anatomy needed for clinical settings and beyond. The computer-based cadaver program currently has two complete body cadavers as well as high resolution images of regional anatomy. Not only can students view the different cadavers, but they can also perform dissections of the body and move it 360 degrees. This ensures an optimal learning experience. Another valuable aspect the program includes the histology section that is full of microscopic images of cells. This technology will help students to advance their knowledge for educational purposes as well as research. Students can utilize information from classroom lectures and apply it toward gaining a more hands-on experience with the computer-based cadaver.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Explain how to navigate the computer based cadaver technology.
    • Explain the benefits of using this technology in Speech-Language Pathology education.
    • Identify how to use this technology in both an educational and professional settings.
    • Identify the various regions of the human body.

    Mental Health in Persons With Hearing Loss

    Olivia Ruppel; Susan Dillmuth-Miller, AuD, East Stroudsburg University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    This poster presentation will compare mental health in persons who are deaf and sign, persons with deafness who communicate orally and persons with typical hearing. Research will show if there are significant differences in prevalence of mental health conditions across the above-defined groups. Factors that make persons with deafness more vulnerable to mental health issues will be discussed. Specifically, depression, anxiety, addictions and obsessive-compulsive disorder will be compared across the above-defined populations as well as suicide rates. Signs and symptoms of someone in need of assistance for mental health will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Assess the prevalence of mental health disorders in the Deaf community.
    • Assess various mental health disorders across the population studied.
    • Identify signs in someone who is in need of help.

    Observations of Literacy Instruction for Individuals Who Use AAC

    Jessica Caron, PhD, Penn State University; Leah Brush, BS, Penn State University; Emilia Livi, Penn State University; Meghan O'Brien, MS, CCC-SLP, Boston’s Children’s Hospital

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    There is currently a gap between research and practice related to the implementation of adapted literacy instruction for individuals who use AAC. This is not surprising considering current practitioners consistently report that they do not feel they have the training or necessary skills to teach these individuals. There are evidence-based literacy practices to instruct individuals who have complex communication needs and require AAC. In order to close the research to practice gap, a better understanding of current practices is necessary. In the current study researchers asked 10 professionals to plan and implement a 10 to 15-minute literacy session for one of their students with CCN. Observations were then analyzed using an a priori coding system; the coding system was developed based on components of effective literacy instruction, including: (1) making instruction meaningful, (2) providing sufficient time, (3) targeting appropriate literacy skills, (4) using effective instructional procedures and (5) providing adaptations to support participation. Results will be discussed per major coding area. Overall, results indicate that professionals were able to provide adaptations for independent participation (e.g., low-tech or high-tech supports), as well as create materials that were meaningful and personally relevant. Yet, the professionals lacked implementation of effective instructional procedures and did not provide sufficient time for instruction for relevant literacy skills. There is a currently an urgent need for literacy training at the pre-service and in-service level in order to provide effective literacy instruction. Ideas for future research directions, including access to online trainings, will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify four key components of literacy instruction for individuals with complex communication needs who use AAC.
    • Explain the gap between research and practice in literacy instruction for individuals with complex communication needs and advocate for training in that area.
    • Assess one evidence-based approach to literacy that should be included in instruction and why it is necessary.

    Performance of Individuals With Rheumatic Disease on the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test

    LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP, East Stroudsburg University

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    Rheumatic disease results in the presence of inflammation in the body. Current research is exploring the impact of this inflammatory process on the brain. Individuals with rheumatic disease often complain about memory loss and other cognitive deficits. This poster will briefly review the current evidence regarding a link between inflammation and memory loss. Results of a preliminary study on the memory abilities of individuals with rheumatic disease will be presented. The relationship between sleep, pain and fatigue and performance on memory tasks will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify cognitive-linguistic deficits associated with rheumatic disease.
    • Discuss the relationship between sleep, pain and fatigue and memory for individuals with rheumatic disease.
    • Discuss two challenges in completing research with individuals with rheumatic disease.
    • Identify one memory test appropriate for use with adults.

    Perspectives of Adult Part-Time AAC Users With ASD

    Taylor Hirneisen, BS; Abbigail Hoke; Alana Talvacchia; Chelsea Korbich; Tara O'Neill, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Adults with autism, including those who speak in some contexts, may experience intermittent, unreliable and or insufficient speech. These adults cannot rely on speech alone to meet all of their communication needs. In these situations, they often benefit from unaided and aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) supports to enhance their communication, such as sign language, text messaging applications and communication apps on mobile technologies. However, little is known about the barriers and supports for learning about and using AAC for adult users with ASD who rely on AAC part-time. This poster presents a case study of three adult part-time AAC users with ASD. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, and thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Five major themes emerged from the data: social support, no single option, independent navigation, societal barriers and positive and negative experiences. The adult participants reported that while they were pleased with their AAC technologies, they still required additional modes of communication. They reported that there was often an absence of outside support, and societal barriers created limitations for using AAC in everyday life. Results provide important implications for improving AAC supports and services for part-time AAC users with ASD.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Discuss the importance of understanding the perspectives of adult part-time AAC users with ASD.
    • Identify key themes from the study.
    • Demonstrate several clinical implications for working with adult AAC users with ASD.
    • Demonstrate one direction for future research.

    Psychophysiological and Cortical Responses While Observing Self-Disclosure in Stuttering

    Jillian Scanlon, Misericordia University; Quinn Kelley, Misericordia University; Faith Foster, Misericordia University; Cara Imbalzano, BS, Misericordia University; Rickson Mesquita, PhD, University of Campinas; Sergio Novi, MS, University of Campinas; Arjun Yodh, PhD, University of Pennsylvania; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

    The purpose of this study was to identify the differences between psychophysiological and cortical responses of typically fluent speakers (TFS) when presented with videos of stuttering when the person self-discloses about stuttering and not self-disclosing. This study provides insight into both the attitudes and comfort levels of TFS as they listen to either self-disclosing or not self-disclosing about stuttering. Mindware Technologies and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) were used to collect data for this study. Mindware Technologies was used to assess autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses while fNIRS was used to monitor hemoglobin concentration changes in the brain. To obtain baseline data, participants were exposed to a blank screen both pre- and post-stimuli. Participants watched a timed, randomized suite presentation on E-Prime 3.0. The stimuli consisted of videos of self-disclosing about stuttering or not self-disclosing. Each condition occurred eight times. The videos were alternated with a 20-second rest period to ensure each participant’s data returned to baseline before the next stimuli occurred. After ANS and fNIRS data collection, participants completed a survey evaluating their comfortability and familiarity with persons who stutter, as well as how they felt while watching the videos. ANS, fNIRS and survey data were then compared to determine if there was any correlation. Detailed results and implications for therapy will be discussed at the PSHA Convention.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Analyze the impact of dysfluent speech on typically fluent speakers.
    • Analyze how TFS react to self-disclosure in comparison to no self-disclosure.
    • Identify possible clinical implications of the results.

    Starting an Affiliate Chapter of the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing

    Megane Muluh, BS; Elise Lindquist, MS, CCC-SLP; Nicole Etter, CCC-SLP

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, only eight percent of its members identify as a racial minority and about three percent as Black or African-American. Racial and ethnic diversity are as equally important as language, sex and gender diversity. The realization that the fields of speech language and hearing are not a representation of the clients they serve is clearly evident throughout our classrooms and workspace. It is important for patients to feel comfortable knowing that their therapists are aware of cultural and dialectical differences, especially when it comes to language and communication. The need for more black individuals, more minorities, and more cultural humility in speech, language, and hearing can be overcomed by establishing organizations such as the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing or NBASLH. The goal of this presentation is to model an affiliate chapter of NBASLH of 1) being established and 2) being run effectively to promote a number a black individuals in the fields of speech, language, and hearing, and promote advocates for these types of multicultural interests groups.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify the process in establishing an affiliate chapter of NBASLH at a perspective University or Institution.
    • Identify how NBASLH will be a viable mechanism through which the needs of black professionals, students and individuals with communication disorders can be met.
    • Describe ideas for meetings and outreach for your institution and surrounding community to promote the number of Black individuals in speech language and hearing.
    • Identify ways to promote being an advocate for black individuals and other diverse populations.

    Video VSD Play and Communication Intervention for Child With ASD

    Talia Tedesco, BS; Emily Laubscher, CCC-SLP; Janice Light, PhD; Allison Barwise, CCC-SLP; Nicole Etter, CCC-SLP, Penn State University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience deficits in both communication and play behaviors when compared to their same-age, typically developing peers. They benefit from direct instruction on communication and play to improve these skills. This study, which was part of a larger study (Laubscher, Barwise & Light, 2019), investigated the effects of a treatment package consisting of a video visual screen display (VSD) which provided opportunities for communication and examples of play behaviors on the number of turns in which children with ASD demonstrated both symbolic communication and functional or symbolic play skills during play interactions with an age-matched, typically developing peer. A single-case, multiple probe design was used to investigate the effects of this treatment package with a dyad consisting of one child with ASD and one child with typical development. The participant ASD demonstrated gains in the number of turns in which he demonstrated both symbolic communication and functional or symbolic play skills. These gains were generalized to different play activities, however were not maintained after one week without intervention. This study provides preliminary evidence that the implementation of a treatment package using video VSD technology can support gains in the number of turns in which children with ASD demonstrate both symbolic communication and functional or symbolic play skills.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe how video VSDs can be used to model play actions and provide communication opportunities
    • Describe the differences between communication and play for children with ASD and their typically developing peers
    • Describe the impact of a video VSD treatment package on play and communication for a child with ASD.

    What Do Parents of Children With Autism Think of SLPs?

    Elizabeth Heinmiller, BS; Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Tara O'Neill, PhD, CCC-SLP; Maureen Rinehimer, PhD, PT, DPT, Misericordia University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    This ethnographic study analyzed interviews with caregivers of children with level two or three autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in order to fill the existing gap of understanding the caregiver perspective when working directly with a speech-language pathologist (SLP). The goal of the study was to identify caregiver perspective on of the types of services they viewed as beneficial, the overall impact they felt SLPs had on their child and their family and wishes for types of support from SLPs. Preliminary results indicate that SLPs play a crucial role in the families of children with ASD. Emergent themes included increasing hope for the family, strength in advocacy and need for understanding family perspective. Clinical implications of study findings will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify one caregiver perspective of the role of speech-language pathologists in working with families of children with autism.
    • Identify one positive outcome of speech-language pathologists working with families of children with autism from the caregiver perspective.
    • Describe one way speech-language pathologists can better assist family members of children with autism from the caregiver perspective.

    Where to Begin? A Case Study on Communication, Behavior and Autism

    Andrea Helman, MA, CCC-SLP, The Watson Institute

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    When a student is placed on your caseload, often the first question you have is, where do I begin? This poster will reveal the ongoing data and outcomes of a case study following an 11-year-old male with non-verbal autism, intellectual disability and developmental delays. The case study follows the student from his start at a special education school and follows the progress he has made in the areas of communication and behavior over his first year enrolled. The student entered the special education school after being in a public school with no communication system to express wants or needs. Once communication systems were put into place for him, negative behaviors dropped significantly. The student began with simple photographs to express wants and needs, but quickly moved onto Mayer Johnson symbols and then to an iPad with the Proloquo2go app.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify different methods of communication that can be implemented.
    • Assess where to begin when starting with a child who has no means of expressive communication.
    • Compare increased communication and decreased negative behaviors.

    Thursday, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    Addressing Humor Skills in Learners of English as a Second Language

    Jill Brady, PhD, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    For learners of English as a second language, the comprehension and use American-style humor is often slowly acquired. While the importance of humor may not appear to be indispensable, it is vital for assimilation into American culture. Humor reflects shared human understanding. It also serves as a bridge between individuals and aids in establishing human relationships. Humor is also frequently used on television and other mass media and it is important to understanding these forms of communication. The comprehension and use of humor that is relevant to a culture depends upon both background knowledge and complex language skills. In terms of background knowledge, humor often depends upon understanding of current events and issues, as well as commonly known factual knowledge. Humor skills also depend upon both literal and figurative language skills. The ability to understand and produce humor depends on complex syntax and vocabulary. However, it also depends on the ability to understand and use both lexical and syntactic ambiguity. For example, the multiple meaning words are often used to create puns and ambiguous sentences are often used in jokes. In terms of figurative language, humor often includes the use of metaphors, idioms and hyperbole. This presentation will inform participants of the ways in which background knowledge and language skills underpin the acquisition of humor in learners of English as a second language. Additionally, suggestions for addressing each of these areas as well as humor more specifically will be provided.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify the importance of humor in social interaction.
    • Describe the language skills needed for humor comprehension and use.
    • Describe at least three strategies to address goals related to humor.

    Alpha Eta: The National Honor Society for the Health Sciences

    Courtney Brennan, BA; Cassandra Caraballo, BA; Cheryl Gunter, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    The invitation to membership in an honor society provides affirmation for the academic excellence a person has achieved. Alpha Eta is the national honor society for the allied health sciences. In January 2019, West Chester University became the home for the 90th chapter of this esteemed society. The charter of this chapter was the outcome of the Honors College Capstone Project for two West Chester University students in communication sciences and disorders. This presentation describes the history of Alpha Eta at the national level. The mission, the standards for membership, the national office, the national initiatives and the emblems of this esteemed society are included. This presentation then describes the steps involved in the establishment of a chapter of a national honor society at a university. These include: components of the application, compilation of the application packet, process of approval from the national executive board, process of approval from the university student activities office, review of potential members, extension of invitations to membership, preparation of induction event, creation of local executive board, promotion of honor society existence and sponsorship of events consistent with honor society mission. The chapter founders and co-presidents, with their faculty advisor, will describe the lessons they learned in the process of establishment of the chapter, as well as their plans for sustainability of the chapter.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the value of membership in a national honor society.
    • Describe the membership standards for Alpha Eta Honor Society.
    • Describe the steps in the charter of a national honor society chapter.
    • Describe ideas for honor society involvement on a university campus.

    Can Practicing Non-Dominant Hand Handwriting Improve Outcomes in Aphasia Therapy

    Molly Rafferty, BS, La Salle University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Background: Writing is a functional activity and a relevant aspect of everyday life. Individuals with aphasia often have deficits in written expression as a result of language impairments and difficulties with writing with their dominant hand due to right-sided weakness. Deficits in writing can be devastating to those with aphasia, as writing is often an essential component in aphasia therapy. Therefore, clients who find writing with their non-dominant hand to be difficult or burdensome may be unable to participate in specific aphasia treatments. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary information on learning to write with the non-dominant hand in healthy adults to guide future research on adults with aphasia. Methods: Twenty-nine participants aged 19-25 years were recruited and randomly allocated to 1 of 3 practice conditions: daily (non-dominant handwriting practice for 5 minutes/day, 5 days/week, for 3 weeks), weekly (non-dominant handwriting practice for 25 minutes/day, 1 day/week, for 3 weeks), or no-treatment control. Results: Positive changes in writing with the non-dominant hand were identified in healthy adults who practiced writing for 3 weeks. Participants who practiced writing weekly increased their speed significantly, but did not improve on legibility. Participants who practiced writing daily showed moderate improvements in legibility and a slight increase in writing speed. Conclusion: Findings indicate that treatment effects may be influenced by practice conditions. Additional research is needed to study the effects of writing practice in people with aphasia. Research on this topic provides SLPs with an opportunity to collaborate with occupational therapists.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe barriers individuals with aphasia face participating in specific aphasia treatments
    • Discuss suggestions for clinical research on writing in individuals with aphasia
    • Explain findings from an investigation on massed versus distributed handwriting practice with the non-dominant hand
    • Relate findings to issues in clinical practice

    Comparison of Two Voice Therapy Models

    Meghan Farrell, BA; Marianna Flowers, BA; Katherine Gale, BA; Heidi Liebenberg, BA; Caroline McLaughlin, BA; Tiffany Michael, BA; Samantha Postupack, BA; Elizabeth Grillo, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    The current study compared the relative effects of conversation training therapy (CTT) versus the Global voice prevention model (GVPM) in the prevention of voice problems. CTT uses the concept of clear speech in conversation without relying on a treatment hierarchy to indirectly adjust voice production (Gartner-Schmidt et al., 2016). The GVPM facilitates changes in voice production by determining the voice production technique or techniques that facilitates the best new vocal output(s), a bottom-up treatment hierarchy, production of new and old voice at each step of the hierarchy, and any additional methods that augment and support the target vocal output (Grillo, 2012, 2017, 2018). Using an alternating treatments single-subject design with multiple baselines across sessions, the authors compared CTT and GVPM in eight vocally healthy women across acoustic, perceptual and aerodynamic measures. This presentation will describe the two models, demonstrate the models through videos and present results.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the CTT and GVPM.
    • Define the single-subject design used in the study.
    • Compare the relative effects on acoustic perceptual, and aerodynamic measures for CTT versus the GVPM.

    Do SLP and Teacher Education Students’ Responses to Stuttering Differ?

    Cara Imbalzano, BS, Misericordia University; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University; Kathleen Scaler Scott,PhD , Misericordia University; Rickson Mesquita, PhD, University of Campinas; Sergio Novi, MS, University of Campinas; Arjun Yodh, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

    (Level of Instruction: Advanced)

    The purpose of this study was to determine cortical (fNIRS), autonomic nervous system (ANS) and survey responses of typically fluent speaking (TFS) speech-language pathology (SLP) and teacher education (TE) students as they observe three types of dysfluencies. This collective approach sought to determine if objective (fNIRS and ANS) and subjective (survey) data regarding comfort levels differed between dysfluencies and academic concentration. fNIRS measured hemoglobin concentration changes in the brain. To collect data, 16 sources shined non-invasive light through the scalp and skull and on to the surface of the brain and 16 detectors collected the scattered and absorbed light from the cortex. Mindware Technologies assessed the ANS through electrodes attached to the torso and hands to obtain heart rate, skin conductance and respiration rate. All participants were TFS students in the SLP and TE departments at Misericordia University.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Demonstrate procedures used to analyze autonomic nervous systems and hemoglobin concentrations within the brain.
    • Identify differences in emotional reactions of speech-language pathology and teacher education students to different dysfluencies.
    • Identify the differences in emotional reactions to different dysfluencies depending on familiarity with people who stutter.

    Exploring SLP Students’ Perception: Pilot IPE Program With Nursing Students

    Michelle Scesa, EdD; Helga McCullough, EdD; Elizabeth Lucas, Lebanon Valley College

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    The purpose of this study is to explore the speech-language pathology students’ readiness and attitudes towards collaborative simulation based learning experiences. Fourteen junior-level speech-language pathology students will interact with nursing students from PA College of Health Professions during a simulated learning experience that will use actors with potential communication disorders. This pilot program was created to expose our students to an early IPE experience and determine the preparation necessary for graduate-level IPE experiences. None of the speech-language pathology students have been exposed to simulation-based learning but some have participated in an IPE program with physical therapy and education students. This study will implement a pre/post-test design using the KidSIM ATTITUDES questionnaire as well as open-ended questions to gain more insight into concerns, learning gains and aspects of the experience that needs improvement. There will be three sessions with four or five students attending only one session each. Students will be encouraged not to share their experiences with other students enrolled at later dates. The simulation will be led by the PA College of Health Sciences faculty, who regularly conduct clinical simulation experiences. The students will be provided a pre-brief, the simulation and debriefing.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify areas of improvement for IPE simulation experience.
    • Analyze the benefits of an undergraduate IPE experience.
    • Analyze the benefits of IPE experiences with nursing students.
    • Identify students' perceptions before and after an IPE simulation experience.

    Generational Differences in Work Ethic Among Pennsylvania Speech-Language Pathologists

    Helga McCullough, EdD, Lebanon Valley College

    This study used a quantitative, non-experimental, cross-sectional design to better understand work ethic among four generations of speech-language pathologists licensed in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The author sent a letter of invitation containing a link to an online survey to speech-language pathologists licensed in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, via the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association membership directory. A total of 860 responses were received with 814 being used for analysis. Findings suggest that the four distinct generations of speech-language pathologists licensed in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania exhibit more similarities in work ethic than they do differences. These findings could be beneficial to employers for recruitment and retention purposes as well as to speech-language pathologists who work with colleagues of different generational cohorts.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify the four different generations of speech-language pathologists included in this study.
    • Identify the seven dimensions of work ethic analyzed by the multidimensional work ethic profile.
    • Identify the dimensions of work ethic in which there were statistically significant differences between the generational cohorts and those in which there were no statistically significant differences.

    Hemispheric Processing of Iconicity and its Role in Language Therapy

    Vijayachandra Ramachandra, PhD; Anne Johnson, BS, Marywood University

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    Languages are generally ‘arbitrary’ in nature. For example, in English, there is no inherent connection between the word ‘dog’ and the actual entity it is referring to (the animal dog). That is, the word ‘dog’ has nothing embedded in it that can provide us clues indicating its meaning. Many recent studies have challenged this notion. A number of languages (such as Japanese, Korean, sub-Saharan African language, etc.) and number of words in English such as “meow”, “splash”, “trill”, “moo”, etc. are non-arbitrary (or iconic) in nature. In the current study, we used a simple line bisection test to explore hemispheric processing of arbitrary and iconic words (presented auditorily) in 20 healthy young adults. Preliminary findings suggest a left hemispheric dominance (right side line bisection bias) for both arbitrary and iconic words. Many recent studies indicate the benefits of iconicity in language acquisition in children and language recovery in people with aphasia. By combining the results of the current experiment on hemispheric processing with these other recent findings, we will discuss the role of iconicity in language acquisition, and facilitating language recovery in persons with aphasia and other acquired language disorders.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Discuss how different types of words and environmental sounds are processed in the brain
    • Discuss how iconicity aids language acquisition in children
    • Describe how iconicity can facilitate language recovery in people with acquired language disorders.

    Influences of Television on Parent-Child Interactions and Language Development

    Kira Silimperi, BS; Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian College

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Parent-child interaction is critical to a child’s language development. As technology use is rapidly expanding, understanding its influence on parent-child dyad is a common question shared by both parents and professionals who work with children. Critically appraising the existing evidence based on this topic can help the clinician make informed clinical decisions and clinical suggestions. A literature search on major databases was conducted to find peer-reviewed studies that focused on the research topic of interest. At the end of the search, four original research studies most relevant to this clinical research topic were selected and included in this critically appraised topic (White, Raghavendra, & McAllister, 2017). The critical appraisal of evidence highlighted the influence of television viewing on both the quality and quantity of caregiver-child interactions.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the influence of television on parent-child interaction.
    • Summarize the influence of television on language development.
    • List the steps involved in the critical appraisal of a focused clinical research question.

    Let's Talk Communication: Empowering Parents to Confidently Facilitate Communication

    Brighde Foley, BS, Moravian College; Morgan Gray, BS, Moravian College; Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian College; Elizabeth Crossley, BS, La Salle University

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    This study aims to determine if a text messaging service, providing communication tips and encouragement twice a week over 2 months, will improve parental confidence in facilitating their baby’s communication development. This study aims to answer the following questions: What kind of information do new parents want to know about communication development? How effective is a text messaging service as a platform to distribute information? Does our text messaging tool improve parental attitudes and confidence in communicating with their child? Parents of babies 0-18 months of age will be invited to participate in this pilot study. Individuals will be recruited through the researchers’ social circles. Participants will be given 2 questionnaires and a semi-structured interview throughout this study. The first questionnaire is used to gather information in two parts: 1) to understand how the participants describe their child’s current level of communication 2) to understand the parents’ current knowledge of facilitation of communication development. A semi-structured interview will be given after 2 weeks of using the text messaging service to assess their level of satisfaction with the service itself. Another questionnaire will be given to gather views on the text messaging tool’s impact. The knowledge gained in this study can be used to potentially implement a useful and cost effective way to improve communication between parents and speech language pathologists. By empowering parents to become more confident in facilitating their baby’s communication development, speech language pathologists are fulfilling the role of prevention of communication disorders.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify the kind of information parents are looking for in regards to communication development
    • Identify if text messaging is an effective platform to distribute information
    • Identify if our text messaging tool improves parental attitudes and confidence in communicating with their child.

    Preliminary Characterization of Language and Cognition in Veterans With PTSD

    Tonya Griggs-Smith, BS; Skye Lewis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Francis Marion University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is likely underdiagnosed in the United States, the most recent figures from the Department of Veteran Affairs suggest 31 persent of Vietnam veterans, 10 percent of Gulf War veterans, 11 percent of Afghanistan veterans and 20 percent of Iraqi War veterans have been labeled with the condition thus far. Recent investigations have suggested a possible link between PTSD and dementia due to stress-related memory decline. The various types of dementia (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia) affect language and cognition differently, but share common problems with memory. The diagnoses of PTSD and dementia can be devasting to both veterans and their families. At this time, medical science has not determined why certain individuals are more susceptible to internalizing trauma or why others are prone to cognitive decline. It is unclear whether a soldier with a diagnosis of PTSD should someday expect the onset of dementia and if there is a relationship between the two conditions. This exploratory study was approved by the Francis Marion University Institutional Review Board and investigated cognition and language through formal tests as well as a novel questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed specific information related to military experiences and related emotions during and after service. Preliminary data will be presented during this session.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • List the characteristics of PTSD.
    • Identify two language skills that may be impaired in individuals with PTSD.
    • Identify two areas of cognition that may be impaired in individuals with PTSD.

    Promoting Clinical Skills and Cultural Competence in A Study Abroad

    Patricia Swasey Washington, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    With the increased cultural and linguistic diversity in the United States, speech-language pathologists must be properly trained in service delivery. Part of the strategic objectives of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association is to ASHA’s strategic objectives is to enhance international engagement and increase members’ cultural competence (ASHA, 2017). It is the responsibility of both monolingual and bilingual speech-language pathologists to work effectively with individuals from various languages and cultures. It is, therefore, incumbent upon university speech-language programs to provide this necessary preparation. As part of this effort, clinical study abroad opportunities can improve the cultural competence and clinical skills (Krishnan, Richards & Simpson, 2016). This presentation will report on the student performance of clinical and cultural activities for a speech-language pathology study abroad program in Costa Rica during the summer of 2019. Results of pre- and post-visit student surveys and faculty evaluation of student performance, will be presented. Additionally, similarities and differences between outcomes for undergraduate and graduate students will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify a rationale for providing a clinical study abroad in speech-language pathology.
    • List at least three clinical aspects that have improved following a clinical study abroad.
    • List at least three cultural competence aspects that have improved following a clinical study abroad.
    • List two areas that students need to improve based on study abroad results.

    Real-World Success: Cultivating the Carryover of Communication Skills

    Erica Cappellini, MS, CCC-SLP, Centennial School of Lehigh University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    SLPs often struggle when clients demonstrate skills during structured speech sessions but then do not use them in natural settings. Although most SLPs may think of generalization as primarily relevant to articulation and phonology, the ability to apply appropriate communication skills independently across environments is a true measure of success for all speech therapy. This poster presentation will provide methods to ensure a focus on carryover throughout the treatment process. Drawing upon existing research and her work experience in school, skilled nursing, preschool, clinic, hospital and home settings, the presenting author will also share her clinical expertise and suggest specific strategies for therapists to use to increase successful generalization of communication skills in their environments.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • List at least three ways to ensure that carryover is a focus and why generalization should be an integral part of therapy.
    • Identify how to select meaningful communication targets that clients will use in the real world.
    • Describe steps to maximize the generalization of skills targeted in pull-out, structured speech sessions.
    • Explain the importance of collaboration with others in facilitating carryover.

    Spanish Vocabulary Acquisition in Monolingual English Speaking Preschoolers

    Hannah Lakatos, BS; Melissa Brydon, PhD, CCC-SLP; Kenneth Staub, MS, CCC-SLP, Clarion University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Previous studies have shown that a second language is most easily acquired through early exposure, immersion and holistic teaching strategies. Direct vocabulary and comprehension instruction embedded within book reading activities has specifically been shown to help children demonstrate significant gains in vocabulary comprehension. This practice of teaching English vocabulary to both native English speakers and English Language Learners has proven extremely beneficial; however, there is very little information available to guide teachers and SLPs in teaching Spanish to English-speaking children. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap by answering the following research questions: First, are the evidence-based strategies for vocabulary breadth that have been found to be effective for teaching English vocabulary equally effective in teaching monolingual English-speaking children Spanish? Second, do receptive vocabulary levels in English have a relationship to target word learning in Spanish? To investigate these questions, five preschoolers were taught Spanish vocabulary three days a week for three weeks. Fifteen target Spanish vocabulary words were taught using evidence-based explicit instruction and joint storybook reading. The children's understanding of 15 control words and the 15 words that were targeted during instruction was measured using researcher-designed picture vocabulary tests. The receptive vocabulary measures were administered before the first week of instruction, at the end of each week of instruction and immediately following the final week of instruction. Findings regarding the children’s word learning and its relationship to initial English vocabulary levels will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe research based vocabulary interventions for children who are learning a different language.
    • Illustrate treatment materials for teaching children Spanish.
    • Describe the outcomes of the given study.

    Speech-Language Pathology Experience in Uganda

    Abigail Julian, BA; Madelynn Ekho, BA; Susan Layton, MS, CCC-SLP, Geneva College

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    In this poster presentation, students will present their summer experience working with an organization that provides speech-language pathology services to children and adults with communication disorders in the country of Uganda. Attendees will learn about what the practice of speech-language pathology looks like in a third-world country, the cultural implications that encompass working as a SLP in a different country and the joy of using our practice as mission.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify multicultural awareness of speech therapy within a third world country.
    • Describe cultural views of disability in Uganda and therefore the need for speech and language therapy in the country.
    • Define speech-llanguage therapy as a mission in a third world country.
    • Describe how the practice of speech and language therapy is done by professional SLPs in Uganda.

    Telerehabilitation for Individuals With Parkinson's Disease: A Critically Appraised Topic

    Karly Stout; Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian College

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    With the increased use of technology in all fields, there has been an increase in the use of telerehabilitation for treating voice disorders. It is important to clinically evaluate the validity of treatment through telerehabilitation various devices. The evidence-based research available for assessing the benefits of telerehabilitation for this clinical population was critically appraised (White, Raghavendra, & McAllister, 2017). Literature was searched for peer-reviewed original research studies that investigated the effect of telerehabilitation on voice production outcomes in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Two randomized-controlled trials (RCTs), one non-randomized controlled trial and one case study were selected from the search results and included in this critically appraised topic. The quality of evidence was assessed using ASHA’s (2007) levels of evidence developed by ASHA’s Advisory Committee on Evidence-Based Practice (Mullen, 2007)

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Assess the quality of EBP support for the provision of LSVT via telerehabilitation for individuals with Parkinson’s Disease.
    • Formulate focused clinical research questions in the area of voice disorders.
    • Summarize the key steps involved in critically appraising the evidence support for a clinical research question.

    The Effect of Aphasia on Syntax: A Critically Appraised Topic

    Julia Sule, BS; Louise Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian College

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    In this critically appraised topic (CAT) paper, the syntactical structure in individuals with aphasia was examined through peer-reviewed articles. The search started with 22,715 articles and was narrowed down to the four articles included. This presentation also examines distinct syntactical differences as related to the different aphasia classifications. Examining syntactic structure is important as it has implications for treatment of individuals with aphasia.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe typical syntactic difficulties experienced by individuals with aphasia.
    • Explain how syntactical difficulties differ based on aphasia classification.
    • Assess how difficulties with syntax may guide treatment decisions.

    The Impact of Acute Care Simulation Training on Student Outcomes

    Erin Clark, MS, CCC-SLP; Emily Miller, BS; Lori Lombard, PhD, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    This poster presentation will analyze the potential benefits of acute care simulation training for graduate students prior to healthcare internship placements. The relationship between this practicum experience and clinical contact hours and clinical self-efficacy will be addressed. In 2017, the authors received an infrastructure grant to fund a medical simulation lab in the university setting. In 2018, the lab was built and a clinical course in acute care simulation was developed. In 2019, the first simulation clinic was offered to SLP graduate students. The course provided computer-based, as well as manikin and live simulations in the acute care lab. The learning experience was scaffolded and immersive. However, the number of clinical hours obtained by the students was less than ten due to certification standards that require a minimum of 25 percent supervision for each student and the large clinic section enrollments of eight to nine students. The benefits of the clinical practicum are not reflected in the contact hour accrual for the clinical course. The authors hypothesized that although contact hour accrual in the simulation clinic was minimal, the potential benefits of increased knowledge, skill and self-efficacy may lead internship supervisors in healthcare settings to allow students to begin accruing contact hours sooner and yield more total hours in adult, health-care service provision. The authors also hypothesized that student perceptions of self-efficacy prior to beginning a full-time internship will increase after acute care simulation training. This presentation will provide data, analysis and interpretation of the aforementioned hypotheses.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify the relationship between prior acute care simulation training and SLP students’ perceptions of self-efficacy before internship experiences.
    • Identify the relationship between acute care simulation training and the onset of obtaining clinical contact hours in those skills at healthcare internship sites.
    • Identify the relationship between acute care simulation training and the total number of clinical contact hours accrued in those skills at healthcare internship sites.

    The Psychosocial Impact of Voice Dissonance in Transgender Individuals

    Afua Agyapong, PhD, Francis Marion University; Jacqueline Jones-Brown, EdD, South Carolina State University; Nia Johnson, EdD, Francis Marion University; Skye Lewis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Francis Marion University; Elijah Nicholas, PhD

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    Transgender individuals report more mental-health issues compared to cisgender individuals. One possible cause of mental stress to this population is their voice. While these individuals do not necessarily have voice disorders, they tend to have vocal qualities they deem inappropriate for their gender (hereafter referred to as voice dissonance), which negatively affects their functional, social and emotional well-being. The few studies that have investigated the impact of voice dissonance on the quality of life of transgender individuals focus solely on male-to-female (MTF) adults. Thus, data on female-to-male (FTM) and gender-nonconforming individuals are lacking. The current study presents comparative data on the psychosocial handicap of voice dissonance on the quality of life of MTF, female-to-male (FTM) or gender nonconforming transgender individuals. Transgender adults’ scores on the Voice Handicap Index (a valid tool used to assess psychosocial handicap of voice disorders) are compared. Findings are discussed taking into account participants’ transition status and social history.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe psychosocial handicap experienced by male-to-female (MTF) transgender adults due to their voice dissonace.
    • Describe psychosocial handicap experienced by female-to-male (FTM) transgender adults due to their voice dissonace.
    • Describe psychosocial handicap experienced by gender-nonconforming transgender adults due to their voice dissonace.
    • Describe how MTF, FTM and gender-conforming transgender adults differ with regards to the psychosocial impacts of voice dissonace on their quality of life.

    Using Music to Facilitate Visual Attention: A Pilot Study

    Katherine Gannon, BS, James Madison University; Kenneth Staub, MS, CCC-SLP, Clarion University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Episodic attention deficits can be detrimental to the daily functioning of typical individuals and are a common symptom of several disorders treated by speech-language pathologists (e.g., TBI/concussion, autism, visual/auditory processing deficits). Research suggests that listening to music has the potential to sharpen an individual’s ability to anticipate events and sustain attention, with increased cortical activity in various areas of the brain noted on fMRI between symphonic movements. The purpose of this multi-faceted study was to therefore examine the impact listening to music had on typical individuals’ ability to complete visual attention tasks. This study was also used to determine if individuals with a musical background demonstrated increased attentional performance after listening to music as compared to those with minimal or no musical background. Further, the investigators examined whether active versus passive listening had any bearing on post-listening attentional performance. Participants completed a timed visual cancellation task to gather baseline information and then briefly listened to music of their choosing at a preferred volume using headphones. Some participants completed a worksheet during the listening task (active listening), while others did not (passive listening). Following the listening task, participants completed another timed visual cancelation task. Data analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in performance of a visual attention task following exposure to music, regardless of the participants’ musical background or whether they engaged in passive or active listening. Results of this pilot study may have implications for the use of music as a means of facilitating increased visual attention behavior.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the potential effect that listening to music might have on an individual’s subsequent completion of a visual attention task.
    • Assess the efficacy of potentially using self-regulated music listening as a facilatory technique in therapy for improving performance on a later occurring visual attention task.
    • Integrate the study’s methodology into clinical trials targeting improved visual attention performance to better establish or refute the approach as a viable treatment strategy.

    Friday, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    Meritorious Poster Session

    Aphasia-Friendly Medication Instructions: Comprehension in Persons With and Without Aphasia

    James Schreiber PhD; Sarah Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP; Elena Donoso-Brown, PhD, OTD, OTR/L; Caterina Staltari, MA, CCC-SLP; Taylor Hopkins; Anna Saylor, BS, Duquesne University

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    Accessible health information supports people to understand and manage chronic medical conditions (e.g., Hubert, Gregory, & Haw, 2018). Most information regarding a person’s care during recovery and rehabilitation is often presented via text, including medication instructions. However, medication instructions are written at reading levels above the average reading level of a neurotypical adult in the United States, likely causing comprehension difficulties, (Cotunga, Vickery, & Carpenter-Haefele, 2005). Comprehension of written health information becomes more difficult for people with language impairments, such as aphasia. Previous research using aphasia-friendly modifications to written materials, such as increased white space and images, has shown positive comprehension outcomes and preference for modifications in persons with aphasia (e.g., Brennan, Worrall, & McKenna, 2005; Rose, Worrall, & McKenna, 2010). Eighteen participants, nine people with aphasia (PWA) and nine people without aphasia (PWoA), participated in this study. Each participant reviewed four medication instructions; two instructions were unmodified, and two instructions were modified using aphasia-friendly modifications. Participants answered 8 multiple choice questions about each instruction and provided their preferences for each instruction condition. Preliminary results of the study reveal increased comprehension in the modified condition for PWA compared to the unmodified condition. Further data analysis is underway. Future research should further examine methods for improving comprehension of health information for people with aphasia.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify examples of aphasia-friendly modifications for written materials
    • Describe comprehension effects for written medication instructions given unmodified versus modified conditions
    • Describe preferences for aspects of written medication instructions in unmodified and modified conditions for persons with and without aphasia

    Comparison of Semantic Space Models for Neuroimaging of Concreteness

    Chaleece Sandberg, PhD, CCC-SLP; Dominick DiMercurio, MS, Pennsylvania State University

    (Level of Instruction: Advanced)

    Word-finding difficulty (anomia) is persistent and ubiquitous in people with aphasia, yet lack of clarity regarding the organization of the mental lexicon stymies attempts to improve anomia therapy. Theories of semantic space posit that the mental lexicon is organized along semantic dimensions, like the extent to which a word’s referent is detected by the senses (concreteness). The role of concreteness in the mental lexicon is supported by evidence of its effects on task performance and localization of function. Clinical research suggests that concrete and abstract words are doubly dissociated. Behavioral psychologists forward the different representational frameworks (DRF) hypothesis, which suggests that concrete and abstract words are organized differently. Meanwhile, computational models allow researchers to test semantic space models (SSMs) using corpus data, which have been shown to predict neuroimaging of concrete nouns (Mitchell et al., 2008). This study applies two different SSMs for both concrete and abstract words to test the DRF hypothesis. The study found that patterns in some regions like bilateral anterior inferior frontal gyrus were congruent with the DRF hypothesis, while other regions like left middle temporal gyrus showed the reverse pattern. Likewise, the study found that patterns also varied by participant. These findings highlight individual variability and differences across brain regions on the organization of the mental lexicon. Future work will investigate whether network models lead to further insight to hone theoretical knowledge, which will enable clinicians to improve treatment for anomia and enhance the quality of life for people with aphasia.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Receive feedback on research, which will aid interpretation of results
    • Network with other researchers, which will help to identify journals for publication
    • Network with speech-language pathologists, which will help to address the applicability of this research
    • View other posters and presentations, which will enhance knowledge more broadly

    Do Emotional, Personal Accounts Affect Perceptions of Stuttering?

    Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University; Quinn Kelley, Misericordia University; Jillian Scanlon, Misericordia University; Faith Foster, Misericordia University; Cara Imbalzano, BS, Misericordia University; Rickson Mesquita, PhD, University of Campinas; Sergio Novi, MS, University of Campinas; Arjun Yodh, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

    (Level of Instruction: Intermediate)

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of typically fluent speakers (TFS) when presented with videos of people discussing positive and negative experiences they had had in relation to their stuttering. This study provides insight into the various outlooks TFS have towards stuttering. To collect data for this study, Mindware Technologies and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) were used. Mindware Technologies was used to assess responses of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) while fNIRS was used to monitor hemoglobin concentration changes in the brain. Pre- and post- baseline data was obtained as participants viewed a blank screen before and after stimuli. Participants watched several emotionally arousing conditions of males and females speaking about the positive and negative effects of stuttering. The videos lasted for 20 seconds each and participants were presented with a 20-second rest between each stimulus to ensure that the data returned to baseline. After ANS and fNIRS data collection, participants completed a survey evaluating their feelings towards the videos and their familiarity with persons who stutter in general. ANS, fNIRS and survey data were compared to determine if there were any correlations. Detailed results and implications for therapy will be discussed at the PSHA Convention.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Analyze how TFS react to watching videos of positive and negative experiences with stuttering.
    • Identify the comfortability levels of TFS when exposed to dysfluent speech.
    • Describe any possible clinical implications the results may implicate.

    EEG Famous Icon Naming Error Prediction in Neurotypical Adults

    Matthew Gombar, BS, The Pennsylvania State University; Chaleece Sandberg, PhD, The Pennsylvania State University; Ellyn Riley, PhD, Syracuse University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    The purpose of this study is aimed at understanding the different naming errors made by healthy older adults in the Tip of the Tongue state. The Tip of the Tongue phenomenon (TOT) is common in patients diagnosed with aphasia, an acquired language disorder after a stroke or brain injury. Research conducted by Burke et al in 1991 defined the TOT as an experience in which an individual has a vague sense of knowing the words, can produce its meaning, but are unable to produce the word. The current study provides insight into the type of naming errors made in neurologically intact older adults and how this compares to persons with aphasia. A range of 704 stimuli of various famous icons were presented via Eprime software for the screening task. Pictures recognized during the screening were randomly divided into six runs for use in four naming sessions. During these sessions, participants were asked to name the famous icons. An image appeared on the screen for 5 seconds and the participant’s response was recorded by the researcher. Scoring software designed for this study was used to identify various semantic and phonological errors made by the participants. The results show that neurotypical adults experience the TOT state in approximately 42% of trials. These results also suggest that the most common error is “no response”, followed by “partially correct”. The results of this study reveal a difference in the type of errors made in the TOT state between neurotypical adults and persons with aphasia.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the Tip of the Tongue State and how it relates to aging.
    • Identify the different semantic and phonological naming errors made during the TOT state.
    • Identify the most common errors made in neurologically intact older adults during the TOT state.
    • Compare naming errors in neurologically intact adults to errors typically seen in persons with aphasia.

    MOOC: A Creative and Effective Way to Disseminate Knowledge Across Disciplines

    Amanda Mahoney, MA; Cara Donohue, MA, CCC-SLP; Jim Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S; Ervin Sejdic, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    Computational deglutition (CD) is a novel discipline bridging health sciences and technology. The goal of the CD team at the University of Pittsburgh is to improve assessment, treatment and quality of life for people with dysphagia through clinical expertise and artificial intelligence. CD is a new field and the emerging research is not easily accessible to most clinicians and is unfamiliar to many researchers. To educate clinicians, engineers and researchers about this important branch of knowledge, we are creating a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). A MOOC is a unique channel for sharing research and providing specialized knowledge to a large group of individuals. MOOCs are (typically) free online classes delivered via multi-media such as video lectures, slideshows and discussion forums. MOOCs are accessible to anyone with internet access, deliver knowledge from leading experts in their field, provide continuing education, offer opportunities for learners to participate in online communities with similar interests and promote innovation. Our target audiences for the CD MOOC are those with general knowledge interests (speech-language pathology and engineering students, professionals and instructors) and clinicians wishing to receive continuing education unit (CEU) credits. The chief concern regarding the CD MOOC is the inherently high attrition rates. We aim to mitigate such high attrition rates by using existing research supported activities and prospective data collection. We plan to enhance future iterations of the CD MOOC based on relevant collected data.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Explain why a MOOC is an ideal way to reach a broad audience.
    • Describe one example of how a MOOC delivers information.
    • Describe one example of how traditional MOOCs can be improved to lower attrition rates.
    • Describe one example of an ideal group of learners for a MOOC.

    NMES Treatment Outcomes for Pediatric Dysphagia Clients

    Anne Richardson; Jessica Kisenwether, PhD, CCC-SLP; Kristy Engemann, MS; Jessica Hanly, BS; Lia Ruggerio, BS; Kasey Weisz, BS; Alexandra Jannson, Misericordia University

    (Level of Instruction: Introductory)

    The purpose of this poster presentation is to examine neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) treatment outcomes for pediatric patients with varying difficulties/diagnoses in an effort to identify trends in oral and/or pharyngeal stage improvement, clinical decision making surrounding the use of NMES as a treatment modality and treatment outcomes as they relate to medical diagnosis and/or duration of treatment. A retrospective chart review was used to gather information to evidence the types of medical diagnoses and swallowing difficulties in which the feeding team recommended the use of NMES, the number of NMES sessions and documented changes in swallowing status. Approximately 25 case studies met the inclusion criteria of an initial swallow evaluation, at least 10 NMES treatment sessions, and a follow-up swallow evaluation. Treatment and evaluation notes written by occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists and registered dietitians in an inpatient/outpatient pediatric hospital were analyzed. Results compare ages, medical diagnoses, initial and follow-up evaluation results and NMES treatment frequency. Identified trends in the demographics of patients, delivery of NMES and outcomes in the physiology of the swallow/quality of life will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe quality of life changes after NMES treatment.
    • Describe differences in the physiology of the swallow after NMES treatment.
    • Describe patient populations that received NMES as a treatment modality and outcomes.

     

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