2024 Convention – Session Descriptions

Wednesday, April 10

6:30 pm-7:30 pm

Session 1 PSHA Town Hall Meeting

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of PSHA Executive Board members to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology, including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs and state licensure requirements. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Audience members will be given an opportunity to ask questions and contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the history of Pennsylvania licensure and certification requirements related to the schools.
  • Identify at least three issues impacting service delivery.
  • List pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

7:30 pm-8:00 pm

Annual Business Meeting

NO CEUs available!

Thursday, April 11

8:00 am-8:30 am

Tech Session 1A Brief Overview of Speech-Language Pathology in China

Guanyu Wei, BA, Moravian University; Aiyun Yuan, MD, Qingdao Women and Children’s Hospital, China; Rujin Tian, MD; Kai Liu, MD, PT, DPT, from University of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Qingdao Hospital (Qingdao Municipal Hospital), Qingdao, China

China is the second-most populous country with a population exceeding 1.4 billion and there were more than 5.2 million people in the United States (US) affiliated themselves with the Chinese culture in 2021. Chinese people are also the largest Asian group in the US. What’s the field of speech-language pathology (SLP) like in China? Upon having eight speech-language pathologists from China to provide feedback and a brief literature search, the authors identified some major challenges and accomplishments in the field of speech-language pathology (SLP) in China. Overall, the field of SLP in China is constantly evolving and growing, with many opportunities for growth and standardization. Given the rapidly aging population in China, it is crucial to establish more structured SLP training programs to meet the growing demand for these services. A comprehensive curriculum that encompasses a diverse array of topics within the domain of SLP is needed. Additionally, researchers are needed to address the considerable research gaps within the SLP field in China. Standardizing the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists in China is necessary to facilitate a better understanding of their roles in various contexts. Thus, establishing a national-level standard or examination is critical to safeguard the welfare of clients seeking SLP services in China. Favorable recommendations and the potential for improvement through the continued endeavors of researchers, clinicians, educators, governments and other related organizations in China were presented. Recommendations for clinicians and researchers in other countries were also included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two or more accomplishments in the field of SLP in China.
  • Describe two or more challenges in the field of SLP in China.
  • List three or more ways clinicians and researchers in the US can help.

Time-Ordered Agenda

8:00 — 8:03 Introduction
8:03 — 8:10 Background
8:10 — 8:20 Themes and findings
8:20 — 8:25 Future directions
8:25 — 8:30 Questions and answers

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

8:00 am-9:30 am

Session 2 Children Who Stutter: Fostering Resilience, Effective Communication and Confidence

Jordan Siegel, MS, CCC-SLP; Joseph Donaher, PhD, CCC-SLP, from CHOP

School-aged children who stutter often push words out or use tactics, like switching words, talking to a rhythm, talking slower, staying quiet or changing word-order to escape from stuttering. These attempts at concealment become more frequent as the perceived consequences of stuttering grow and the individual anticipates negative reactions from others. Unfortunately, attempts to hide stuttering, typically make the individual feel worse and increase social isolation. This can be further magnified when communicative partners speak for them or make comments like: “talk slower,” “think about what you want to say” or “say that again.” It can also be reinforced by speech therapy programs that hold fluency as the primary outcome or show disapproval for stuttering. Children who stutter, regardless of stuttering frequency, are more likely to experience communication-based anxiety, teasing and to avoid communicating with others. The primary focus of therapy, as a result, must encompass more than simply reducing stuttering behaviors. It should include strategies to lessen the negative impact of stuttering through desensitization exercises, exposure tasks and challenging misconceptions about stuttering. It should promote effective communication while resisting the urge to escape or hide from stuttering. The presenters will introduce ways to measure the functional impact of stuttering on the individual, and demonstrate clinical practices focused on increasing communicative effectiveness, reducing emotional reactions to stuttering, challenging unhelpful, negative beliefs and promoting engagement with others. Case studies will demonstrate the lived reality of children who stutter and real-world examples of how to implement the strategies effectively.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Assess stuttering in children from a multi-dimensional perspective based on the functional impact of stuttering on the individual.
  • Identify social challenges faced by school-aged children who stutter, including the negative impact of concealment strategies and the influence of societal reactions to stuttering.
  • Describe therapeutic approaches that extend beyond stuttering reduction and encompass strategies for reducing communication-based anxiety, challenging misconceptions about stuttering and promoting more effective communication.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 3 Enhancing Communication Skills: AAC Strategies for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

Jennifer Bergstrom, EdD, CCC-SLP; Patricia Mayro, MA, CCC-SLP, from Salus University

This presentation aims to equip speech-language pathologists with evidence-based practices for supporting children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) through the implementation of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies. The session will provide a comprehensive overview of CAS, delve into the significance of AAC and offer practical tools and strategies for assessment and intervention. Attendees will gain valuable insights into tailoring interventions to individual client needs, maximizing communication potential and fostering meaningful progress in children with CAS.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate between typical speech development and the characteristics of CAS, identifying key assessment indicators.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in selecting, customizing and implementing appropriate AAC systems and tools for individuals with CAS.
  • Acquire knowledge of evidence-based AAC strategies tailored to the unique needs of children with CAS.
  • Acquire knowledge of evidence-based AAC strategies tailored to the unique needs of children with CAS.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 4Preparing Children With Complex Communication Needs for Adult Social Relationships

Richard Lytton, MS, CCC-SLP; Dave Smith, PhD; Barbara Weber, MS, CCC-SLP, private practice

This presentation will explore practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to equip children and adults with complex communication needs (CCN) to actively participate in meaningful activities and relationships through practical and effective communication. This includes building on personal strengths to enable individuals to acquire Social Communication skills that allow them to access valued natural consequences as well as mutually valued interpersonal interactions. Leuw, et al. (2019) found that “People with intellectual disabilities still experience stigma, discrimination and lack of access to basic services and they are often deprived of meaningful social inclusive activities that give them the chance to network and build significant interpersonal relationships.” Echoing this, a sample of young adults with developmental disabilities in Australia reported that they feel segregated from society at large and that their social interactions were mainly with family and others with disability in formal programs. It has generally been found that, though children with disabilities may have access to well-founded programs and services, they are often ill-equipped as they enter adulthood to effectively participate as valued members of their communities. The presenters will review foundational social and communication skills so that all team members at any stage of intervention can determine and target skills necessary for building social competence. This presentation will conclude with resources for participants to implement the information presented and to provide therapy supports and materials.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify critical skills for intervention when building social connections.
  • Describe ways to enhance opportunities for naturally-occurring authentic communication interactions.
  • Discuss communication skills that will prepare individuals with CCN to actively participate in meaningful activities and relationships as adults.
  • Recognize and minimize the use of dependency-producing professional/caregiver practices.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 5 - ETHICSMaster Class - Your Social Media Clinical Questions Answered! Part 1

Kendrea Garand, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S; James Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, from University of Pittsburgh

Hundreds of diseases impact normal functioning of the nervous system, which can then also impact normal functioning of the swallow mechanism. This presentation will answer clinical questions that were extracted from various social media platforms involving real patients. Topics include cranial nerves, neck surgery, electrical stimulation and more.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define underlying nature of various diseases of the nervous system and their associated sign-symptoms patterns.
  • Describe the mechanisms by which damage to different nervous system components leads to observed sensorimotor impairments.
  • Explain how dysphagia management is dependent upon what component of the nervous system is impaired.

Time-Ordered Agenda:

8-8:05: Intro, disclosures and agenda
8:05-8:30: Case 1: review, discussion and clinical implications
8:30-9:00: Case 2: review, discussion and clinical implications
9:00-9:30: Case 3: review, discussion and clinical implications

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Adult SLP

8:30 am-9:00 am

Tech Session 2 -DEICommunication Partner Training for Traumatic Brain Injury in China

Guanyu Wei, BA; Louise Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Moravian University

Communication Partner Training (CPT) educates people interacting with individuals with communication difficulties to facilitate effective communication. Evidence demonstrates that CPT is an effective strategy for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), but few programs exist, and most are delivered in English. Little-to-no research exists examining the general opinions and potentials of CPT in China or other low- and middle-income countries. To better understand the awareness level and the perspectives (potential benefits and barriers they may encounter) of healthcare professionals and other communication partners (CPs) on CPT for individuals with TBI in China, the authors developed a questionnaire. The questions for the questionnaire were developed with inputs from bilingual Mandarin/English ASHA-certified speech-language pathologists. Respondents could choose to view the questionnaire in either Chinese or English. The survey collected 169 responses from clinicians and 170 responses from other CPs. This presentation is designed to present the study’s discoveries, encompassing the viewpoints of healthcare experts and other communication associates regarding CPT in China. Additionally, it will delve into the degree of awareness, benefits and challenges that surfaced from the wide distribution of this survey across China. The discussion will extend to treatment implications, restrictions and potential avenues for future research.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of CPs and their role in facilitating effective communication for individuals with language disorders caused by TBI.
  • Identify the challenges and opportunities related to communication partner training in China.
  • Discuss future directions and ideas for implementing CPT programs globally.

Time-Ordered Agenda

8:30 — 8:33 Introduction
8:34 — 8:40 Background and research questions
8:41 — 8:45 Method
8:46 — 8:53 Results and discussion
8:54 — 8:55 Limitations and future directions
8:56 — 9:00 Questions and answers

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

9:00 am-9:30 am

Tech Session 3 - DEIThe Co-Treating Relationship: How SLPs and Music Therapists Collaborate

Rachael Shaffer, BABS; Eric Sanders, PhD, CCC-SLP; Louise Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Moravian University

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) often collaborate and co-treat with other health-care professionals. From the perspective of clinicians, this type of interprofessional practice (IPP) is thought to improve outcomes for the clients they serve (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, n.d.). Less is known about IPP in relation to the fields that are not a part of the traditional allied health professions such as Music Therapy (MT). SLPs and MTs work collaboratively with clients across a variety of communication impairments, ages and settings (Geist et al., 2008). However, there are controversial aspects related to this relationship such as billing and clinical responsibilities. Unfortunately, little literature is currently available about this collaboration. Because of the potential clinical benefits of this relationship, the goal of this study is to understand the perspectives and experiences of SLPs who have co-treated with MTs. Eleven SLPs who have co-treated with MTs within the past five years participated in semi-structured interviews focused on their collaboration. Topics that were discussed included what the collaboration was like, how often this collaboration occurred and if there were any conflicts during their experiences together. Applied Thematic Analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) is being used to analyze transcripts of these interviews in order to identify key components of this collaboration. Results will be discussed relative to clinical applications and implications for future collaborations between SLPs and MTs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the potential benefits of collaboration with MTs.
  • Identify challenges regarding the collaboration with MTs.
  • Identify what knowledge SLPs have regarding the duties, responsibilities and training of MTs.

Time-Ordered Agenda:

5 minutes—Introductions and Disclosures
15 minutes—Presentation of Study
10 minutes—Question and Answer

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

10:00 am-10:30 am

Tech Session 4 Breathing New Life Into Speech Therapy

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP; Jacob Thomas; Stephanie Maines; Alexandra Long, from Misericordia University

Breath Cycle (Barone & Tellis, 2018) is a concept that utilizes airflow management and semi-occluded vocal tract principles to pattern speech with breathing, as well as regulate airflow rate for phonation. The Voice and Speech Science Lab at Misericordia University has utilized Breath Cycle when treating individuals with a myriad of voice disorders including inducible laryngeal obstruction (ILO), individuals with fluency disorders including cluttering and stuttering, as well as individuals with motor speech disorders. Breath Cycle requires conscious attention to breathing. Clinicians instruct clients to quickly exhale through pursed lips like they are blowing out a match. This exhale takes the person to resting expiratory level, the level reached at the end of a tidal volume exhale before a tidal volume inhalation. The person then quickly slurps in with a high tongue position and spread lips. Then the person is instructed to count in pairs of two, exhale quickly with pursed lips and then slurp in. The process continues until the individual reaches 10. This study includes five clients who utilized Breath Cycle in voice therapy. Most clients were diagnosed with post-viral vagal neuropathy and/or ILO. All participants have pre- and post-therapy data. The trends include an increase in quality of life measurements and changes in mental and physical effort. Specific techniques will be discussed during the presentation. The presentation will also discuss semi-occluded vocal tract principles (e.g., rescue breathing), airflow rate management and specific physiological voice components the clinicians addressed during therapy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the principles of breath cycle.
  • Explain the effects breath cycle has during therapy on different communication disorders.
  • Discuss how restrictive breathing techniques and traditional breathing instruction differ from Breath Cycle.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

10:00 am-11:30 am

Session 6 A Guide to Best Practices in Real Word Clinical Settings

Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College; Erin E.G. Lundblom, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh; Robert W. Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, Salus University

Speech-language pathologists should utilize evidence-based practices based on current research, patient/client perspectives and clinical knowledge. Staying current in demanding clinical environments can be overwhelming. This session will provide practitioners with practical resources and strategies to find current evidence and best practices. The session will also include case scenarios to practice applying the resources.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Practically explain how to utilize best practices.
  • Identify at least easily accessible sources to evidence.
  • Discuss the importance of utilizing current best practices in clinical settings.
  • Discuss how to utilize resources using specific case studies.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 7Master Class - Become a Speech Sound Detective to Improve Your Students' Performance

Lissa Power-deFur, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, Longwood University

Speech-language pathologists are often frustrated by their students’ slow progress in remediating speech sound disorders. This session will refresh participants’ skills in articulation and phonology, updating their skills in identifying and analyzing phonetic and phonologic disorders. The session will include a detailed overview of best practices in assessment of speech sound disorders. Use of assessment data for determining eligibility for services, target selection and goal writing will be addressed. The session will conclude with an overview of effective goal writing.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Analyze phonetic and phonologic speech sound errors.
  • Identify elements of a comprehensive speech sound disorder assessment.
  • Identify intervention targets that will yield the greatest progress.
  • Write intervention goals that are measurable, achievable and relevant.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 8Strategies That Worked for Teens With Selective Mutism: Case Reviews

Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL; Cesar Ruiz, SLPD, CCC-SLP, from La Salle University; Louis Chesney, BS, RethinkCare

This presentation focuses on an older population of children with challenging symptoms of selective mutism. Selective mutism is listed as an anxiety disorder in the DSM-5-TR (American Psychiatric Association, 2022). For these children there is a consistent failure to speak in specific social situations in which there is an expectation to speak such as at school despite their speaking in other situations where they feel more comfortable. Difficulties with social interactions and communication do not typically begin in the teenage years. The onset of selective mutism usually begins before five years old but doesn’t come to clinical attention until school when social communication and verbal expectations such as reading aloud are expected. Teenagers with selective mutism typically present with more avoidance and greater symptomatology which makes treatment more challenging for clinicians. In this presentation, we present two cases of teenagers. The purpose of this session is to share case reviews and an account of our systematic treatment that supported the teens’ transitions from being mute to speaking in group settings. Using knowledge about triggers to minimize the teens’ mutism (Schwenck, et al., 2021), we address specific strategies including parent involvement, the individual’s desire for change, teletherapy using computer controls and a focus on the physiology of anxiety related to the speech mechanism to engage in activities that progress the teens from voice initiation to conversation (Muris & Ollendick, 2021; Ruiz, et al., 2022).

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three characteristics of teens with selective mutism.
  • Describe three strategies used in the treatment of teens with selective mutism.
  • List three triggers that often increase selective mutism in teens.
  • Describe three outcomes of teletherapy in the treatment of teens with selective mutism.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 9 - ETHICSMaster Class - Your Social Media Clinical Questions Answered! Part 2

Kendrea Garand, PhD, CCC-SLP; James Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, from University of Pittsburgh

Hundreds of diseases impact normal functioning of the nervous system, which can then also impact normal functioning of the swallow mechanism. This presentation will answer clinical questions that were extracted from various social media platforms involving real patients. Topics include cranial nerves, neck surgery, electrical stimulation and more.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define underlying nature of various diseases of the nervous system and their associated sign-symptoms patterns.
  • Describe the mechanisms by which damage to different nervous system components leads to observed sensorimotor impairments.
  • Explain how dysphagia management is dependent upon what component of the nervous system is impaired.

Time-Ordered Agenda:

10-10:05: Intro, disclosures and agenda
10:05-10:30: Case 4: review, discussion and clinical implications
10:30-11:00: Case 5: review, discussion and clinical implications
11:00-11:30: Case 6: review, discussion and clinical implications

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Adult SLP

10:30 am-11:00 am

Tech Session 5 - DEIFinding Your Voice: A Gender Affirming Case Study

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Stephanie Maines; Jacob Thomas; Alexandra Long, from Misericordia University

Speech-language pathologists (SLP) play a crucial role in providing service to the transgender and queer communities through gender-affirming voice care. A voice not consistent with one’s gender identity can result in a poor quality of life and attract unwanted attention (ASHA). SLPs can safely and effectively modify a client’s voice and assist them in achieving desired outcomes. This study presents the case of a 37-year-old female who transitioned from male-to-female and is receiving voice therapy. Her chief complaint upon evaluation was dysphoria related to voice production characterized by lower than typical fundamental frequency. Strategies utilized in therapy included airflow rate management, vocal flexibility exercises (i.e., singhales and sirens) and voice modification utilizing the Estill Voice Model and motor learning principles. Pre-therapy videostroboscopic data revealed bilateral erythema, left true vocal fold paresis and atrophy, anterior-posterior squeeze, false vocal fold constriction and asymmetrical arytenoid movement during adduction and abduction. Pre-therapy acoustic data showed elevated jitter and shimmer levels, indicating an inconsistency with vocal fold vibration during sustained phonation on a vowel. Acoustic data also revealed her fundamental frequency as lower than a typical female voice. The patient demonstrated difficulty changing frequencies throughout the evaluation. Aerodynamic measurements reflected low mean peak air pressure values when speaking quietly and loudly. This finding indicates decreased vocal fold closure during adduction. Data also showed increased airflow measures during loud speech indicating difficulty with adduction and compensation through increased airflow. Post-therapy data will be analyzed by the time of the convention.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the process to identify client’s voice that affirms their identity.
  • Assess they ways to achieve the voice that affirms their identity.
  • Explain the approach of achieving the voice that affirms their identity.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

11:00 AM-11:30 AM

Tech Session 6 Managing Behavioral Disturbance in Individuals With Dementia

Alaina Gotwalt, MS, CCC-SLP, Fox Rehabilitation

This technical session is designed as a presentation for intermediate speech-language pathologists working with the older adult population in senior-living communities or home health settings. Discussion will include instruction on various behavioral disturbances in individuals with dementia, as well as factors affecting negative behaviors. Research suggests that simple, nonpharmacological interventions can have a positive impact on behaviors such as agitation, combativeness and anxiety in patients with dementia (Whear, R., Abbott, R., et al., 2014).This presentation will include a summary of current research supporting clinical approaches and evidence-based practice in individuals with dementia and behavioral disturbance. The presenter will discuss strategies and techniques to facilitate navigating challenging behaviors in patients with dementia. Caregiver training techniques will be provided, as well as instruction on incorporating person-centered care in this population. Participants will learn techniques that can be applied immediately in their clinical settings and will be given resources to provide evidence for their clinical reasoning to educate staff/family members and advocate for effective patient care.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least one strategy to appropriately approach a patient with dementia with behavioral disturbance.
  • Identify at least three factors impacting negative behaviors in people with dementia.
  • Identify opportunities and challenges in treating individuals with dementia and behavioral disturbance.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

11:30 am-1:00 pm

Poster Presentations

11:45 am-12:45 pm

Session 10 Finding Your Path: Transitioning From Student to Clinician

Ali Lewandowski, MA, CCC-SLP; Brittany Coleman, MS, CCC-SLP, from University of Pittsburgh

This session is dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students who are striving to become clinicians/researchers in the field of speech-language pathology or audiology. From applying to graduate programs to finding the right clinical fellowship, there is a lot to consider and balance during this transformative time in your life. While your institutions are preparing you academically and clinically, you may find yourself feeling lost when it comes to topics beyond the classroom such as establishing mentorship, the “how-tos” of networking and finding your own unique voice as a future clinician. This session will also allow for discussion and facilitated group brainstorming activities to navigate those stressors, concerns and “afraid to ask” questions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify strategies to ease the transition from student to clinician.
  • Differentiate between role as a student clinician versus clinical fellow.
  • Evaluate personal goals and timeline to create an individual definition of success.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 11 - DEIIncorporating Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility Into Practice: Lunch-and-Learn Session

Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian University; Laura Sibbald, MA, CCC-SLP, Chestnut Hill College; Lisa Bedore, PhD, CCC-SLP, Temple University; Patricia Swasey Washington, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility (DEIA) is a crucial topic that impacts all facets of society, including audiology and speech-language pathology. In this lunch and learn session, organized by the PSHA DEIA Committee, we will focus on the significance of DEIA principles in audiology and speech-language pathology and how they affect patient outcomes, provider effectiveness and professional standards. We will use case studies and group discussions to emphasize the importance of DEIA principles for SLPs and audiologists. Additionally, we will provide a comprehensive overview of the resources available at the state and national organization levels to assist professionals in successfully implementing DEIA practices.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Examine DEIA (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility) principles as they relate to audiology and speech-language pathology, emphasizing the importance of these principles in patient care and educational support.
  • List key resources and tools for audiologists and speech-language pathologists to enhance their DEI initiatives.
  • Discuss the steps taken by the DEIA Committee to move DEIA initiatives forward at the state level and how PSHA members can get involved

Time-Ordered Agenda:

  • Introduction to DEIA – 10 mins
  • Importance of DEIA – 15 mins
  • Case study/ group discussion – 20 mins
  • Resources and efforts of the DEIA committee – 10 mins
  • Q & A – 5 mins

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

1:00 pm-1:30 pm

Tech Session 7Improvement Science: A Roadmap to Achieving Quality Outcomes in Healthcare

Carla Maiolini, MA, CCC-SLP, UPMC

The landscape of health care is rapidly evolving, and leaders are bombarded by the pressure to keep pace by effectively implementing new and efficient processes to achieve better outcomes. Identifying a need for improvement can be easy, but understanding where to begin to implement change can be a challenge and strategic planning is necessary to ensure success in quality and process improvement. Improvement science is a methodology framework that guides change through rapid and iterative tests of change to make effective and measurable improvements. It can be used to improve the patient experience, but also has benefits to staff by addressing ineffective processes and antiquated workflows. Multiple improvement methodologies exist including the Model for Improvement, Lean and Six Sigma. This presentation will focus on helping leaders and change agents understand how to implement the Model for Improvement methodology in various healthcare settings to engage and lead change. The Model for Improvement comes from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), one of the earliest groups doing systematic healthcare improvement. The Model for Improvement frames a project with three questions: What are we trying to accomplish? How will we know a change is an improvement? What changes can we make that will result in improvement? Real examples from a large integrated delivery and finance system will be shared from various clinical settings to elucidate the opportunities in making impactful change and improving outcomes, both small and large with this framework.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify steps to conduct iterative tests of change.
  • Articulate why improvement science is valuable in healthcare outcome management.
  • Demonstrate knowledge in the design and execution of an improvement project, including an aim, measures and tests of change.
  • Outline strategies for leaders to utilize in supporting staff with change.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

1:00 pm-2:30 pm

Session 12 Inter-Professional Practice/Education for Dysphagia Care-Outcomes from Clinical Research Case Studies

Akila Rajappa, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania; Panayiota Senekkis-Florent, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, Duquesne University; Kristie Soriano, MS, CCC-SLP, Hackensack Meridian Health; Rachel Wolf, PhD, CCC-SLP, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania; Georgia Malandraki, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, Purdue University

Inter-professional education (IPE) and inter-professional practice (IPP) are increasingly becoming an inevitable component of clinical research, practice and education in healthcare-based speech-language pathology, specifically in dysphagia care across the life continuum. This seminar will highlight the relevance of the IPE/IPP in achieving successful inter-professional collaborations between communication sciences and disorders (CSD) training programs, hospitals and community health partners to advance dysphagia research, education and practice. Perspectives depicting three case studies (pediatrics, adults and older adults) that involve real-life teams, patients and students, supported by data driven outcomes will be presented by the CSD faculty and community health partners. Benefits and future directions of the use of IPP/IPE as an important contributor to best dysphagia clinical practice, education and research will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define the general characteristics of IPE/IPP and its relevance to dysphagia care.
  • Discuss the implications of IPE/IPP for dysphagia research, education and practice in the context of hospitals and community healthcare partners.
  • Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to work as an effective team member in an inter-professional collaborative environment.
  • Apply the benefits of IPE/IPP to generate better clinical and research outcomes for clinicians, patients, graduate students and researchers.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 13Master Class - The Case for Dynamic Coaching: It’s Not About Workbooks

Donald L MacLennan, MA, CCC-SLP, Minneapolis VA Health Care System

Cognitive rehabilitation (CR) for traumatic brain injury in the United States emerged in the early 1970s. Initial efforts were predicated on the notion that molecular components of cognition (sequencing, organization, etc.) could be modified through drill and practice in ways that would result in improvement in functional real-world activities. This approach became known as the ‘restorative’ approach in contrast to the ‘compensatory’ approach that focused on implementation of practical strategies to facilitate success in real-world activities. Furthermore, the biomedical model of medical care that dominated the health care system at the time posited that clients were passive participants in therapies with clinicians in charge of all aspects of rehabilitation. This approach has come to be called the ‘traditional rehabilitation’ approach and is still in use in many clinics today. We now know the distinction between restorative and compensatory treatments is a false dichotomy. Furthermore, expert opinion and emerging research demonstrate that CR works best when clients are actively engaged in the clinical decision-making process and therapy focuses on functional, real-world activities that are meaningful to the client. This portion of the workshop will outline the fundamental weaknesses of drill-oriented workbook therapy and describe a limited ‘mindfulness approach to workbook-supported CR’ that is more consistent with a functional, client-centered therapy approach.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify two foundational assumptions used as a rationale for drill-oriented workbook therapy.
  • Identify five factors that undermine the validity of using drill-oriented workbooks for CR.
  • Demonstrate understanding of a ‘mindfulness approach to workbooks’ that may allow for limited use of workbooks in a functionally-oriented approach to CR.
  • Illustrate guiding principles for a Direct Treatment approach to improving attentional skills using a drill and practice approach.

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Adult SLP

Session 14 - ETHICSMaster Class - Vibrant Assessment Techniques That Support Special Education Eligibility Determination

Lissa Power-deFur, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, Longwood University

Eligibility for speech-language services in schools must adhere to the federal special education requirements. This session begins with an explanation of IDEA requirements, including eligibility criteria, use of standardized/non-standardized assessments and classroom observations and team decision-making. Best practices in assessment processes will be discussed, with a focus on selecting appropriate standardized assessments and supplementing these with other, evidence-based practices. These practices provide SLPs and the eligibility teams with data to draw conclusions regarding the educational impact of the speech-language impairment and make decisions regarding eligibility. As students from certain racial-ethnic groups have been disproportionately represented in special education, the session will include strategies to prevent disproportionality. The ethical principles related to assessment and eligibility determine will be infused throughout the presentation. The session will conclude with a discussion of practices to conclude a student’s eligibility for special education.

Time-Ordered  Agenda:

5-minutes: Introduction, overview, learning objectives
15-minutes: Overview of IDEA requirements assessment and eligibility requirements
5-minutes: Our ethical obligations when completing assessments
15-minutes: Assessment components:  standardized and non-standardized assessments
Selecting assessments
5-minutes: Classroom observations and artifacts
10-minutes: “Adverse educational impact” – how do we meet both ethical and regulatory requirements?
10-minutes: What is disproportionality and why does it occur?
10-minutes: Conducting assessments and eligibility deliberations to prevent disproportionality and maintain ethical standards
10-minutes: Preparing for dismissal – a child who is no longer eligible
5-minutes: Wrap-up

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Select and administer assessments that lead to more informed special education eligibility decisions.
  • Connect assessment data with education standards to document adverse educational impact.
  • Explain potential causes of disproportionate eligibility determination of students from diverse racial-ethnic backgrounds.
  • List three strategies to use when planning for dismissal.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 15Voice and Message Banking: Update on Current Voice Preservation Strategies

Amy Lustig, MA, Med, PhD, CCC-SLP, Salus University

As a result of illness, injury or effects of medical intervention, some of our clients face substantial changes to — or full loss of — their speaking voice. Individuals in these situations may have an interest in preserving their natural voice for future communication purposes. “Voice preservation” is an umbrella term representing the act of capturing one’s current speaking voice in recorded form, with the intent to utilize it for communication purposes at a later date. There are currently two main approaches to voice preservation: voice banking and message banking. Voice banking refers to the creation of a synthesized voice that approximates, though is not typically identical to, the speaker’s natural voice. When completed, the banked voice may be used through text-to-speech (TTS) programs and applications that are compatible with a variety of AAC devices, tablets and cell phones. Alternatively, message banking refers to recording comments in the user’s natural voice that represent personally-relevant communications such as requests for assistance, favorite expressions, laughter and other vocalized expressions unique to the individual and conversation starters. Banked messages are also used through TTS solutions for communication purposes, and will sound exactly as they did at the time they were created. This presentation is designed to provide detailed descriptions of current voice preservation options, including the specific steps involved in each process, the client populations likely to benefit from these activities, and how banked voices and messages can be used at a practical level. Demonstrations of voice and message banking will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe options for voice preservation (voice and message banking), and how they differ from one another.
  • Describe strategies for completing voice and message banking.
  • Select output solutions for utilizing banked voices and messages.
  • Consider appropriate populations for whom voice preservation options could be offered.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

1:30 pm-2:00 pm

Tech Session 8 - ETHICS The Pennsylvania Department of State, Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs Disciplinary Process and Common Violations Relating to The State Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Dana Wucinski, JD; Paul Jarabeck, JD, from Pennsylvania Department of State

This presentation will focus on the disciplinary process for violations of the Act or regulations of the State Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology including information on the complaint process, investigations, the filing of official charges, hearings and possible disciplinary sanctions. This presentation will also take a look at common violations under the Board’s Act and regulations and provide the audience with where information on where to find their Act and regulations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Learn the disciplinary process.
  • Know where to find their Act and regulations.
  • Learn common violations and how to avoid them.
  • Learn how to file a complaint.

Time-Ordered Agenda

5 min.    Complaints/Investigation
5 min.    Prosecution Process
5 min.    Hearing Process               
5 min.    Board Review
5 min.    Appellate Process
5 min.    Q&A

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

2:00 pm-2:30 pm

Tech Session 9 - DEILGBTQ+ People Who Stutter: Managing Multiple Stigmas and Social Identities

James Mancinelli, PhD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University

This study surveyed LGBTQ+ people who stutter (hereafter LGBTQ+PWS). The purpose of the study was to investigate identity centrality, identity salience, anticipated stigma and cultural stigma (Quinn & Chaudoir, 2015) in this population. LGBTQ+PWS are a multiply stigmatized population and decisions about presenting a social identity at the intersection of two stigmatizing attributes can be very complicated as a result (Javaid, 2019; Remedios & Snyder, 2015). Those decisions can have social, occupational, psychological, financial and therapeutic implications. For example, the support group “Passing Twice” was started in response to the needs of LGBTQ+ people who stutter. Participants can openly discuss their lives as LGBTQ+PWS. This group is active on social media and at stuttering conferences such as the National Stuttering Association (NSA) Conference. Its existence suggests that managing the information about one’s social identity as LGBTQ+ and as a PWS is complicated by its duality. The goal of this research is to develop more informed assessment processes, and treatment programming for LGBTQ+PWS which considers their multiple stigmatized status in society. The research questions were: Is living at the intersection of identities as an LGBTQ+ PWS in society central and salient to their self-concept? Do the participants anticipate personal and cultural stigmatization associated with their dual social identities as a PWS and as a member of the LGBTQ+ community (Quinn & Chaudoir, 2015; Sellers et al., 1998)?

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe identity centrality and identity salience.
  • Describe anticipated stigma and cultural stigma.
  • Describe the importance of multiple stigmas and social identities in people who stutter.
  • Describe how multiple stigmas and social identities can inform assessment and treatment planning in LGBTQ+ people who stutter.

Time-Ordered Agenda

2 minutes—Introductions and Disclosures
10 minutes—Overview and Background
12 Minutes—Presentation of Data/Results/Discussion
6 minutes—Conclusion and Wrap-Up

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Multi-Interest

3:00 pm-3:30 pm

Tech Session 10Let’s Echo Back: A Discussion About Autistic Children and Echolalia

Chantal Whiteduck, MS, CCC-SLP, Moravian University

Echolalia and gestalt language processing have become a “hot topic” on social media when considering speech therapy for autistic children (ASHA, n.d.; Blanc, 2012; Meaningful Speech, n.d.; Zachos, 2023). While not a new topic to speech-language pathology (Prizant, 1982, 1983; Prizant & Duchan, 1981; Prizant & Rydell, 1984; Stiegler, 2015), the idea of autism and gestalt language development has gained more traction and sparked many conversations in recent years. Though echolalia has been previously described as meaningless utterances, it is now being described as a meaningful way to communicate (Cohn et al., 2023; Stiegler, 2015). These new considerations have opened the door for discussion about understanding therapy from a neurodiversity affirming lens and the language SLPs use when treating autistic individuals (Bottema-Beutel et al., 2021; Laurent & Fede, 2021; Randall, 2021). As the conversation continues, these findings often leave practicing SLPs with many questions. How can SLPs best support autistic children and their communication skills? What is child-led therapy and neurodiversity affirming practices? What should SLPs do when their client uses echolalia as the primary mode of communication? This presentation seeks to discuss current findings in the literature on gestalt language processing and its role in the acquisition of language in autistic children. Neurodiversity affirming practices and child-led therapy will also be discussed and applied to case studies of children who primarily use echolalia.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the current literature for speech therapy for autistic children, gestalt language processing and neurodiversity affirming practices.
  • Explain the treatment interventions currently recommended and used for autistic clients.
  • Explain neurodiversity affirming practices and child-led therapy.
  • Discuss the application of child-led therapy and Natural Language Acquisition framework when working with autistic children.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Tech Session 11Why Counseling is Important in Speech-Language Pathology and How to do it Effectively

Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Stephanie Maines; Jacob Thomas; Alexandra Long, from Misericordia University

Counseling in speech-language pathology has grown in importance over the past 10 years, with counseling becoming an ASHA special interest group in 2022 (SIG 20). The role of counseling is integral in speech-language pathology. The models that integrate counseling into assessment and treatment aid the therapy process. For example, The Solution Cycle® (Tellis and Barone, 2018), rooted in solution-focused counseling, incorporates counseling skills and therapy goals into a four-step process. This practical, four-step, nonlinear, leadership model represents an inclusive interviewing and counseling process. Understanding the five Intentions of Communication is an essential step in The Solution Cycle® and maintaining the client’s autonomy. Helping the client identify and understand their communicative intentions is essential to building and maintaining motivation. Motivation is composed of purpose, ownership and growth. Models and skills necessary for conducting effective counseling include internal family systems theory, compassionate communication and aspects of diversity, equity and inclusion. Internal family systems is an evidence-based psychotherapy model that directly applies to the treatment process. This model states that individuals have multiple internal parts, or characteristics, including emotions. Strong emotions like grief, shame and stigma have an immense effect on therapy. Likewise, clinician bias via transformative learning can make therapy more individual, equitable and inclusive. Understanding emotions and compassionate communication provides the clinician with essential skills in effective interactions with clients. Exploring these theories and providing instruction on how to approach emotions surrounding grief, difficult decisions, ethics and cultural humility and competency will improve clinician interactions with clients and caregivers.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define counseling.
  • Explain the counseling process and its role in speech-language pathology.
  • State the skills necessary for an effective counselor.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

3:00 pm-4:30 pm

Session 16Co-Teaching in School Settings: What, Why and How

Emily Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, Colonial IU 20/East Stroudsburg University; LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP, East Stroudsburg University

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s Scope of Practice for Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) calls on SLPs to engage in collaboration. Collaboration involves problem solving and mutual goal setting from multiple perspectives that are relevant to an individuals needs (Idol, Nevin, & Paolucci-Whitcomb, 1994). One way that SLPs can engage in collaboration in the school setting is through co-teaching methods. Co-teaching can be implemented with regular education teachers, special education teachers and/or other service providers in order to enhance the intervention that students are receiving. There are several benefits to this practice including that students benefit from increased knowledge and experience from all involved professionals and there are more opportunities for functional generalization of skills and carryover across settings. This presentation will review the evidence-based benefits of co-teaching. The authors will share their experiences with co-teaching in various ways and discuss different models of co-teaching that can be used in the school setting. The presenters will provide a “how to” for SLPs looking to implement co-teaching as part of their own practice, including steps to implementation and suggested activities and resources. The authors will review preliminary data from a recent co-teaching study conducted with an SLP and a regular education Kindergarten teacher in a public elementary school. Time will be allotted for questions from the audience.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe benefits of co-teaching in school settings.
  • Describe four different co-teaching models.
  • List steps to implement a co-teaching model.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 17Professional Roundtable Discussions

Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, Pennsylvania Western University

These roundtables provide an opportunity to discuss contemporary issues and trends with colleagues from across the state. Each table will have a facilitator and specific topic relating to: health care, schools, higher education, supervision, clinical fellowship, career advancement and development and more. Attendees can circulate to various tables of interest. This is a great networking opportunity for professionals, early career practitioners and students!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and discuss relevant issues facing professionals in specific work settings.
  • Identify and discuss emerging trends in clinical practice.
  • Identify and discuss opportunities for collaboration with colleagues across the state.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 18Master Class - The Case for Dynamic Coaching: Motivation is Key

Donald MacLennan, MA, CCC-SLP, Minneapolis VA Health Care System

When therapy ‘fails,’ clinicians frequently attribute poor outcomes to a lack of motivation on the part of the client. Motivation is typically thought of as a product of strength, i.e., the strength of will to persist in challenging activities. However, Self-Determination Theory (SDT) posits that motivation exists on a continuum based on the quality of motivation. In SDT the qualities of motivation describe the degrees of internalization, with highest levels of internalization seen when clients are free to make choices in therapy that align with their internal values and beliefs. Motivation is influenced by the psychological need for autonomy (capacity to choose activities aligning with values and beliefs), competence (the belief that one is self-effective) and relatedness (the degree to which they feel they are supported and respected by others). These needs are universal and, when met, result in feelings of well-being, a foundational goal of the Whole Health movement. How we communicate with clients has a profound impact on the motivation of the clients we work with. Motivational Interviewing (MI) provides clinicians with a “collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication … designed to strengthen personal motivation for and commitment to a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion. “Specific interview techniques pertaining to MI will be presented and video examples of MI used in clinical goal setting will be reviewed and discussed. Clinical examples pertain to TBI, however, principles of SDT and MI are relevant to all clients seen by SLPs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Develop a basic understanding of principles of Self-Determination Theory which serves as a foundational basis for the use of MI in a clinical setting
  • Identify basic skills involved in MI.
  • Observe and discuss use of MI in video examples of clinical interviews.
  • Practice MI skills if time permits.

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Adult SLP

Session 19Virtual Reality and Discourse Abilities of Aging Veterans

Mary Sears, SLPD, CCC-SLP; Kimberly Eichhorn, MS, CCC-SLP, from VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System

Maintaining connectedness through discourse level communication and storytelling can assist with aging adults’ engagement and quality of life. With potential changes to lexical access and cohesion, effective discourse exchanges among aging adults and their communication partners can be negatively impacted. The use of advancing technologies, such as virtual reality (VR), provide the opportunity for cognitive-language stimulation for adults, particularly those in an institutional setting. Practice with discourse around a shared immersive experience has the potential to increase initiation, content and frequency of discourse interaction. This presentation will highlight a pilot clinical improvement treatment program currently taking place in a community living center with veterans receiving long-term care. The program aims to stimulate narrative generation and development as well as communication initiation through the immersive VR. Residents complete a pre-treatment evaluation which includes a cognitive-communication screening, story retell and comprehension task, speech sample and conversation prompt. A brief survey regarding perceived effectiveness of communication is completed by a facility staff member. Responses are scored using the Language Underpins Narrative in Aphasia Discourse Analysis Protocol-Clinical. Following eight, 30-minute treatment sessions baseline measures were repeated. Four residents completed the trial protocol to date. Data analysis of discourse samples is in progress. Anecdotal evidence this pilot suggests that this treatment modality helps to focus more verbose participants on a specific topic, reduces tangentiality and promotes appropriate conversational engagement and turn-taking. For participants with limited verbal output, it elicits the production of narrative words in a conversational context, a strong supplement to structured therapy tasks.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize potential VR applications for targeting conversational skills in aging adults.
  • Describe the basic principles of discourse analysis using the clinical adaptation of the Language Underpins Narrative in Aphasia (LUNA).
  • Paraphrase a clinical protocol for implementation of VR treatment interventions.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

3:30 pm-4:00 pm

Tech Session 12Integrating Socially Assistive Robotics Into Speech-Language Pathology Intervention

Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP; Kara Thourot; Michaela Raub; Sara Lombardi; Mia Mercatili; Cecilia Heidelberger, BS; Rebecca Rehrey, BS; Lori Cimino, MS, CCC-SLP; Adina Rosenthal, MS, CCC-SLP; Melissa Alunni, MS, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University

Socially Assistive Robotics (SAR) is an emerging area of study that has been adapted to the field of speech-language pathology to aid in the treatment of language and social interaction. Preliminary findings suggest that SAR can help improve emotional regulation, collaboration, imitation, joint attention and turn-taking skills in children with autism spectrum disorder (Amirabdollahian et al., 2014; Ang et al., 2013; Costa et al., 2015; Sani-Bozkurt & Bozkus-Genc, 2020; Wood et al., 2019), as well as aid in teaching sign language, reading and literacy skills (Van Den Berghe et al., 2018). This project explores the implementation of SAR in speech therapy sessions, which is a relatively new research area in the field of speech-language pathology, and seeks to expand on the limited research regarding the effectiveness of SAR in treatment sessions. Researchers will use an emergent coding method to qualitatively analyze SAR speech therapy sessions conducted by student clinicians at Misericordia University Speech-Language and Hearing Center. In this setting, clinicians are applying SAR technology in treatment sessions with clients ranging from two to 18 with various diagnoses affecting communication, including language disorders, autism spectrum disorder, fluency disorders and speech sound disorders. This presentation will include a literature review regarding the use of SAR historically and qualitative data, including observed facilitators and barriers to the use of SAR within a clinical setting. The results of this study will inform clinicians interested in integrating SAR within the field of speech-language pathology, as well as expand the body of clinical research on SAR.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize previous findings regarding the use of Socially Assistive Robotics in speech-language pathology sessions.
  • Assess facilitators and barriers to utilizing socially assistive technology in speech-language pathology sessions.
  • Identify future directions of the application of socially assistive robotics in clinical settings.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Tech Session 13 - WITHDRAWNThe Importance of Prioritizing Neuromuscular Re-Education With Lateral Medullary Stroke

Madeleine Foley, MS, CCC-SLP, Jacobi Medical Center

Lateral Medullary Syndrome (LMS), also known as Wallenberg Syndrome, refers to a condition arising from occlusion of the posterior inferior cerebral artery or vertebral artery. This stroke frequently affects cranial nerve nuclei that make up much of the Central Pattern Generator for the pharyngeal swallow, resulting in severe and occasionally life-threatening dysphagia. SLP involvement in the management and education of these individuals, as well as education of the interdisciplinary team, is crucial. Despite the known existence of this condition and SLPs understanding of swallowing neurophysiology, individuals with LMS remain a misunderstood patient population. Prognosis for return to PO diet is generally good following dysphagia intervention, however, it is important for clinicians to familiarize themselves with the pathophysiology and the implications of the neural damage associated with LMS prior to initiating dysphagia therapy. This presentation provides an overview of motor learning principles and concepts including experience-dependent plasticity in the context of dysphagia rehabilitation for LMS and encourages SLPs to consider the whole swallow, and the whole patient, in order to maximize rehabilitation time and assist patients in their return to an oral diet.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of the medulla as it pertains to swallowing.
  • List three features of Lateral Medullary Syndrome.
  • Define motor learning in the context of dysphagia therapy.
  • List three methods for promoting experience-dependent plasticity in dysphagia therapy for patients with LMS.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

4:00 pm-4:30 pm

Tech Session 14Perspectives of AAC Specialty Certification From School-Based AAC Specialists

Eric Sanders, PhD, CCC-SLP; Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Moravian University; Thomas Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, The University of North Carolina – Greensboro

Over 70 percent of SLPs that work in schools serve students who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) (ASHA, 2022). Unfortunately, many SLPs employed in schools express low confidence in areas related to service provision (Sanders et al., 2021). For these types of reasons, school-districts often employ SLPs who specialize in AAC to aid in providing services. Although these SLPs have many responsibilities in schools there is no uniformity across districts related to these responsibilities. Recently, the American Board of AAC has proceeded through the process of developing speciality certification for SLPs across all work settings. This certification is not without controversy for many reasons including the belief that generalists can provide appropriate AAC services and that it may result in billing agencies considering the certification a prerequisite for providing services. This study aims to learn more about the perspectives of current SLPs serving as specialists in schools regarding specialty certification. Fifteen SLPs who self-identified as AAC specialists were recruited to participate in this qualitative investigation. Participants engaged in semi-structured interviews utilizing a phenomenological approach and were asked questions such as “Do you think there should be a specialty certification for AAC specialists in schools? Why or why not?” Applied Thematic Analysis is being employed to analyze interview transcripts with the goal of identifying themes and developing an interpretive model of participants’ perspectives. These themes will be used to inform issues surrounding the views that AAC specialists in schools have regarding specialty certification.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify benefits of AAC specialty certification as described by self-identified school-based AAC specialists.
  • Identify weaknesses of AAC specialty certification as described by self-identified school-based AAC specialists.
  • Describe the implications of AAC specialty certification in schools as described by self-identified school-based AAC specialists.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Tech Session 15What About the Esophagus? What Diet Do We Recommend?

Irina Brailovski, PhD, SLPD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, Jefferson Abington Health

Dysphagia is characterized by an abnormal oro-gastric bolus transit. It is generally classified into oropharyngeal dysphagia and esophageal dysphagia. The process however is interrelated. We find that many of our elderly patients have oropharyngeal dysphagia, esophageal dysphagia or a combination of both. The recent literature makes it very clear that the esophagus is included in our scope of practice. Yet, we often see MBS reports without any or very little information on what happens in the esophagus after the bolus passes through the PE segment. Additionally, recommendations made, do not consider the esophageal performance. While we are not treating esophageal dysphagia, it is crucial for us to be able to recognize the issues, help identify any dysfunction and guide the patient’s treatment in the right direction. This presentation underlines the need for a consistent systematic comprehensive approach to our instrumental assessment. It is supported by extensive research including work done by Dr. Bonnie Martin-Harris et al. as presented in “Best Practices in Modified Barium Swallow Studies” and many other articles and presentations. We need to be aware of the “degree and timing of esophageal bolus clearance both of which influence oral and pharyngeal function” (Martin-Harris et al., 2020)

In the absence of information related to esophageal clearance, we risk making inappropriate diet recommendations and causing real harm to our patients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Perform a comprehensive assessment.
  • Make safe diet recommendations.
  • Make appropriate, specific recommendation to GI.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

4:30 pm-5:00 pm

Tech Session 16 - DEISyntax Intervention for English Language Learners (ELLs)

Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

The purpose of this session will be to describe intervention procedures for syntax that are appropriate for English language learners (ELLs) who have language or other learning disabilities. In this session, the author will describe commonly used intervention methods and intervention resources available to professionals working with English language learners. The presenter will also describe how speech-language pathologists might collaborate with other professionals, such as ELL teachers and interpreters in working with ELL clients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe common intervention methods for ELL clients.
  • Describe resources for working with ELL clients.
  • Describe collaboration between SLPs and other professionals in working with ELL clients

Time-Ordered Agenda

10 minutes – using assessment data to develop goals and objectives
10 minutes – a continuum of approaches for English Language Learners
5 minutes – examples of naturalistic approaches
5 minutes – examples of clinician-directed approaches

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

5:00 pm-6:30 pm

President's Reception

6:30 pm-8:00 pm

Student Reception

Friday, April 12

8:00 am-8:30 am

Tech Session 17 - DEISyntax Assessment for English Language Learners

Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

During the process of second language acquisition, English language learners (ELLs) frequently exhibit linguistic patterns that resemble the types of errors that are associated with individuals with language learning disabilities. These linguistics patterns vary according to the client’s L1; and therefore, it is important to understand how first language syntax may influence an individual’s pattern of second language acquisition. This requires the speech-language pathologist to research the individual’s L1 as well as the typical patterns of L2 language acquisition. One purpose of this presentation will be to inform the audience about how to research the L1 syntax of clients and how to utilize these findings in interpreting assessment results. In addition, the SLP should be familiar with assessment procedures that can be used to differentiate language disability vs language difference in the cases of second language acquisition. A second purpose of this presentation will be to discuss these procedures, as well as the role interpreters may play in the assessment process.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe resources for researching syntactic L1 characteristics.
  • Describe how to interpret and use information about a client’s L1 during assessment.
  • Describe assessment procedures appropriate for ELL clients.

Time-Ordered Agenda

5 minutes – language difference vs language disorder
10 minutes – overview of second language syntax acquisition
10 minutes – informal and formal measures of syntax for ELLs
5 minutes – analyzing results and planning treatment

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

8:00 am-9:30 am

Session 20AAC and Early Intervention: Getting Started

Amanda Samperi, MS, CCC-SLP; Darlette Navrotski, MA, CCC-SLP; Becca Hoke, MA, CCC-SLP, from PRC-Saltillo

What is augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)? Could children under three benefit from using AAC? If so, when and how do I get started? These questions and more will be discussed in this 90-minute introductory session about AAC and early intervention. Participants will learn about the different types of AAC, and how to support language and communication in early language learning. The course will discuss common myths and parental concerns surrounding AAC in the birth to three population. Strategies and resources are provided to help early interventionists support parents in considering and using AAC options. Undergraduate students, graduate students and professional SLPs are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the different types of AAC used in early intervention.
  • Discuss three common concerns regarding AAC and early intervention.
  • Identify three resources to support AAC in Early Intervention.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 21 - DEIInclusive Spaces: Supporting Students Through A DEIA Community of Practice

Laura Sibbald, MA, CCC-SLP, Chestnut Hill College; Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian University; Patricia Swasey Washington, PhD, CCC-SLP, West Chester University; Lisa Bedore, PhD, CCC-SLP, Temple University

This presentation will focus on the process of development and implementation of an online Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility (DEIA) community of practice designed to support student members in audiology and speech-language pathology. We will discuss the theoretical foundations, practical considerations and potential benefits of implementing an online community of practice platform for supporting members from DEIA backgrounds. A discussion of the ethical considerations and logistical challenges we encountered in creating this online community of practice, as well as possible solutions to these challenges, will also be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the design and management of an online community of practice for in audiology and speech-language pathology.
  • Discuss the importance of supporting DEIA through community of practice platforms in the field of audiology and speech-language pathology.
  • Discuss the contribution of community of practice to the operation of DEIA Committee and PSHA
  • Identify common logistical obstacles to organizing an online community of practice as well as potential solutions.

Time-Ordered Agenda

8:00        Welcome, Introduction of Speakers, Financial/Non Financial Disclosure
8:10        Background Information on the DEIA Committee vs the Community of Practice
8:20        Theoretical Foundations supporting a Student COP focused in DEIA
8:35        Logistics: Outreach to Student Communities- Using NSSLHA effectively
8:50        Overview of Session Topics, Feedback, & Benefits
9:10        Barriers Encountered
9:20        Group Discussion: Implementation Opportunities
9:28        Final Wrap Up
9:30        End of Session

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 22- ETHICSInformed Consent: How We Got Here and Why It Matters

Session Sponsor:

Pamela Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP

Clinicians are required to obtain informed consent from patients prior to providing any assessment and interventions. Patients have the right to participate in their own care planning, select interventions which are acceptable to them, change their minds about their care and make informed choices. For many clinicians these aspects of practice seem like new challenges that clinicians may feel unprepared to meet. The reality is that these patients’ rights have been part of federal statute for more than 25 years; they are far from new. Informed consent laws have been part of the evolution of modern medicine for well over 100 years. How did we get where we are today? Why does it matter? What if the patient makes decisions that we think are “unsafe?” Why do some clinicians refer to those patients as “noncompliant?” We will take a historical dive into Informed Consent, exploring legal precedence and ethical principles. Using case examples we will discuss the multifactored “perfect storm” that brings us where we are today.

Time-Ordered Agenda

Introduction, disclosures

  • 5 Mins: Set the stage:  A common clinical interaction.  What’s wrong with this picture?
  • 5 Mins: Definitions, Paternalism, Autonomy, Negligence, Decision making capacity, Ethics, Compliance/noncompliance

HOW WE GOT HERE

  • 15 Mins: Medical history of Paternalism and Informed Consent, Hippocratic Oath, Court cases 20th century – timeline, Practitioners’ perspectives, Complicating factors, Process not paper, Components of Informed Consent, Comprehension, Choice, Consequences, X Coercion
  • 10 Mins: Informed Consent in CSD, SLP profession in health care, Principles of Ethics, Canterbury v. Spence, 1972, Patient Self-Determination Act, 1990

WHY IT MATTERS

  • 10 Mins: Legal and Ethical Issues, Penalties for violations, Malpractice and negligence, Best practice (consequences of aspiration), Documentation recommendations
  • 15 Mins: What’s an SLP to do? Let’s use a case. Accurate and thorough assessment first, Adhere to best practice, Consideration of all management alternatives, Sharing of information, Who can make the decision? Is there any question of capacity? But what if? The best way to avoid a lawsuit, Problems with waivers, Document and document
  • 10 Mins: Related Issues, Employer demands, Time/availability, What about my license?
  • 20 Mins:  Time for questions and discussion

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three significant legal cases that led to the development and refinement of informed consent laws.
  • Describe the principles of ethics and how informed consent laws protect patient autonomy.
  • Discuss the evolution of content knowledge in speech-language pathology, particularly in dysphagia management, and how this affects clinicians’ discussions with patients.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 23Treating Stuttering and Cluttering: Examining the Options for Individual Clients

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, from Misericordia University

Treating stuttering and/or cluttering can be complicated. Many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) report decreased comfort in working in this area (Chmela & Johnson, 2018). This can be especially true given the lower incidence of fluency disorders in comparison to other communication disorders, such as language and articulation (ASHA, 2023). To make matters more complicated, there are a growing number of stuttering and cluttering treatments, many of which are presented as “the” most effective treatment. Yet, given the fact that we know clients present with individual symptoms, how does an SLP choose the “best” approach for their particular client? In this 90-minute presentation, the authors will present factors to consider in choosing an individualized approach for stuttering and/or cluttering clients. The presentation will cover decision making based upon age, client and family factors. The authors will present a framework for determining an individualized approach to client care. Topics discussed will include differential diagnosis, determining readiness for treatment, direct and indirect treatments, treatment activities beyond strategies, caregiver education, treatments in a digital age and neurodiversity treatment considerations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • State three factors to consider when choosing a treatment approach for a client.
  • State three options for stuttering and/or cluttering treatment that go beyond strategies.
  • Describe the process for determining readiness for treatment.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

8:30 am-9:00 am

Tech Session 18An Exploratory Study on Graduate Students’ Diagnostic Decisions

Rebecca Bawayan, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian University

This session will discuss an exploratory study examining effective training methods to improve diagnostic decision making of child language disorders for graduate students. Current first year preservice speech language pathology graduate students participated in this exploratory study. Twenty students were provided with three case studies of children with developmental language disorder (DLD) and answered questions about eligibility, the information they used to come to their decision, other information they would want to collect in an assessment and possible intervention targets. After completing the case study pre-assessment, the students received explicit training in the clinical markers of during an in-person training module provided during a problem-based learning course on pediatric speech and language disorders. After completion of the module, the students were given the post-assessment that contained the same case studies they were given in the pre-assessment. Students also completed a survey after providing their feedback on the module including the most impactful and challenging learning components. Results of the study and implications for future research, clinical practice and pedological approaches will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify evidence-based strategies for enhancing graduate students’ diagnostic decision-making skills in the area of child language disorders.
  • Discuss the study method, results and conclusions.
  • Identify implications for future research, clinical practice and pedagogical teaching methods.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

9:00 am-9:30 am

Tech Session 19AAC for Young Autistic Children: A Strength-Based Approach

Barbara Weber, MS, CCC-SLP, private practice

This session will address promoting early language via augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for young autistic children with speech and language delays. Behavioral and naturalistic strategies will be identified to provide optimized supports from a strength-based perspective. The focus will be on clinical challenges and considerations as beginning communicators move from first word utterances to multi-word combinations and their generalization. The presenter will share treatment strategies that entail evidence-based practices, enlist caregiver input and provide effective AAC interventions for early language and social communication supports. Video cases will demonstrate a variety of AAC scenarios that focus on partnering with families experiencing autism and jointly establishing intervention priorities.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Determine critical variables for a strength-based early intervention approach with neurodivergent young children.
  • Describe a step-by-step program of implementing AAC when teaching foundational language skills
  • Discuss major elements of building partnerships with and engaging parents in early intervention efforts.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

10:00 am-10:30 am

Tech Session 20The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Searching for Stuttering and Cluttering Information: Separating Fact from Fiction

Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Kathleen Scaler-Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, from Misericordia University; Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Michigan State University

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) programs, such as Chat GPT, for finding accurate information about stuttering and cluttering is becoming increasingly popular, especially among graduate students and speech-language pathologists. While AI programs can provide quick access to vast amounts of data, there are concerns about their reliability and accuracy. The purpose of this proposal is to caution students and clinicians about the limitations of using AI programs for finding accurate information about stuttering and cluttering. AI programs provide information based on statistical analysis of large datasets. They may not always provide accurate information or consider the context of the question being asked, especially when it comes to clinical decision-making. To illustrate the potential limitations of chat GPT and other AI programs, we provide several examples. In one search, we asked Chat GPT to provide peer reviewed references for treating preschool children who stutter. While the program generated responses such as early intervention, parental involvement, positive reinforcement, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (Yaruss & Colemann, 2015) and the Lidcombe Program (Packman et al., 2015), it also included the use of the Speech Easy Device (Ingham et al., 2008; Kalinowski et al., 2010). The AI program indicated that these devices were effective with preschoolers who stutter. The Ingham et al. article that it cited was on the genetic factors involved in stuttering and the Kalinowski et al. article did not include any information on preschool children. In a separate search, Chat GPT indicated that stuttering modification or the use of the Speech Easy Device (Bothe et al., 2006) is not typically used with preschoolers who stutter. This information is confusing and contradictory. In another search, we asked if there was an association between the Lidcombe program and the authors of this presentation. The program provided completely inaccurate information indicating that the authors developed and refined the Lidcombe program. For example, it indicated “The submitting authors are particularly well-known for their work on the Lidcombe Program and developed the program.” Of course, this is not an accurate attribution or characterization of our work. We also asked Chat GPT to provide names of Board-Certified Fluency or Stuttering Specialists in Pennsylvania, USA. Chat GPT made up inaccurate responses, listing specialists in Pennsylvania including Jane Fraser, Scott Yaruss (The Center for Stuttering), Heather Clark (Penn State Stuttering Clinic), Vivian Siskin, Evan Usler (Duquesne University), Bridget Walsh (Walsh Speech and Language Services in Harrisburg) and Scott Palasik (Director of the Stuttering Center of Western Pennsylvania). All of these answers are incorrect. The use of AI programs for finding information about stuttering and cluttering has many limitations. In this presentation, we will provide further examples of SOAP notes, lesson plans and treatment plans while cautioning students and clinicians about the accuracy and reliability of the information generated by AI programs. We will also highlight ways that users can review the information generated by AI programs critically and consult with experts before making clinical decisions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the limitations of using AI programs, such as Chat GPT, for accessing information about stuttering and cluttering.
  • Develop the skills to critically evaluate information generated by AI programs related to stuttering and cluttering, discerning accuracy, context and reliability.
  • Be equipped with strategies to consult with experts and verify information obtained from AI programs before making clinical decisions in the field of stuttering and cluttering.
  • Apply the knowledge gained about the limitations of AI programs for information retrieval in stuttering and cluttering to improve their evidence-based decision-making processes as graduate students and speech-language pathologists.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

10:00 am-11:30 am

Session 24Case Studies in Pediatric Dysphagia for Problem Solving

Marcel Paules-Broadway, MS, CCC-SLP

Speech-language pathologists that provide evaluation and treatment in Pediatric Feeding and Dysphagia face challenges unique to each individual child and their families. This seminar will present real life case studies and interventions, along with videos and audience participation to offer problem solving solutions and alternative treatments.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three interventions for children with sensory impairments.
  • Name three strategies for picky eaters as result of GERD.
  • Describe three evaluation tools to use to diagnosed pediatric feeding disorders.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 25Dissecting Uncommon CAPD Cases

Maegan Mapes, AuD, Penn State University

This course will review individuals you may work with that have auditory processing difficulties, but you either they are not someone you would think to refer for a CAPD evaluation or you do not think they would be able to do the testing. We will discuss who these individuals are, TBI, stroke patients, dyspraxia, autism, selective mute, as some examples. We will discuss testing options, treatment options and review some existing cases.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Learn tools to identify individuals with auditory weaknesses.
  • Identify non traditional methods of evaluation.
  • Explain examples of treatment options with outcome measures.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Audiology

Session 26Introduction to Gestalt Language

Jessica Reyes, MS, CCC-SLP; Stephanie Donahoe, MS, CCC-SLP, from Allegheny Intermediate Unit

This presentation will introduce the concept of gestalt language and its application to current practices in school-based speech and language therapy settings. Participants will gain an understanding of gestalt language and its role in language development. They will be able to explain the stages of gestalt language development (Natural Language Acquisition) and how it differs from Analytic Language Development. A general overview of the recommended protocol for assessing gestalt language will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the stages of gestalt language development.
  • Analyze difference between gestalt and analytic language development.
  • Identify recommended protocols for assessing gestalt language.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 27 - SupervisionProviding School-Specific Supervision Using a Learner-Centered Lens

Joe Ashenden, SLPD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

Supporting the clinical training of graduate speech-language pathology students within the school setting requires clinical supervisors to provide context-specific instruction. Future educational speech-language pathologists need explicit training in areas including special education law, service delivery models, comprehensive evaluation methods and educationally relevant treatment (ASHA, 2010). Metacognitive skills can be developed within graduate student clinicians utilizing pedagogical principles and can help to facilitate growth in clinical skills and critical thinking. A teaching approach grounded in metacognitive skill development can also enable the instructor to center the learner within the clinical education process (Ambrose, 2010). This session will discuss the context-specific instruction required for clinical supervision in educational speech-language pathology, establish a learner-centered lens for supervision based upon metacognitive skills and pedagogical principles and apply this lens to site-specific supervision within the public-school setting.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the context-specific instruction required within educational speech-language pathology.
  • Explain the importance of metacognitive skill development in learner-centered clinical supervision.
  • Identify pedagogical principals to support the development of metacognitive skills.
  • Apply a learner-centered clinical supervision lens to context-specific supervision within the school setting.

Time-Ordered Agenda

10:00-10: 30: Introductions and review of specific clinical facets unique to school-based speech-language pathology that impact supervision.

10:30-11:00: Review of teaching and learning concepts and connecting these concepts to school-based supervision

11:00-11:20: Application of concepts to case study examples

11:20-11:30: Conclusions and question/answer session

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

10:30 am-11:00 am

Tech Session 21Shape Coding: A Novel Intervention for Agrammatic Aphasia

Jenna Gregor, MS, CCC-SLP; Maggie Morgan, BS, PennWest University California

There are currently a number of evidence-based approaches available to treat nonfluent aphasia, however one specific area lacking a targeted intervention protocol is agrammatism. This limitation in evidence-based interventions can make targeting use of function words in agrammatic aphasia challenging. This presentation will first provide an overview of Shape Coding as an intervention utilized to formally target grammar use in pediatric language treatment including the research base for the approach. Next, the current widely used approaches for treatment of nonfluent aphasia will be discussed, including limitations related to treatment specifically for agrammatism. Lastly, the presentation will include a review of available research regarding the use of Shape Coding in aphasia, along with potential applications of the approach in aphasia treatment. This application portion of the presentation will include discussion about a case study of an individual with chronic, agrammatic aphasia with whom Shape Coding was implemented.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe Shape Coding as a technique along with it’s use and evidence-base in child language areas.
  • Identify current treatment approaches available for agrammatic aphasia.
  • Apply principles of Shape Coding to the treatment of agrammatic aphasia.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

11:00 am-11:30 am

Tech Session 22Content Analysis of Dysphagia and Aspiration Pneumonia

Reethee Antony, PhD; Sundeep Venkatesan, MS, CCC-SLP; Sreenath Madathil, PhD, from Binghamton University

Aspiration pneumonia is a frequent cause of rehospitalization. However, the relationship between dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia is less explored. In this study, the relationship between aspiration pneumonia and dysphagia will be explored using a database from the National Institute of Health. The relationship between concomitant factors with aspiration pneumonia and dysphagia will be examined and explored. The results from the study will help facilitate in building a better interdisciplinary team and will help emphasize the need for teamwork and education of dysphagia among health professionals.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List two symptoms of dysphagia.
  • Define aspiration.
  • Identify two etiology related to dysphagia.
  • Define interprofessional practice.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

11:30 am-1:00 pm

Posters

11:45 am-12:45 pm

Session 28Effective Leadership: Driving Change Through Growth

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, PennWest University; Megan Farkasovsky, MA, PPG

This seminar will focus on discussing effective leadership by focusing on building effective teams and driving change through personal and professional growth. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in question/answer session to bring their own topics for discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss ways of self-evaluating for leadership skills.
  • Identify strategies for effective communication in leadership models.
  • Describe potential challenges and opportunities in leadership positions.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

1:00 pm-1:30 pm

Tech Session 23Safe at Lunch MTSS Program

Sarah Reiber, MA, CCC-SLP; Amy Miller, MA, CCC-SLP, from Midwestern Intermediate Unit IV

Our feeding/swallowing team provides support for school teams to keep students safe during meals and ensure adequate nutrition for learning. The team focuses on helping school staff enable students to become safe and independent eaters. Due to a growing number of students needing support with eating skills, we wondered how to reach more students by teaching general rules for safety and positive eating behaviors, without spending time assessing each student’s skills. That’s when we considered an MTSS approach to reach students at every level, in a fun and engaging manner. From this idea came what is now known in our local schools as the Safe at Lunch Bunch. During the program, our life-sized puppets are eating in the school cafeteria for the first time. It’s finally their turn but they have some anxiety over how to behave eating at school. Through trial and error, along with participation from the school students, the Safe at Lunch Bunch, learn expectations in the cafeteria. Kindergarten through second graders are taught new words to a familiar tune, play games with puppets and learn mealtime rules including nice small bites, take your time and sit up straight. At the end of the program, coloring books for carrying over at home and posters to display in the cafeteria or classrooms are provided for reviewing positive behaviors learned. Our team’s goal is to develop programs that bring awareness and general safety strategies to all children; reducing mealtime struggles and individualized support in the school setting.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the changing needs of students with feeding and swallowing concerns in the schools setting.
  • Name multiple MTSS approaches to address these concerns.
  • Identify ways to address feeding and swallowing needs within their own organization through tiered supports.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

1:00 pm-2:30 pm

Session 29Aphasia Therapy: A Review of the Reviews!

Bruce Wisenburn, PhD, CCC-SLP, Marywood University

Over the past 15 years, the author has conducted and presented meta-analyses or systematic reviews of the following aphasia treatment issues: anomia, agrammatism, auditory comprehension deficits, reading deficits, spelling deficits, primary progressive aphasia, attention deficits, group treatment, conversational/functional treatment and paraphasia. This seminar will review these reviews! This includes a summary of experimental research-based evidence for each of these treatment issues. In addition, we will take a broad overview of the state of aphasia research in relation to clinical needs. Finally, we will review methods of accessing information in order to provide evidence-based treatment for people with aphasia.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the research evidence for a variety of treatment issues related to aphasia.
  • Describe the state of the research in aphasia related to a variety of clinical issues.
  • Identify updated sources of information to access clinical aphasia research.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 30Early Career Panel: A Collection of Lessons, Advice and Cautionary Tales

Ali Lewandowski, MA, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh; Brittany Coleman, MS, CCC-SLP; Amy Moon, UPMC; Brianna Leonard, MS, CCC-SLP, UPMC; Hope Warner, MS, CCC-SLP, Pittsburgh Public Schools

Emma Alscher, AuD, CH-TM, UPMC Eye and Ear Institute

This session will be a panel comprised of multiple clinicians at various settings and stages of their careers. The panel will highlight several topics relevant to early clinicians including finding the right “fit” for you both clinically and personally, setting boundaries, learning how and when to say “No,”

 accepting uncertainty, contract negotiation and much more. While it can be very overwhelming to navigate a new career in healthcare, these panelists will share some of their experiences and lessons learned throughout their careers including advice they were given, advice they WISH they were given and how to find comfort in the unknown.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe different opportunities available to pursue a career in communication science and disorders.
  • Determine important personal and occupational factors to consider as an early career clinician.
  • Acquire skills and confidence to advocate for yourself in the workplace.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 31 - DEIThe Bilingual IEP Meeting Toolkit: How to Advocate for Language Access

Leah Fabiano, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

A major contributor to misdiagnosis of bilingual children with speech and language impairment is the use of standardized test scores. This presentation will address standardized tests and misdiagnosis, will provide information on interpretation of policy on diagnostic eligibility for services and will provide strategies for advocating for the use of best practices to qualify children for services. Federal databases illustrate an over-representation of Latinx children receiving speech and language services (U.S. Department of Education, 2018). A major contributor to this problem is the use of standardized test scores designed for monolingual English-speaking children to qualify children who are bilingual (Skahan, Watson, & Lof, 2007). Bilingual children are often qualified for speech and language services based on a single standardized test score (Kraemer & Fabiano-Smith, 2017). Clinicians report that the lack of appropriate assessment tools is a major challenge in working with bilingual populations (Guiberson & Atkins, 2012); however, school districts continue to demand scores to make qualification and funding decisions (Klingner et al., 2006). Recent work reported that standardized tests over-qualify one in three bilingual children for speech and language services (Barragan, et al., 2018) and up to nine percent of bilingual children are misdiagnosed due to the use of standardized tests in some states (Klingner & Artiles, 2003, p. 67). Graduate programs in speech-language pathology remain focused on a monolingual English training model (ASHA, 2020) and 95 percent of ASHA-certified clinicians report no bilingual skills (ASHA, 2013). This panel discussion will address how standardized tests over-qualify children, will provide information on interpretation of federal and state policy on diagnostic eligibility for services, will provide strategies for advocating for the use of informal measures to qualify/disqualify bilingual children for services in IEP meetings, and will detail steps we can take as a field to increase our quality of care and avoid systematic discrimination.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of the interpreter in the IEP meeting and strategies for recruitment and retention of interpreters in SLP.
  • Demonstrate advocacy skills in the role of language expert in the IEP meeting for bilingual children and families.

Time-Ordered Agenda

1:00-1:15: Introduction to Bilingualism in the US
1:15-1:20:Misdiagnosis of Communication Disorders in Bilingual Peds
1:20-1:50: Bilingual Assessment
1:50-2:10: IEP Meeting Tips
2:10-2:20: IEP Meetings and Interpreters
2:20-2:30: Summary and Conclusion

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 32Master Class - The Case for Dynamic Coaching: Coaching in Action

Donald L MacLennan, MA, CCC-SLP, Minneapolis VA Health Care System

Dynamic coaching, first described by Ylvisaker and Holland (1985) and refined by Ylvisaker and Feeney (1998) and Mary Kennedy (2017) provides a functional, client-centered therapeutic process for cognitive rehabilitation. Content for therapy is provided by the client. Dynamic coaching centers on the interaction between the client and the clinician in the development of goals, identification of therapeutic approaches and implementation of therapy. The clinician’s role is one of guiding or coaching the client by modeling and explicitly instructing on self-regulation as a process. In session, this involves a reciprocal back-and-forth between the client and clinician, where the observations and questions posed by the clinician guide the client to self-identify solutions to real-life problems. Ultimately, the goal of dynamic coaching is for the client to internalize the process of self-regulation and begin to self-coach. The real work involved in implementing therapies is done outside of the clinic and then reviewed and modified as needed in session. As dynamic coaching does not occur in a vacuum, the process of dynamic coaching will be illustrated in the context of six guiding principles and four phases of cognitive rehabilitation as described by The Working Group to Develop a Clinician’s Guide to Cognitive Rehabilitation in mild TBI (2016). Clinical examples will be provided and a case study will illustrate how this approach aligns with 10 principles of experience-dependent plasticity (Kleim & Jones, 2008). Clinical examples pertain to TBI, however, use of dynamic coaching therapeutic process is applicable to all clients seen by SLPs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe components of dynamic coaching as a therapeutic process.
  • Identify key ingredients of three potent outcomes variables: therapeutic alliance, self-efficacy and resilience.
  • Explain how using dynamic coaching in a clinical context satisfies key ingredients of the three potent outcomes variables.
  • Describe how the concept of experience-dependent neuroplasticity applies to functionally oriented Cognitive Rehabilitation using a dynamic coaching approach.

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Adult SLP

1:30 pm-2:00 pm

Tech Session 24The Swallow Continuum: The Importance of Esophageal Sweeps in Dysphagia

Jessica Bren, MS, CCC-SLP, Penn State Health

This presentation is designed for speech-language pathologists in the medical setting who complete videofluoroscopic swallow studies. ASHA describes the use of instrumental assessments as a means for speech-language pathologists to “assist in the determination of a differential medical diagnosis related to the presence of dysphagia [and/or] associated with a high risk of dysphagia” (ASHA Practice Portal, Adult Dysphagia). Recent advocacy for examination of the continuum of the swallowing mechanism argues for the use of esophageal sweeps on instrumental swallow studies to rule out esophageal-related implications causing dysphagia or feeding difficulties (Reedy, Herbert, Bonhila, 2021). A pediatric case study will be reviewed to outline the importance of panning to the middle portion of the esophagus to rule out dysphagia lusoria, a condition affecting less than one percent of the population, defined as posterior compression of the esophagus by a congenital cardiac anomaly of the aortic arch. After review of the study and the research literature, the presentation will review the current literature regarding dysphagia lusoria in pediatric populations, reported symptoms and visualized changes in anatomy on an instrumental swallow study. Observers will learn more about esophageal dysphagia and ways to for advocate esophageal sweeps in their radiology departments.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of an esophageal sweep on videofluoroscopic swallow studies.
  • Identify the anatomical change made by posterior esophageal impressions.
  • Describe the symptoms in current literature associated with the diagnosis of dysphagia lusoria and associated with posterior esophageal compressions.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

2:00 pm-2:30 pm

Tech Session 25The Power of Joint Attention

Rose Griffin, MA, CCC-SLP, ABA SPEECH

In this course participants will learn about the importance of joint attention. Participants will learn about many specific actionable strategies that they can use to embed work on joint attention in their therapy sessions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance of joint attention when providing intervention for autistic learners.
  • List three strategies for incorporating work on joint attention during therapy sessions.
  • State how to write functional goals for targeting joint attention during therapy sessions.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Pediatric SLP

3:00 pm-3:30 pm

Tech Session 26Ecologically Valid Assessment Methods for Individuals With Acquired Brain Injury

Louise Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian University

The heterogeneity of acquired brain injury has been long established. However, as a profession we continue to turn to standardized measures of assessment that may not always accurately capture the individualized needs of those with communication difficulties post acquired brain injury. This presentation first outlines a model of social communication that can provide clinically applicable guidance for individualized assessment selection (Keegan et al., 2023). Second, easily accessible (e.g., freely available) assessment resources and recommendations are provided. Finally, clinical case examples are described to highlight evidence-based intervention decisions that are grounded in individualized and ecologically valid assessment methods.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe ecologically valid assessment methods for those with acquired brain injury.
  • Apply the social model in decision making regarding assessment.
  • Discuss the application of assessment results as relative to individualized interventions.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

3:00 pm-4:30 pm

Session 33Behavior is Communication; Managing Challenging Behaviors for School-Based SLP

Nicole Billak, EdD, CCC-SLP, Thiel College

With the growing diversity in the school-based SLP’s caseload, clinicians are seeing an increase in challenging behaviors. While briefly discussed at the graduate level, supervisors have rated the graduate student’s ability to manage challenging behaviors as their main area of concern. This course will provide the attendee with knowledge and skills that can be used for managing challenging behaviors of children in the school setting. The presenter will provide details on determining the function of behaviors, providing preventative ideas for reducing challenging behaviors, and how to deescalate students in crisis. Learn skills and strategies that you can use immediately with your students.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the possible functions of a behavior.
  • Name antecedent strategies to prevent challenging behaviors.
  • Name deescalation strategies that could be used during the behavior curve.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 34Social and Nutritional Aspects of Dysphagia

Pamela Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP

Many cultures view food and drink as symbolic of love and care. It is part of family celebrations, holiday traditions, recreational activities and simply daily life. With dysphagia, these life experiences become difficult at times leading to depression and social isolation. In clinical practice the speech-language pathologist (SLP) is trained to evaluate the physiological aspects of the swallow and recommend specific treatments that match the identified disorder, with the goal of improving the swallow. Common recommendations for diet modifications can lead to refusal of food and drink, leading to nutritional deficits. The social, emotional and nutritional aspects of dysphagia are vital aspects of the patient’s experience eating and drinking, which is the ultimate outcome of dysphagia interventions. Assessment and treatment should consider these non-physiological aspects of dysphagia, which may supersede physiological findings as SLPs participate in shared decision making with patients and their families. This session will discuss aspects of dysphagia management that go beyond the physiology of swallowing itself. We will also discuss the requirements of the process of informed consent and regulatory support for honoring patients’ right to direct their own care.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the relative risk of negative health outcomes resulting from swallowing disorders.
  • Describe the impact of dysphagia and dysphagia care on quality of life.
  • Describe the process and requirements of informed consent for diet consistency determination.
  • Discuss the importance of open communication between patients, families and clinicians in optimizing the eating and drinking experience with dysphagia.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 35Master Class - The Case for Dynamic Coaching: Application to EBP and PBE

Donald L MacLennan, MA, CCC-SLP, Minneapolis VA Health Care System

This presentation illustrates the use of a functional dynamic coaching approach for specific cognitive rehabilitation treatments. Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the gold standard for rehabilitation. EBP asks the question: if we apply a very specific treatment “X” to a very specific type of person “Y”, does it result in a very specific outcome “Z.” The tightly controlled conditions associated with EBP studies enable researchers to say that the treatment caused a positive outcome. A number of EBP treatments will be illustrated across a variety of cognitive domains in the context of a dynamic coaching approach. However, there are a limited number of EBP treatments available raising the questions: what if the client rejects EBP treatments for a specific cognitive challenge?, or, what if there are no available EBP treatments for a client’s problem? Practice-Based Evidence (PBE) provides an alternative to EBP treatments and is particularly useful in clinical environments where clinicians are unable to control all relevant treatment variables. The key to PBE is collecting data that can be used to answer the question, if you apply treatment “X” to the complex world of client “Y”, does it result in positive change that is meaningful to the client? Several PBE treatments developed by the presenter will be used to illustrate PBE and clinician characteristics that facilitate PBE will be discussed. It is important to remember that the use of PBE is scientifically sound and that all EBP treatments had their origins in PBE.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the benefits and challenges associated with EBP.
  • Identify at least five EBP treatments that can be used in a dynamic coaching framework.
  • Identify the benefits and challenges associated with PBE.
  • Identify at least two EBP treatments that can be used in a dynamic coaching framework.

Instructional Level: Advanced | Track: Adult SLP

Session 36Using Montessori-Based Interventions for Decreasing Response Behaviors in Individuals With Dementia

Ryan Husak, PhD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University; Anastasia Martinez, MS, CCC-SLP, Saint Joseph Villa; Gabriella Magazzeni, La Salle University

Montessori methods were initially developed for children’s education by Dr. Maria Montessori (1912), who believed that children “learn through their hands.” This method emphasized individualized and independent learning. In recent years, Montessori-based activities have been adapted and applied to the care and treatment of individuals with dementia residing in long-term care (LTC) facilities. Research shows that Montessori activities are a cost-efficient and effective intervention for engaging residents in everyday tasks that are meaningful, purposeful and stimulating and that can improve their quality of life. (Camp, 2010). Montessori activities are designed to tap the preserved procedural memory skills of individuals with dementia and therefore foster a sense of purpose and achievement. The aim of this presentation is to summarize the research evidence on Montessori-based activities for individuals with dementia and describe the role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in developing and implementing Montessori-based interventions for reducing adverse and unsafe behaviors (A.K.A. “response behaviors”). This presentation will focus on the following features: providing practical guidance to help SLPs develop and implement Montessori-based activities at their place of employment in LTC, describing techniques for monitoring and documenting clients’ progress in response to Montessori-based interventions and showcasing success stories of real-life examples where Montessori-based interventions made a positive impact on individuals with dementia and the healthcare professionals working the LTC facility. The presentation will also provide helpful information for SLPs to utilize in discussions with directors and managers of LTC facilities about implementing Montessori activities at their place of employment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe Montessori-based interventions for individuals with dementia.
  • Implement Montessori-based interventions in long-term care facilities.
  • Summarizing research evidence on the use of Montessori-based treatments.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

3:30 pm-4:00 pm

Tech Session 27Eight SLPs’ Perspectives on Primary Progressive Aphasia Treatment and Assessment

Hannah Bilenski, BS; Chitrali Mamlekar, PhD, CCC-SLP; Shannon Murphy, BS; Olivia Olley; Dara Philippen; Sonal Garg; Chitrali Mamlekar, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a progressive neurological disease causing gradual loss of speech and language abilities. Although incurable, interventions such as speech and language therapy coupled with caregiver education can alleviate symptoms. Unfortunately, nearly 43% of speech language pathologists (SLP) report being unfamiliar with PPA, primarily due to insufficient training, a lack of guidelines for treatment and limited speech and language services. Nevertheless, SLPs possess knowledge in communication assessment, cognitive rehabilitation and person-centered interventions, which can improve the quality of life for individuals with PPA. This phenomenological study aimed to explore the types of speech and language services provided by SLPs to people with PPA and identify the barriers and facilitators in PPA-related service delivery. Eight ASHA certified SLPs were interviewed via Zoom and were audio recorded. Analyses revealed themes related to barriers, facilitators and treatment considerations. Barriers included: low-referral rates of PPA; resource limitations for SLPs; impact of PPA on patients and their families and challenges surrounding AAC treatment. Facilitators were: need for flexibility in adapting treatment plans to address disease progression; PPA support groups; and importance of family education. Finally, treatment consideration encompassed impairment and activity-based treatments and participation-based treatments. SLPs identified several barriers, including unrealistic expectations, low motivation and difficulty in maintaining progress. However, all participants agreed that SLP interventions could be beneficial. The participants recommended addressing both impairment and activity-participation levels, providing tailored education and support and involving support groups and family members in managing the disease.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the barriers and facilitators that impact the SLP services for individuals with PPA.
  • Recall the current assessments and interventions being used by SLPs in the United States for individuals with PPA.
  • Identify the factors that influence an SLP’s decision when deciding on what assessment and treatment methods to use for individuals with PPA.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Adult SLP

4:00 pm-4:30 pm

Tech Session 28CFY and Beyond: Tips for Entering Settings in the Field

Erica Cappellini, MS, CCC-SLP, Pediatric Developmental Services

SLPs entering the field or switching settings may feel hesitant and insecure about their abilities to excel in their careers. In this presentation, a seasoned professional will offer strategies for success and words of wisdom gleaned from more than 20 years of experience in nearly all aspects and settings of the SLP field. She will share her successful journey from early intervention, through schools and private practice, through end of life–in both in-person and virtual modalities. This interactive seminar will engage listeners and assist them in determining their own values and uniquely appropriate next steps to choosing a position that best meets them as individuals. The presentation will discuss ways to build skills in any setting, facilitate great progress for clients, keep passion for the career alive and increase overall value as a professional. Find and follow a path to success!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify at least three strategies to increase their success in any placement.
  • Explain why they do not need to feel locked into one setting as an SLP.
  • Name three qualities to look for in a good placement that matches their personality and interests.

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

4:45 pm-6:15 pm

Session 3750 Years of Dysphagia: Current Practice and Future Directions

Yvette McCoy, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, Moravian University; Ed Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP, Iopi Medical

The first publication by a speech-language pathologist (SLP) concerning the assessment and treatment of swallowing was published 50 years ago. Fifty years of research has provided a framework for evidence-based practice in the presence of a multidisciplinary team. Current evidence-based practice requires consideration of compensatory strategies, which may decrease airway invasion and rehabilitation of the swallowing mechanism to provide lasting change. However, given the evidence supporting most common interventions, thoughtful clinicians can no longer simply select interventions from books and lists. Moving practice forward requires the SLP to consider a treatment regimen that includes the scientific principles of strength training, motor learning and neuroplasticity based on the current understanding of physiology. Since the biological purpose of eating is to maintain nutrition and hydration, which are essential for recovery from illness and are associated with multiple medical conditions beyond the SLP decision-making scope, input from other disciplines is a necessary component of therapy. The current presentation will review the 50-year journey, present scientific concepts to inform contemporary practice and illustrate the value of a multidisciplinary team approach.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List six interventions from early speech-language practice.
  • Identify four factors to consider in developing a treatment intervention for dysphagia.
  • Name three components necessary to critically analyze research.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 38PROMPT: A Whole-Child Approach

Amy Clark, MS, CCC-SLP, Prompt Institute

Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT) is a whole-child evidenced-based approach that helps a wide range of children, including those with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), reach their full potential. PROMPT assessment and treatment approaches communication as an interaction of the Physical-Sensory, Cognitive-Linguistic and Social-Emotional Domains. It takes into consideration how children understand and use language, socially interact with others and how their articulators move during speech production. This presentation will describe key components of PROMPT. Interactive case studies will highlight how this whole-child approach is applied in CAS assessment and treatment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe key components of PROMPT assessment and treatment.
  • Explain the Physical-Sensory, Cognitive-Linguistic and Social Emotional Domains.
  • Summarize what makes PROMPT a whole-child approach.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Saturday, April 13

8:00 am-9:30 am

Session 39How Do I Write Therapy Goals for Children Who Stutter?

Seth Tichenor, PhD, CCC-SLP, Duquesne University; Amanda Hampton Wray, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Pittsburgh

How should I structure therapy for this child who stutters on my caseload? How do I write good clinical goals for children who stutter? These two heavily related questions are commonly asked by many speech-language pathologists (SLPs). In this presentation, we will delve into this topic of how to write appropriate therapeutic goals for preschoolers and school-age children who stutter that will enable you (the SLP) to track progress in therapy. We will frame this discussion by incorporating up-to-date research in the area of childhood stuttering, which highlights that many of our standard therapeutic approaches are not significantly beating natural recovery rates in preschoolers and therapy in the school-age years remains highly fluency-focused. Specifically, we will provide an overview of best-practice therapy recommendations for these populations before discussing case studies which highlight goals for various time-points throughout the course of therapy for hypothetical clients. For preschoolers, we will give examples of both more-direct and more-indirect therapy goals and how clinicians can incorporate those goals and apply them in therapy. For school-age children, we will discuss holistic therapy aimed at minimizing, reducing, or preventing adverse impact related while increasing communication confidence. Our examples for school-age children will include goals that cover affective, behavioral and cognitive aspects as well goals aimed at mitigating the challenges of a children’s environment

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three best practices for preschool and school-age therapy for children who stutter.
  • Differentiate more appropriate versus less appropriate goals for children who stutter.
  • Discuss how best practices for childhood therapy and goal-writing can inform each other.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 40 - SupervisionHow to be an Effective Clinical Supervisor in the Healthcare and Telepractice Settings

Nancy Carlino, MA, CCC-SLP, Penn West University; Jenna Gregor, MS, CCC-SLP, Penn West University; Theresa Jacopetti, MS, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University; Akila Rajappa, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, East Stroudsburg University; Irina Brailovski, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Jefferson Abington Health, Benchmark Therapy, Private Practice; Staci Sorrell, MS, CCC-SLP, Jefferson Health

Throughout our careers, most speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are called upon to serve in the role of a clinical instructor. Yet, serving in this role can be challenging, especially in the fast-paced healthcare setting, where time for imparting knowledge and skills to student clinicians and clinical fellows. This seminar will review ASHA’s 13 Tasks of Supervision and apply them to the healthcare and telepractice settings working with pediatric and adult clients. A variety pf models of supervision will be reviewed and applied to the healthcare and telepractice settings. Participants will have the opportunity to engage collaboratively in developing solutions to a variety of challenging hypothetical situations that may be encountered by clinical instructors in the healthcare and telepractice settings. The seminar will also include evidence-based practices, models of diversity, supervisor resources and words of wisdom for clinical supervisors to ensure effective clinical instruction experiences.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify foundational skills necessary to be effective clinical instructors in the healthcare and telepractice settings.
  • Identify and apply standard protocols to be effective clinical instructors in the healthcare and telepractice settings.
  • Identify various problematic supervisory situations and engage with others to develop appropriate solutions.

Time-Ordered Agenda

5 mins: Introductions
10 mins: ASHA guidelines, foundational information
20 mins: Foundational skills necessary to be an effective clinical instructor
20 mins: Review of various problematic supervisory situations with correlating solutions (engaging with others to develop appropriate solutions given scenarios)
20 mins: Standard protocols to be effective clinical instructors
5 mins: Summary
10 mins: Q & A

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Session 41Strategies, Solutions and Supports for School-Based SLPs

Lauren Arner, MA, CCC-SLP, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

In light of recent ASHA School Survey results, school-based professionals consistently identify high workload and caseload size as prominent challenges. Drawing on insights from ASHA technical consultation and stakeholder groups, we will discuss actionable solutions and available resources for school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Participants will be equipped with valuable tools and resources provided by ASHA to comprehensively analyze workload and use evidence-based practices. Through interactive discussions and real case examples, attendees will gain practical insights into utilizing ASHA’s resources and transforming challenges into opportunities for growth and enhanced professional practice in school-based speech-language pathology.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Use an ASHA workload tool to analyze SLP data and service delivery.
  • Explore, identify and implement solutions for longstanding issues affecting school-based practice.
  • Identify and use evidence-based practice resources for school-based practice.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

10:00 am-11:30 am

Session 42Empowering Adult Health Literacy: Functional Application for SLP Practice

Lynn Young, MA, CCC-SLP, ASHA SIG 15

The American Medical Association defines health literacy as “the ability to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions and follow instructions for treatment.” Speech language pathologists (SLPs) are uniquely qualified to assess each patient’s underlying receptive and expressive language skills, as well as the cognitive communication competency needed for successful management of health related tasks. The SLP’s role in the assessment and treatment of their patient’s cognitive communication and receptive and expressive language skills, supports a plan of care that promotes patient navigation of various health management models. These include, but are not limited to, health promotion, healthcare and disease management and navigating the healthcare system. This presentation will define health literacy, examine types of literacy and consider influencing factors. The role of the SLP is defined, and a variety of health literacy assessments are reviewed, as well as practical tips for integrating reading comprehension, written expression, functional communication and decision making into treatment planning. Providing scenarios that offer guided-practice for patients to navigate communication exchanges with healthcare partners ensures patient success. The SLP’s scope of practice supports the inclusion of health literacy subskills, alongside traditional treatment approaches provided in post-acute settings. SLPs are experts who can support the interprofessional team in tailoring their message, and providing the right format, content and return demonstration opportunities to promote understanding and application of concepts.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define health literacy and influencing factors.
  • Identify health literacy assessments, health literacy tools and identify risk factors to enhance patient centered goal writing and treatment planning.
  • Integrate health literacy into SLP practice, and explore the link between health literacy and positive health population outcomes.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Adult SLP

Session 43Hanen’s Updated It Takes Two to Talk® Program Evaluation Outcomes

Rachelle Comeau, MS, SLP(C); Dashiel Brockman, MS, SLP(C), from The Hanen Centre

This presentation describes the outcomes of an internal program evaluation conducted on a revised version of Hanen’s It Takes Two to Talk® Program for Parents of Children with Language Delays, a manualized, evidence-based parent-implemented intervention for groups of parents/caregivers. It Takes Two to Talk® is designed to build the capacity of parents of young children to support their child’s communication development. The program is offered to parents of children with a range of communication abilities, from those who are not yet communicating intentionally to those who are using short phrases. The program evaluation was undertaken to inform decisions regarding whether the program is achieving the intended outcomes or whether further revisions are required. Given the heterogeneity of the children in the program, the evaluation addressed changes in each parent-child dyad on a number of pre/post measures. Pre- and post- program video recordings were analyzed to determine the number of child initiations and the largest number of back and forth turns each child took in a three-minute unstructured play activity with their parent. Each child’s interaction and communication skills were compared pre- and post-program. Changes in how and why each child communicated and how well they participated in functional daily interactions were reported using the Focus on Outcomes of Children Under Six (FOCUS-34; Thomas- Stonell et al., 2015). In addition, recordings were analyzed to measure the frequency of parents’ use of program strategies. Outcomes for individual children and parents will be reported, as well as changes in family perception of well-being.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the goals of the It Takes Two to Talk® Program.
  • Identify three outcomes for the children in the It Takes Two to Talk® Program.
  • Identify two outcomes for the parents in the It Takes Two to Talk® Program.

Instructional Level: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric SLP

Session 44Intercollegiate and Interprofessional Service-Learning Experience in Belize

Isabella Fredo, BS; Hannah Bilenski, BS, from Misericordia University; Mariele Gates, Alvernia University; Jordan Napkora; Raymond Bishop, from Alvernia University; Adina Rosenthal, MS, CCC-SLP; Erin Roberts, MS, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University; Robin Zappin, EdD; Gregory Chown, OTD, OTR/L, from Alvernia University

Interprofessional service-learning experiences have been shown to improve health professional students’ understanding of the roles and responsibilities of other professions, advance their understanding of culture, and improve the health of the communities served. However, providing sustainable care once the interdisciplinary team leaves is challenging. This session will present findings from an intercollegiate and interprofessional collaboration between speech-language pathology (SLP), occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) students, which focuses on providing sustainable service. Healthcare students from two universities will provide sustainable rehabilitation, habilitation and education to three different community partners in Belize. This experience includes a credit-bearing course, which occurs before departure and focuses on culturally appropriate and sustainable education. In Belize, students participate in interprofessional group work and daily journal assignments. Following the trip, a thematic analysis of students’ daily journals and first-hand accounts from community members will be conducted. Results will explore themes such as cultural competence, interprofessional practice benefits and sustainability of care. Our presentation provides a model for implementing interprofessional, intercollegiate and international services with a focus on creating sustainable rehabilitation and education. The importance of this experience for student learning, as well as the communities served, will be highlighted.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three ways to implement sustainable treatment techniques in an international country.
  • Describe three benefits of intercollegiate service-learning collaboration for students and faculty.
  • Examine the advantages of interprofessional service for SLP, OT and PT students and faculty.

Time -Ordered Agenda:

  • 20 minutes: Introduction
    • History and overview of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice in Belize
    • Three I’s Model: Interprofessional, Intercollegiate, International
    • Interprofessional and Intercollegiate Course
  • 25 minutes: Providing sustainable rehabilitation and education
  • 25 minutes: Interprofessional and intercollegiate collaborative practice
  • 10 minutes: Conclusion
    • Challenges
    • Future directions
  • 10 minutes: Question/Answer

Instructional Level: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest